Hobart, Australia
Hobart, Australia

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Janes J.K.,University of Tasmania | Duretto M.F.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Australian Systematic Botany | Year: 2010

A new classification for subtribe Pterostylidinae (Orchidaceae) is formally described in which there is one genus, Pterostylis R.Br., two subgenera and 10 sections. Five new combinations are made for this classification at the ranks of subgenus and section, viz. Pt. subg. Oligochaetochilus (Szlach.) Janes Duretto, Pt. sect. Parviflorae (Benth.) Janes Duretto, Pt. sect. Pharochilum (D.L.Jones M.A.Clem.) Janes Duretto, Pt. sect. Stamnorchis (D.L.Jones M.A.Clem.) Janes Duretto and Pt. sect. Urochilus (D.L.Jones M.A.Clem.) Janes Duretto. Pt. ser. Parviflorae Benth. is lectotypified. To complete the revision, seven new species-level combinations are made for two species from Western Australia, one from New South Wales and four from Queensland, viz. Pt. anaclasta (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto, Pt. extranea (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto, Pt. pearsonii (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto, Pt. pedina (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto, Pt. sinuata (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto, Pt. timothyi (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto and Pt. thulia (D.L.Jones) Janes Duretto. © 2010 CSIRO.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Muelleria | Year: 2011

The genera Japewia and Japewiella (lichenised Ascomycetes) are recorded for Australia for the first time, based on collections from Tasmania. The species Japewia subaurifera Muhr & Tønsberg and Japewiella pruinosula (MüILArg.) Kantvilas comb. nov. are described and discussed. The latter is also known from New South Wales and Victoria.


Baker M.L.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Plant Protection Quarterly | Year: 2013

The alien species, Daphne laureola L., is reported as naturalised in Australia for the first time. It has been found at Fern Tree, Tasmania, on the foothills of Mount Wellington, where it has been spread, most likely by birds, from garden plantings into adjacent bushland. This also represents the first instance of the genus Daphne L. being naturalised in Australia. A detailed account is provided, including a description, notes on its distribution and ecology and a comparison with other species similar in appearance.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Muelleria | Year: 2015

Two lichens new to science are described and illustrated: Ramboldia atromarginata Kantvilas is corticolous in wet sclerophyll forest in Victoria, and R. greeniana Kantvilas is a saxicolous species found chiefly in upland areas of Tasmania. The New Zealand endemic taxon, Lecidea subsericea Zahlbr., is found to be a synonym of Ramboldia stuartii (Hampe) Kantvilas & Elix. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Lichenologist | Year: 2012

Three new species of Menegazzia are described and illustrated, and their relationships and affinities to other species in the genus discussed. Menegazzia bjerkeana Kantvilas is an isidiate species from the coastal ranges of New South Wales; M. brattii Kantvilas is an eight-spored species related to the widespread M. pertransita (Müll. Arg.) R. Sant., and is endemic to Kerguelen Island; and M. gallowayi Kantvilas is an eight-spored species from South Island, New Zealand. Menegazzia sanguinascens (Räsänen) R. Sant. is recorded from Kerguelen for the first time. © 2012 British Lichen Society.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Lichenologist | Year: 2012

With 30 species, Tasmania is a major area of species diversity in the genus Menegazzia. Seven of these are new to science: M. abscondita Kantvilas, known from Tasmania and New Zealand, and M. athrotaxidis Kantvilas, M. hypogymnioides Kantvilas, M. petraea Kantvilas, M. ramulicola Kantvilas, M. subtestacea Kantvilas and M. tarkinea Kantvilas, all endemic to Tasmania. An identification key, descriptions based exclusively on Tasmanian collections, and detailed discussion of distribution, ecology, chemical composition and inter-species relationships are provided. All literature records of Menegazzia species pertaining to Tasmania are accounted for. New synonyms include: Menegazzia prototypica P. James and Parmelia pertusa var. coskinodes F. Wilson [synonyms of M. myriotrema (Müll. Arg.) R. Sant.], M. fertilis P. James [a synonym of M. platytrema (Müll. Arg.) R. Sant.] and Parmelia pertusa var. montana F. Wilson (a synonym of M. subtestacea). Incorrectly recorded species that should be deleted from the Tasmanian census include M. castanea P. James & D. J. Galloway (present on Macquarie Island) and M. testacea P. James & D. J. Galloway (endemic to New Zealand). The South American species, M. sanguinascens (Räs.) R. Sant., is recorded in Australasia (Tasmania) for the first time, whereas the widespread south-eastern Australian M. norstictica P. James is recorded for Western Australia. Salient features of the genus are discussed, including morphology, anatomy and chemistry. The biogeography of the genus is explored briefly. Twelve species (40%) are endemic to Tasmania, a level of endemism unmatched by any other species-rich genus on the island. Twelve species are shared with mainland Australia, eleven are shared with New Zealand, and only four species are shared with southern South America, all of which are sorediate, suggesting they are products of long-distance dispersal. © 2012 British Lichen Society.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Lichenologist | Year: 2012

The new species Lecanora coppinsiarum Kantvilas is described, based on collections from Tasmania. It is characterized by an entirely sorediate thallus containing atranorin only, and the anatomy of its biatorine apothecia, its Lecanora-type asci and small, hyaline, simple ascospores suggest a relationship to L. symmicta (Ach.) Ach. The South American species L. subviridis de la Rosa & Messuti is recorded for the first time for Tasmania. © 2012 British Lichen Society.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Lichenologist | Year: 2012

The new genus, Cameronia Kantvilas, is described and illustrated. It is characterized by a crustose thallus, a chlorococcalean photobiont, deeply immersed perithecioid ascomata, four-spored asci with an intensely hemiamyloid outer wall and non-amyloid, well-developed tholus, and hyaline, muriform ascospores. The taxonomic position of the new genus is uncertain although a relationship with the Ostropomycetidae is likely. Two species, both endemic to the highlands of Tasmania, are described: C. pertusarioides Kantvilas, which is one of the most common lichens on dolerite in alpine Tasmania, and C. tecta Kantvilas, which is confined to metamorphosed sediments. © Copyright British Lichen Society 2011.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium | Elix J.A.,Australian National University
Muelleria | Year: 2013

Eight species of Lecidella (Lecanoraceae, lichenised Ascomycetes) are recorded for Tasmania: L. destituta Kantvilas & Elix sp. nov., L. elaeochroma (Ach.) Hazsl., L. flavovirens Kantvilas & Elix sp. nov., L. granulosula (Nyl.) Knoph & Leuckert, L. stigmatea (Ach.) Hertel & Leuckert, L. sublapicida (C. Knight) Hertel and L. xylogena (Müll. Arg.) Kantvilas & Elix comb. nov. (all present in mainland Australia), and theTasmanian endemic L. montana Kantvilas & Elix sp. nov. All species are described in full, and notes on their characterisation, inter-relationships, distribution and ecology are provided. The status of the names Lecidea minutula Müll. Arg. and L. leptolomoides Müll. Arg., based on collections from Victoria, is discussed briefly.


Kantvilas G.,Tasmanian Herbarium
Lichenologist | Year: 2014

Five new species of Rimularia, all endemic to Tasmania, are described, discussed and illustrated: Four species are saxicolous: R. albotessellata Kantvilas (containing pannarin): R. aspicilioides Kantvilas (containing 2′-O-methylperlatolic acid and with apothecia with a thalline margin); R. circumgrisea Kantvilas (containing norstictic acid, and with ascospores 8·5-14·0×5·0-6·5 μm); and R. coppinsiana Kantvilas (containing bourgeanic acid and with ascospores 10-19×7-12 μm). The corticolous R. asteriphila Kantvilas lacks lichen substances, contains Sedifolia-grey pigment and has ascospores 10-15×7-10 μm. The widespread R. psephota (Tuck.) Hertel & Rambold, with which several of the new taxa are compared, is also described, based on Tasmanian collections. Several chemical compounds, including bourgeanic acid, pannarin and 2′-O-methylperlatolic acid, are recorded for the genus for the first time. A key to the 12 species currently recorded for Tasmania is presented. © British Lichen Society 2014.

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