Tannenweg 16

Stammham, Germany

Tannenweg 16

Stammham, Germany
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Hone D.W.E.,University College Dublin | Hone D.W.E.,University of Bristol | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | Frey E.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde Karlsruhe | Roper M.,Museum Solnhofen
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Background: The 'Solnhofen Limestone' beds of the Southern Franconian Alb, Bavaria, southern Germany, have for centuries yielded important pterosaur specimens, most notably of the genera Pterodactylus and Rhamphorhynchus. Here we describe a new genus of non-pterodactyloid pterosaur based on an extremely well preserved fossil of a young juvenile: Bellubrunnus rothgaengeri (gen. et sp. nov.). Methodology/Principal Findings: The specimen was examined firsthand by all authors. Additional investigation and photography under UV light to reveal details of the bones not easily seen under normal lighting regimes was completed. Conclusions/Significance: This taxon heralds from a newly explored locality that is older than the classic Solnhofen beds. While similar to Rhamphorhynchus, the new taxon differs in the number of teeth, shape of the humerus and femur, and limb proportions. Unlike other derived non-pterodacytyloids, Bellubrunnus lacks elongate chevrons and zygapophyses in the tail, and unlike all other known pterosaurs, the wingtips are curved anteriorly, potentially giving it a unique flight profile. © 2012 Hone et al.


Schweigert G.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | Dietl G.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2010

We describe a fossil feather from Nusplingen, an Upper Jurassic Solnhofen-type Fossillagerstätte in SW Germany. It is Late Kimmeridgian in age and thus stratigraphically older than the isolated Archaeopteryx feather from the Lower Tithonian of Solnhofen, Bavaria, described in 1861. The features of the new find are unique, therefore it is impossible to identify the animal from which this feather came, but despite this uncertainty, the specimen may play an important role in our understanding of the evolution of feathers. © 2009 Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Arratia G.,University of Kansas | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16
Fossil Record | Year: 2010

The Late Jurassic Bavarichthys incognitus, n. gen. n. sp. from Ettling, Bavaria, is described. The new species represents the oldest record of a crossognathiform in Europe and together with Chongichthys from the Oxfordian of South America stands at the basal levels of a clade including crossognathids and pachyrhizodontoids. In addition, the new fish represents the first record of a crossognathiform in the Solnhofen Limestones. The new genus is characterized by numerous features such as the presence of infraorbitals 1-3 independent and 4 + 5 fused; two supramaxillary bones present; supramaxilla 2 considerably shorter than supramaxilla 1 and lacking an antero-dorsal process; well-developed series of epineural, epicentral and epipleural intermuscular bones; parhypural and hypurals 1 and 2 partially fused to each other; a series of epaxial basal fulcra; and a few, elongate fringing fulcra associated with the dorsal leading margin of caudal fin. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Fuchs D.,Hokkaido University | Iba Y.,Hokkaido University | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | Keupp H.,Free University of Berlin | Klug C.,University of Zürich
Lethaia | Year: 2016

A morphological comparison of shell-muscle contacts in coleoid cephalopods mainly from the Early Jurassic (Toarcian) Posidonia Shales of Holzmaden (Germany), the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Oxford Clay of Christian Malford (UK), Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) plattenkalks of Solnhofen (Germany), and the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Hâdjoula and Hâkel (Lebanon) provides new and meaningful insights into their locomotion systems. The study shows that both pro-ostracum- and gladius-bearing coleoids are typified by a marginal mantle attachment and by distinctly separated fins, which usually insert (indirectly via the shell sac and basal fin cartilages) to posterior shell parts. While absent in gladius-bearing forms, mantle-locking cartilages might have existed already in pro-ostracum-bearing belemnoids. Similar to ectocochleate ancestors, funnel- and cephalic retractors are generally attached to the internal (ventral) shell surface. A comparison of Mesozoic and Recent gladius-bearing coleoids shows that the locomotion system (most significantly the dorsal mantle configuration, and the presence of nuchal- and funnel-locking cartilages) is fundamentally different. This does not support the concept of ‘fossil teuthids’, but suggests, owing to similarities with Recent Vampyroteuthis, placement of Mesozoic gladius-bearing coleoids within the Octobrachia (Octopoda + Vampyromorpha). Classification of Mesozoic gladius-bearing coleoids as octobrachians implies that: (1) unambiguous teuthids are still unknown in the fossil record and (2) the similarity between Recent and some fossil gladiuses represents a matter of homoplasy. © 2015 Lethaia Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd


Martill D.M.,University of Portsmouth | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | Longrich N.R.,University of Bath
Science | Year: 2015

Snakes are a remarkably diverse and successful group today, but their evolutionary origins are obscure. The discovery of snakes with two legs has shed light on the transition from lizards to snakes, but no snake has been described with four limbs, and the ecology of early snakes is poorly known. We describe a four-limbed snake from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Crato Formation of Brazil. The snake has a serpentiform body plan with an elongate trunk, short tail, and large ventral scales suggesting characteristic serpentine locomotion, yet retains small prehensile limbs. Skull and body proportions as well as reduced neural spines indicate fossorial adaptation, suggesting that snakes evolved from burrowing rather than marine ancestors. Hooked teeth, an intramandibular joint, a flexible spine capable of constricting prey, and the presence of vertebrate remains in the guts indicate that this species preyed on vertebrates and that snakes made the transition to carnivory early in their history. The structure of the limbs suggests that they were adapted for grasping, either to seize prey or as claspers during mating. Together with a diverse fauna of basal snakes from the Cretaceous of South America, Africa, and India, this snake suggests that crown Serpentes originated in Gondwana.


Kellner A.W.A.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | Wang X.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | De Campos D.A.,Museu de Ciencias da Terra DNPM | And 3 more authors.
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2010

The soft tissue preserved in the holotype (IVPP V12705) of Jeholopterus ningchengensis from the Daohugou Bed (Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous) of China is described in detail. The plagiopatagium can be divided into the distal, comparatively more rigid actinopagatium and a proximal, more tensile tenopatagium. The actinopatagium extends from the wing finger to the articulation between the humerus and the forearm, and shows the presence of at least three layers containing actinofibrils. In each layer, the actinofibrils are parallel to subparallel, but this direction diverges from layer to layer. When distinct layers of actinofibrils are superimposed (owing to taphonomic compression), a reticular pattern is generated. The presence of layers with differently oriented actinofibrils is widespread in this pterosaur. A well-developed integumental covering formed by fibres (here named pycnofibres) that are thicker than the actinofibrils is present. Ungual sheaths that extend the length of the pedal and manual claws of this taxon are also observed. Although the understanding of the mechanical properties of the wing membrane is hampered by the lack of knowledge regarding the composition of the actinofibrils, the configuration observed in Jeholopterus might have allowed subde changes in the membrane tension during flight, resulting in more control of flight movements and the organization of the wing membrane when the animal was at rest. © 2009 The Royal Society.


Klug C.,University of Zürich | Schweigert G.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde | Fuchs D.,Hokkaido University | Kruta I.,CNRS Center for Research on Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16
Biology Letters | Year: 2016

Although the calcitic hard parts of belemnites (extinct Coleoidea) are very abundant fossils, their soft parts are hardly known and their mode of life is debated. New fossils of the Jurassic belemnitid Acanthoteuthis provided supplementary anatomical data on the fins, nuchal cartilage, collar complex, statoliths, hyponome and radula. These data yielded evidence of their pelagic habitat, their nektonic habit and high swimming velocities. The new morphological characters were included in a cladistic analysis, which confirms the position of the Belemnitida in the stem of Decabrachia (Decapodiformes). © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Frey E.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde | Meyer C.A.,Naturhistorisches Museum | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16
Swiss Journal of Geosciences | Year: 2011

Based on an almost complete three-dimensionally preserved skeleton, a new genus and species of an azhdarchoid pterosaur Aurorazhdarcho primordius n. gen. n. sp. from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen limestone (Early Tithonian) of the Eichstätt area (Bavaria, Germany) is described. Furthermore, a new family the Protazhdarchidae is proposed. The specimen is attributed to the Azhdarchoidea based on its glenoid fossa level with the sternum, the shovel-like shape of the sternal plate, the wide furca of the coracoid, the metacarpus being longer than radius and ulna, the femur being 1/3 longer than the humerus, the femorotibial ratio, and the hammer-shaped humerus among other diagnostic features. Under UV-light, soft tissue preservation around the external mould of the head is visible. It consists of tiny flakes possibly remnants of skin. The dorsally curved outline of the external mould of the head suggests the presence of a cranial crest. The new species is the oldest record of the azhdarchoid pterosaurs. It supports the Eurasian origin of this group that includes the largest flying animal ever. © 2011 Swiss Geological Society.


Hone D.W.E.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology | Tischlinger H.,Tannenweg 16 | Xu X.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology | Zhang F.,CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

Background:The holotype of the theropod non-avian dinosaur Microraptor gui from the Early Cretaceous of China shows extensive preservation of feathers in a halo around the body and with flight feathers associated with both the fore and hindlimbs. It has been questioned as to whether or not the feathers did extend into the halo to reach the body, or had disassociated and moved before preservation. This taxon has important implications for the origin of flight in birds and the possibility of a four-winged gliding phase. Methodology/Principal Findings:Examination of the specimen under ultraviolet light reveals that these feathers actually reach the body of the animal and were not disassociated from the bones. Instead they may have been chemically altered by the body tissues of the animal meaning that they did not carbonise close into the animal or more likely were covered by other decaying tissue, though evidence of their presence remains. Conclusions/Significance:These UV images show that the feathers preserved on the slab are genuinely associated with the skeleton and that their arrangement and orientation is likely correct. The methods used here to reveal hidden features of the specimen may be applicable to other specimens from the fossil beds of Liaoning that produced Microraptor. © 2010 Hone et al.


PubMed | Tannenweg 16, University of Zürich, Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde, CNRS Center for Research on Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments and Hokkaido University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biology letters | Year: 2016

Although the calcitic hard parts of belemnites (extinct Coleoidea) are very abundant fossils, their soft parts are hardly known and their mode of life is debated. New fossils of the Jurassic belemnitid Acanthoteuthis provided supplementary anatomical data on the fins, nuchal cartilage, collar complex, statoliths, hyponome and radula. These data yielded evidence of their pelagic habitat, their nektonic habit and high swimming velocities. The new morphological characters were included in a cladistic analysis, which confirms the position of the Belemnitida in the stem of Decabrachia (Decapodiformes).

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