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PubMed | Florida College and Tamarac Inc.
Type: | Journal: Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry | Year: 2016

In the context of an educational program on schizophrenia for psychiatry trainees, this survey study analyzed associations between self-reported training adequacy, experience in providing patient care, and comfort level in performing schizophrenia-related clinical skills. The influence of the education on comfort level was also assessed for each skill.Survey respondents were psychiatry residents and fellows who participated in a schizophrenia education program at an in-person workshop or through online videos recorded at the workshop. In a pre-program survey, participants reported their experience in providing schizophrenia patient care and rated their training adequacy and comfort level for performing seven clinical skills involved in diagnosing and treating schizophrenia. The post-program survey included items for reassessing comfort level in performing the skills.Across the seven clinical skills, the proportion of respondents (n=79) who agreed or strongly agreed that their training was adequate ranged from 29 to 88%. The proportion of high ratings for comfort level in skill performance ranged from 45 to 83%. Comfort level was significantly associated with training adequacy for all seven clinical skills and with experience in providing patient care for four skills. For all skills, comfort level ratings were significantly higher after versus before the educational workshop. Commonly indicated needs for further training included education on new therapies, exposure to a broader range of patients, and opportunities for longitudinal patient management.Psychiatry trainees self-reported, disease-specific training adequacy, experiences, and comfort level have unique applications for developing and evaluating graduate medical curriculum.


Sapir T.,Tamarac Inc. | Moreo K.,Tamarac Inc. | Carter J.D.,Tamarac Inc. | Greene L.,Tamarac Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Digestive Diseases and Sciences | Year: 2016

Background: Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists. Aims: We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities. Methods: Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists’ performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6 months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure. Results: The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14 %, p = 0.009); influenza vaccination (+13 %, p = 0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20 %, p = 0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF-α therapy (+10 %, p = 0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF-α therapy (+9 %, p = 0.010); assessment of side effects (+17 %, p = 0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13 %, p = 0.013). Conclusions: QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists’ compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


PubMed | University of Michigan, Indegene Total Therapeutic Management and Tamarac Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Digestive diseases and sciences | Year: 2016

Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists.We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities.Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure.The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14%, p=0.009); influenza vaccination (+13%, p=0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20%, p=0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF- therapy (+10%, p=0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF- therapy (+9%, p=0.010); assessment of side effects (+17%, p=0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13%, p=0.013).QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities.


Powers B.,Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care | Greene L.,Tamarac Inc. | Balfe L.M.,Tamarac Inc.
Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy | Year: 2011

Background: In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) published a comparative effectiveness review (CER) on the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. The main findings indicated that the 2 classes of antihypertensive medications caused similar reductions in blood pressure, although higher rates of adverse events, especially cough, were reported by patients treated with ACEIs. In addition, the 2007 review indicated no treatmentrelated differences in lipid levels, glycemic control, or progression of kidney disease among the agents. Since 2007, 39 relevant studies have been published that compare outcomes for adults treated with ACEIs versus ARBs or a drug in one of these 2 classes versus a direct renin inhibitor (DRI). To systematically analyze findings from the new research, AHRQ commissioned and, in June 2011, published an updated comparative effectiveness review on the benefits and risks of agents that target the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), specifically ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. Objectives: To (a) familiarize health care professionals with the methods and findings from AHRQ's 2011 comparative effectiveness review on ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs for adults with essential hypertension; (b) provide commentary and encourage consideration of the clinical and managed care applications of the review findings; and © identify limitations to the existing research on the benefits and risks of ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. Summary: Consistent with the findings from AHRQ's 2007 report, the 2011 update indicated no overall differences in blood pressure control, mortality rates, and major cardiovascular events in patients treated with ACEIs versus ARBs. With a low strength of evidence, 2 studies reported a small significantly greater blood pressure reduction for patients treated with the DRI aliskiren versus the ACEI ramipril. Studies evaluating the DRI aliskiren versus ACEIs and ARBs on mortality and morbidity outcomes were relatively short, and few deaths or cardiovascular events occurred, resulting in insufficient evidence to discern differences. A random-effects meta-analysis of 23 RCTs comparing ACEIs and ARBs found no significant difference in the proportion of patients who achieved successful blood pressure control on a single antihypertensive agent. Compared with ARBs and the DRI aliskiren, ACEIs were consistently associated with higher rates of cough. Withdrawals due to adverse events were modestly more frequent for patients receiving ACEI rather than ARBs or DRIs; this is consistent with the differential rates of cough. There was no evidence of differential effects of ACEIs, ARBs, or DRIs on the outcomes of lipids, renal outcomes, carbohydrate metabolism or diabetes, or left ventricular mass; however, there was not a high strength of evidence for any of these outcomes. Regarding the question of whether ACEIs, ARBs, or DRIs are associated with better outcomes in specific patient subgroups, the evidence was insufficient to reach firm conclusions. © 2011, Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy.


Moreo K.,Tamarac Inc. | Greene L.,Tamarac Inc. | Sapir T.,Tamarac Inc. | Cameron D.R.,Tamarac Inc.
Professional Case Management | Year: 2013

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This article is intended to update case managers on recent advances in comparative effectiveness research (CER) led by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The article explores potential implications and applications of CER findings to case management practice. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS: All case management settings. FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: An ongoing national movement to advance CER is intended to provide health care professionals with answers to questions about which diagnostic methods, therapies, devices, and services, among the available alternatives for a given disease or condition, may be most effective and safe for individual patients. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT: Knowledge and application of CER findings may benefit case managers in their roles of improving resource utilization, controlling costs, providing stewardship, coordinating care, educating patients, and promoting treatment adherence and self-sufficiency. The findings from a 2013 study on the comparative effectiveness of outpatient case management programs have implications for improving case management models, reinforcing standards in the profession, and advancing research in the field. Continuing education on CER is important for promoting positive values and appropriate applications of its findings to case management practice. Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams &Wilkins.


Moreo K.,Tamarac Inc. | Moreo N.,Tamarac Inc. | Urbano F.L.,Tamarac Inc. | Weeks M.,Tamarac Inc. | Greene L.,Tamarac Inc.
Professional Case Management | Year: 2014

PURPOSE OF STUDY: Care coordination, traditionally the purview of the case management field, is recognized as a national priority for improving health care delivery and patient outcomes. With reforms of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010, case managers face new challenges and opportunities in providing care coordination services. The evolving roles of case managers as members of interprofessional care teams will be influenced by new policies that enable physicians to be reimbursed for care coordination. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate case managersÊ self-assessed readiness for ACA reforms of care coordination and their perceptions of physiciansÊ understanding of case management and ability to lead care coordination efforts in evolving models. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS: Provisions of care coordination in the ACA affect case managers in all practice settings. The majority of this studys participants represented hospital and managed care settings. METHODOLOGY AND SAMPLE: An invitation to complete an 11-item online survey was sent by e-mail to 8,110 case managers in an opt-in database maintained by a health care continuing education company. Survey questions were designed to assess respondentsÊ (1) self-reported levels of knowledge and preparation for ACA care coordination provisions and (2) beliefs about the readiness and abilities of physicians to administer care coordination services. In addition, demographic data and open-ended comments regarding physiciansÊ roles in conducting care coordination were collected. Over a restricted 9-day period, 834 case managers representing various health care settings responded to the survey. RESULTS: The majority of respondents (63%) indicated that more than 50% of their day is dedicated to performing care coordination activities. However, 80% of all respondents reported being "not at all knowledgeable" or only "somewhat knowledgeable" about the new care coordination provisions in the ACA. Only 8% admitted to being "very prepared" to implement ACA changes. The majority of respondents (68%) perceive their case management departments to be at least "somewhat prepared" to implement necessary changes. Whereas 67% of respondents expect physicians to have at least a "moderate role" in implementing care coordination services, only 12% believe that physicians have more than "some" understanding of the processes of care coordination and case managersÊ roles. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: These qualitative study findings suggest that case managers from multiple practice settings perceive a lack of preparedness, knowledge, and understanding among themselves and physicians regarding ACA reforms that may significantly affect the delivery of care coordination services. The findings call for new initiatives in interprofessional education to address the knowledge gaps and enhance understanding of the collaborative roles among case managers and physicians.


PubMed | Tamarac Inc.
Type: Congresses | Journal: Journal of managed care & specialty pharmacy | Year: 2015

The 2013-2014 approvals of new direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have engendered a paradigm shift in HCV treatment and management, offering the potential for a cure at a population level. The availability of the highly effective and relatively safe DAAs prompted revisions to guidance recommendations based on new clinical trial evidence. In the context of this paradigm shift and considerations of the costs associated with the new DAAs, managed care professionals face new questions and challenges regarding HCV treatment and management approaches. To address the continuing education needs of this group, PRIME Education, Inc. (PRIME) conducted a symposium on HCV at the 27th Annual Meeting Expo of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy. Moderated by Michael R. Stinchon, Jr., RPh, the program panel featured 2 internationally recognized leaders in hepatitis C treatment and research: Norah Terrault, MD, MPH, and Alex Monto, MD.To summarize the educational symposium presentations and discussions.This article is organized by key questions that the panelists and attendees raised for discussion during the 2-hour symposium. The questions addressed methods for assessing liver fibrosis; comprehensive patient assessment to inform treatment decisions; the influence of viral load on decisions about treatment duration; the role of ribavirin in optimizing treatment efficacy; unmet treatment needs for patients with HCV genotype 3 or advanced liver disease; and managed care strategies for patient education, adherence promotion, and care coordination. In answering attendee questions on these issues, the expert panelists presented established evidence, and recognizing limitations to current evidence and guidance recommendations, they discussed applications of clinical judgment and offered their views and practices regarding individualized care for patients with HCV.In response to questions about the utility of noninvasive methods for assessing liver fibrosis, the expert panel presented a comparative overview of the methodology, accuracy, risks, limitations, and costs of noninvasive tests and liver biopsy. Discussion highlighted the strengths of noninvasive methods for diagnosing advanced disease and cirrhosis and the methods limitations that pose barriers to ensuring that patients receive necessary antiviral therapy. Based on guidance recommendations, treatment should be prioritized in patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis (Metavir score F3 to F4). While acknowledging the importance of this recommendation, the symposium panelists also argued that making effective decisions about whom, and when, to treat requires a more comprehensive clinical approach to patient assessment and adjusting recommended priorities according to individual patient considerations. This approach involves evaluating outcomes such as extrahepatic complications, including those affecting quality of life, functional status, and work productivity. In response to questions regarding decisions about DAA therapy duration based on viral load, the panel engaged the audience in thinking critically about evidence-based cutoff values and natural fluctuations of HCV RNA concentrations. Discussions centered on the importance of clinical judgment to ensure that the treatment duration promotes the highest efficacy and avoids risks of relapse. The panel responded to several audience questions about the role of ribavirin in new DAA regimens. Evidence-based presentations and discussions focused on patient-specific factors that must be considered to inform effective decisions about adding ribavirin. The panel took a similar approach to answering questions about emerging challenges and the difficult-to-treat populations of patients with HCV genotype 3 or advanced liver disease. The symposium concluded with presentation of, and discussion on, managed care strategies for educating patients about appropriate HCV medication use, improving adherence, and coordinating care provided by the interprofessional team.The availability of new DAAs for HCV raises new questions and challenges for managed care professionals, especially regarding prioritizing patients for immediate therapy as well as treatment and management approaches that account for the needs of individual patients and subpopulations. The educational symposium summarized in this article directly addressed key questions and challenges through presentations of evidence, guidance recommendations, and interactive discussions on the views and practices of international leaders in HCV treatment and research.


Trademark
Tamarac Inc. | Date: 2011-02-08

BLOOD TESTING KITS CONSISTING PRIMARILY OF A LANCET, FILTER PAPER, GAUZE AND BANDAGES. MEDICAL LABORATORY SERVICES.


Trademark
Tamarac Inc. | Date: 2011-07-19

BLOOD TESTING KITS CONSISTING PRIMARILY OF A LANCET, FILTER PAPER, GAUZE AND BANDAGES. MEDICAL LABORATORY SERVICES.


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