Osaka, Japan
Osaka, Japan

Takenaka Corporation is one of the largest architecture, engineering, and construction firm in Japan. Its headquarters is in Chūō-ku, Osaka, Osaka Prefecture.The company's website also claims it to be the oldest firm of that type anywhere in the world, since the demise of Kongō Gumi which was substantially older. Both company originate from family of architect-carpenter .In 1610 Tobei Masataka Takenaka , a shrine and temple carpenter, started a business in Nagoya. The business went on like a family business and built some of the first Western-style buildings during the last half of 19th century, most of them in Nagoya. In 1899 Toemon Takenaka , 14th generation descendant of the original founder, established a branch office in Kobe and founded Takenaka Corporation as an official company.The company grew more and more during the 20th century, its capital in 1909 was about ¥100.000, ¥6 million in 1938, ¥1.5 billion in 1959 and ¥50 billion in 1979; nowadays, Takenaka Corporation is a multinational company with offices in 18 different countries. Its president is Toichi Takenaka .The company is now regarded in Japan as one of the "Big Five" contractors ranked with Kajima, Obayashi, Shimizu and Taisei, and has a long history of designing buildings. The firm has built some of the most important buildings in Japan, including the Tokyo Tower, the Tokyo Dome , the Fukuoka Dome , and the Kobe Meriken Park Oriental Hotel among others.Among its proposals is the Sky City 1000 project.It reconstructed the Suzakumon in Nara. Wikipedia.


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News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.spie.org

A new concept of combined disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering is illustrated through a number of proposed tsunami and river flooding protection schemes. As serious disasters have occurred around the world in recent years, a large number of people have been lost despite rapid advancements in science and technology. Furthermore, my personal experience of the 11 March 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami prompted me to think about realizing disaster mitigation strategies through novel ideas and methodologies. To that end, I have brought together a number of enthusiastic people from various fields to build a platform and create new technologies and products for disaster mitigation. In addition to disaster mitigation, our new concept—‘disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering’—is sustainable, and has high reliability and low costs. Moreover, this platform is made possible because of the innovative field of smart structures and materials.1, 2 Several projects have already been undertaken to try and meet this challenge of disaster mitigation, some of which have been commercialized. These smart products include the Hitachi Zosen Corporation's neo RiSe® (no energy, no operation, rising seawall) land-mounted movable flap-gate-type seawall, which can be autonomously deployed using the force of tsunamis.3 The MOSE (experimental electromechanical module) project,4 Aqua Dam,5 and Water-Gate6 flood protection schemes have also been developed. In addition, Takenaka Corporation has proposed the so-called breakwater and breakwater group approach.7 The basis of our disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering concept is illustrated in Figure 1. Although serious disasters may not occur for long periods of time, the structures necessary for disaster mitigation require vast construction and maintenance costs. It is thus beneficial to use these same structures daily to produce something useful, such as energy. The energy that is generated can then be used for the monitoring, maintenance, corrosion suppression, and repair of these structures, as well as for many other purposes (e.g., lighting, charging, and drones). As the mitigation structures need to be available continuously (i.e., mostly for periods without disasters), their compactness is useful from an aesthetic point of view and their daily usage is indispensable for commercialization. In addition to the examples shown in Figure 1, many other ideas (e.g., ‘smart shelter’ and ‘smart furniture’) have been proposed to protect valuable items from damage during disaster situations (see Figure 2). In this work,8 we introduce several additional examples to demonstrate our disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering concept more comprehensively. Figure 1. Typical examples that illustrate the concept of disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering. Figure 2. Examples of proposed disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering projects. (a) A multi-layered flexible and deployable structural material (see Figure  Examples of proposed disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering projects. (a) A multi-layered flexible and deployable structural material (see Figure 3 ) for protection against tsunamis. (b) A honeycomb-based smart structure (see Figure 5 ) for river flooding protection. (c) An artificial forest for mitigation against high waves and tsunamis. Examples of ‘smart shelter’ and ‘smart furniture’ for the protection of valuable items are also illustrated in the bottom right. For protection against tsunamis, rigid and fragile structures are unsuitable. Strong, light, and flexible structures are preferred instead. We have therefore been developing a multilayered flexible and deployable structural material system—see Figure 2(a) and Figure 3—which can be used to diminish the force of a tsunami. This system can also be used to dissipate the tsunami's energy by separating water flows and letting them conflict with each other. Figure 3. Top: Images of a multi-layered and deployable structural material system that can be used to diminish the force of a tsunami. Bottom: Computational fluid dynamics flow simulations are used to quantitatively evaluate the energy absorption of this newly designed tsunami barrier. Our second example—artificial and multifunctional forests—is illustrated in Figure 2(c). Natural forests present several problems, including low fractions of trees, low visibility of ocean waves, low strength, and long periods of growth. With our proposed artificial forests, we therefore intend to have a better ability to mitigate against high waves and tsunamis. We can achieve an ideal state for this forest by optimizing various parameters (e.g., configuration, density, and material). So far, we have used a water channel set up (see Figure 4) to examine a couple of these experimental parameters. We are also considering multifunctional designs for the artificial forests. Figure 4. Side view of water flow experiment (including aluminum cylinders) used to characterize the proposed artificial forest approach to tsunami mitigation. Another of our examples—see Figure 2(b) and Figure 5—is a new smart honeycomb-based structure, which can be used to protect against flooding. We have demonstrated the possibility of automatically deploying this proposed structure in response to increased water levels. This autonomous height-controlled river or anti-flooding bank system can thus be regarded as a smart structure. We are also currently investigating the use of energy-harvesting materials and systems to improve the autonomy of this structure and to fully realize the concept. Figure 5. Illustration of the honeycomb-based deployable smart structure for flood protection. All dimensions are given in millimeters. POM: Polyoxymethylene. PVC: Polyvinyl chloride. Several different aspects of ongoing research are also being conducted with my various collaborators. For example, we are pursuing applications of piezoelectric polymers for electrical power generation with the use of ocean waves.9 In addition, we are investigating the dynamic deployment of smart inflatable tsunami bags for tsunami mitigation purposes.10 Novel underwater inflatable structures for smart coastal disaster mitigation are also being studied.11 In other work, we are examining structural health monitoring of pipelines for environment pollution mitigation.12 The Italian Space Agency's geodetic satellite LARES (Laser Relativity Satellite) is also being used to study global climate change.13 Finally, we are investigating smart disaster mitigation strategies in both Italy14 and in Thailand.15 In summary, we have developed a new concept of disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering that is based on smart structures and materials. To illustrate this approach, we have discussed three potential examples of projects for protection against tsunamis and river flooding. As part of a large international collaboration we are also continuing to conduct research in a number of different areas related to disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering. As part of our future work, I will be working with international executive members of the collaboration to establish a research committee. This committee will also include several researchers from Chiba University and members of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. Most recently,16 we have started to explore other innovative ideas and challenges (e.g., offshore megafloating structures with energy harvesting and dissipation functions). We welcome requests for information and collaboration possibilities. The work shown in Figure 3 was performed in collaboration with M. Kubo, Y. Maruyama, and G. Tanaka from Chiba University, Japan. Department of Mechanical Engineering Chiba University Hiroshi Asanuma obtained his Dr. Engineering degree from the University of Tokyo, Japan. He then worked as a research associate at the Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, and as an assistant professor and an associate professor at Chiba University. He has also worked as a visiting professor at the University of Wollongong, Australia, and Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Since then he has been a professor at Chiba University. He has also served as the chair of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) Materials and Processing (M&P) division, and he is the chair of the Active Material System technical section of the JSME M&P division. In addition, he is a fellow of JSME and the Institute of Physics. He has received several awards, including the Excellent Achievement Medal, International Medal, and Excellent Performance Medal from the JSME M&P division. 1. H. Asanuma, J. Su, M. Shahinpoor, F. Felli, A. Paolozzi, M. Nejhad, L. Hihara, et al., Development of disaster mitigation and sustainable engineering based on smart materials and structures, World Eng. Conf. Conv., p. 20344, 2015. 4. http://www.water-technology.net/projects/mose-project/ Information regarding the MOSE project in Venice, Italy. Accessed 25 April 2016. 9. J. Su, H. Asanuma, Applications of piezoelectric polymers in electrical power generation using ocean waves. Presented at SPIE Smart Structures/NDE 2015. 10. M. Shahinpoor, H. Asanuma, Dynamic deployment of smart inflatable tsunami airbags (TABs) for tsunami disaster mitigation, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. Proc. Conf. Smart Mater. Adapt. Struct. Intell. Syst. 2, p. SMASIS2015-8904, 2015. doi:10.1115/SMASIS2015-8904 11. K. Adachi, H. Asanuma, A novel underwater inflatable structure for smart coastal disaster mitigation, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. Proc. Conf. Smart Mater. Adapt. Struct. Intell. Syst., p. 9082, 2015. 12. F. Felli, A. Paolozzi, C. Vendittozzi, C. Paris, H. Asanuma, G. De Canio, M. Mongelli, A. Colucci, Structural health monitoring of pipelines for environment pollution mitigation, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. Proc. Conf. Smart Mater. Adapt. Struct. Intell. Syst. 2, p. SMASIS2015-8922, 2015. doi:10.1115/SMASIS2015-8922 13. G. Sindoni, C. Paris, C. Vendittozzi, E. C. Pavlis, I. Ciufolini, A. Paolozzi, The contribution of LARES to global climate change studies with geodetic satellites, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. Proc. Conf. Smart Mater. Adapt. Struct. Intell. Syst. 2, p. SMASIS2015-8924, 2015. doi:10.1115/SMASIS2015-8924 14. F. Felli, A. Paolozzi, C. Vendittozzi, C. Paris, Smart disaster mitigation in Italy: a brief overview on the state of the art, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. Proc. Conf. Smart Mater. Adapt. Struct. Intell. Syst. 2, p. SMASIS2014-7631, 2014. doi:10.1115/SMASIS2014-7631


The time-domain evaluation of the frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness was studied, and some transform methods were proposed. Although various kinds of stiffness have been well-transformed by these methods, some problems remain. In this paper, the following two problems are studied. First, the relationship between the proposed transform methods and Duhamel's integral is studied to understand the meaning of the two series of impulse responses obtained by the methods. Next, the time-domain transfer function, obtained by the transform of frequency-domain transfer function, is shown to expand the applicability of the methods. Seismic response values are easily calculated in the time domain using the function without FFT. The efficiency of the function is confirmed with a practical example problem. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.


It is well known that the properties of the soil deposits, especially the damping, depend on both frequency and strain amplitude. Therefore it is important to consider both dependencies to calculate the soil response against earthquakes in order to estimate input motions to buildings. However, it has been difficult to calculate the seismic response of the soil considering both dependencies directly. The author has studied the time domain evaluation of the frequency dependent dynamic stiffness, and proposed a simple hysteretic damping model that satisfiesthe causality condition. In this paper, this model was applied to nonlinear analyses considering the effects of the strain amplitude dependency of the soil. The basic characteristics of the proposed method were studied using a two layered soil model. The response behavior was compared with the conventional model e.g. the Ramberg-Osgood model and the SHAKE model. The characteristics of the proposed model were studied with regard to the effects of element divisions and the frequency dependency that is a key feature of the model. The efficiency of the model wasconfirmed by these studies.


SUMMARY Active mass dampers (AMDs) have been installed in more than 50 buildings in Japan to control building vibrations. Most of these were used to improve the comfort of those inside the building during strong winds. The authors developed an AMD system with a regenerating system to save energy. The second application of this system was its installation in a 24-story high-rise building in Tokyo. Monitoring of the building and the AMD began in November 2010. Verifications of the system's vibration control performance and regenerating energy were conducted on the basis of the monitoring records. The 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku shook this building and the AMD to a significant degree. The AMD was able to move under relatively strong vibrations by introducing a variable gain procedure. It also had a built-in brake system and oil buffers to help manage excessive input. In the event of an earthquake, the brake system successfully worked as designed. After automatic restarting after braking, the variable gain control procedure effectively managed the stroke displacement within a controllable stroke limit. In addition to the control performance of the AMD, the energy consumption during typhoon no. 11 in 2011, the earthquake on September 15, 2011, and the Tohoku earthquake is presented. The results show that the regenerating system saved as much as 35-65% of the energy that would be consumed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Patent
Takenaka Corporation | Date: 2013-02-28

A building is provided with a shutter, a stairway, and a handrail. The handrail has a connection member and a connection apparatus. The shutter opens and closes in a horizontal direction. A gap through which the shutter can pass is formed in the stairway. The handrail is provided at the stairway, and includes a handrail main body and a movable member. A gap through which the shutter can pass is formed in the handrail main body, and the movable member closes the gap in the handrail main body. The connection member connects one end portion of the movable member with the handrail main body such that the movable body is turnable relative to the handrail main body. The connection apparatus releasably connects another end portion of the movable member with the handle main body.


Patent
Japan National Institute of Materials Science, Takenaka Corporation and Awaji Materia Co. | Date: 2015-11-04

A damping alloy that is an Fe-Mn-(Cr, Ni)-Si-based damping alloy containing at least one of Cr or Ni or further contains Al, the damping alloy containing component compositions of:5 mass% Mn 28 mass%;0 mass% Cr 15 mass%;0 mass% Ni < 15 mass%;0 mass% < Si < 6.5 mass%; and0 mass% Al < 3 mass%,the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities,wherein the component compositions satisfy the following conditions:[%Ni] + 0.5 [%Mn] > 0.75 [%Cr] + 1.125 [%Si] + 2 [%Al]; and37 < [%Mn] + [%Cr] + 2 [%Ni] + 5 [%Al] < 45 (wherein [%Ni], [%Mn], [%Cr], [%Si], and [%Al] represent contents (mass%) of Ni, Mn, Cr, Si, and Al, respectively). Thus, a damping alloy for an elasto-plastic damper such as the Fe-Mn-(Cr, Ni)-Si-based alloy can be provided in which proof stress and stress amplitude after cyclic tension-compression deformation are lowered and the number of cycles to fracture is increased, the damping alloy being capable of being used in a maintenance-free manner even after long-period ground motion and being mass-produced.


Provided is a power supply system which makes it possible to stably supply power regardless of changes in placement of electrodes. The power supply system for supplying power to a load (24). The fixed body (10) includes: a first power-transmitting electrode (12) and second power-transmitting electrode (13); and an AC power supply (11) to supply AC power to the first power-transmitting electrode (12) and second power-transmitting electrode (13). The movable body (20) includes: a first power-receiving electrode (21 a) and second power-receiving electrode (21 b) to form a first coupling capacitor (30) and a second coupling capacitor (31), respectively, by being placed in a manner opposed to and not contacting corresponding ones of the first power-transmitting electrode (12) and second power-transmitting electrode (13) while facing one side of an interface, the one side not being faced by these power-transmitting electrodes, and a first capacitor (22a) and first coil (22b) connected to one another in parallel between the first power-receiving electrode (21 a) and second power-receiving electrode (21b). The AC power supply (11) transmits power to the load (24) via the first and second coupling capacitors under a condition that causes parallel resonance between the first capacitor (22a) and first coil (22b).


Patent
Takenaka Corporation | Date: 2010-08-11

A magnetic shield body comprises a cylindrical body unit configured by having a plurality of cylindrical bodies having permeability and mutually same longitudinal cross-sectional shapes arranged with a mutual interval such that central axes of the cylindrical bodies coincide with each other and side surfaces of the cylindrical bodies form a mutually same plane; and a supporting unit that supports a plurality of the cylindrical body units such that side surfaces of cylindrical bodies of the cylindrical body units face each other with a mutual interval.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Hyatt and Takenaka Corporation announced today their affiliates have entered into a management agreement for a 70-room Park Hyatt hotel in Kyoto, Japan. Expected to open in 2019, Park Hyatt Kyoto, will combine the elegance of the Park Hyatt brand with the distinctive culture of Japan’s ancient capital. Park Hyatt Kyoto will blend the iconic city’s historic landmarks, gardens and modern architecture to offer experiences that will capture the harmony of traditional and m


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Global real estate investment company Kennedy Wilson (NYSE:KW) today announced that the company has joint-ventured with the Takenaka Corporation (“Takenaka”) to acquire 400/430 California Street, a 247,000 sq. ft. office tower and 27,000 sq. ft. bank branch, in the North Financial District submarket of San Francisco, California, for $135 million. Kennedy Wilson invested $13.5 million in this transaction. The property is 100% occupied by MUFG Union Bank, who will leaseback the property and vacate the tower over the next 2 years on a staggered basis and the bank branch after 4 years. The property will subsequently undergo a complete interior renovation. Kennedy Wilson and Takenaka’s first real estate transaction occurred in 1996 when the company successfully sold an office building in Los Angeles on behalf of Takenaka. “We are very excited to acquire this iconic office tower in San Francisco’s financial district and to create our first joint-venture with Kennedy Wilson, the global real estate investment firm with whom we’ve established a long-term relationship,” said Toichi Takenaka, Chairman and CEO of Takenaka Corporation. “We have tremendous respect for the corporate philosophy that we share and trust we can complete this transaction enhancing both of our firms’ expertise.” Takenaka Corporation had their first design/construction project in San Francisco (and in the US) in the late 1960’s and has owned Hotel Nikko San Francisco since they developed the hotel in 1987. William McMorrow, CEO of Kennedy Wilson, added, “We are honored to have our first investment partnership with Takenaka, one of the most established and respected firms in the world, and hope to find future ways to invest together.” Situated in San Francisco’s financial district, 400 and 430 California Street is a class-A office tower and bank branch fully leased to Union Bank. The office tower provides excellent views of the San Francisco skyline, with a 10,000 sq. ft. deck over the roof of the bank branch and three additional exterior decks. The bank branch was designated a landmark of San Francisco in 1968. The property has a premiere location with close access to the California Street cable car line, two BART stations, and is a short walk to the Ferry Building. Kennedy Wilson’s asset management strategy includes a full-scale repositioning of the property, including a renovation of the lobby and other interior upgrades. James Andrew International advised the Takenaka Corporation in this transaction. Takenaka Corporation is among Japan's oldest and largest general contractors with a long history rich in tradition that spans over 400 years and includes creating many of Japan's most prominent architectural landmarks. Since 1960, Takenaka has established over twenty offices in many foreign countries and over the years has been the recipient of many design, technique, and quality awards. With annual sales in excess of $12 billion and a track record of acquiring and owning prime properties in various international locations, the group’s existing portfolio includes office buildings and hotels in London, New York, Kauai, and San Francisco. Takenaka Corporation currently has nearly 7,500 employees, including 2,500 architects, and the group offers comprehensive services worldwide across the entire spectrum of space creation from site location and planning to design, engineering and construction, as well as post-completion services such as facilities management and building maintenance. Kennedy Wilson (NYSE:KW) is a global real estate investment company. We own, operate, and invest in real estate both on our own and through our investment management platform. We focus on multifamily and commercial properties located in the Western U.S., UK, Ireland, Spain, Italy and Japan. To complement our investment business, the Company also provides real estate services primarily to financial services clients. For further information on Kennedy Wilson, please visit www.kennedywilson.com. Statements in this press release that are not historical facts are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of U.S. federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are estimates that reflect our management’s current expectations, are based on assumptions that may prove to be inaccurate and involve known and unknown risks. Accordingly, our actual results or performance may differ materially and adversely from the results or performance expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements, including for reasons that are beyond our control. For example, we may not be able to maintain our current acquisition or disposition pace or identify future properties to acquire on terms we consider attractive, and our current property portfolio may not perform as expected. Furthermore, the capitalization rate of our investments represents the net operating income of an investment for the year preceding its acquisition or disposition divided by the purchase or sale price. Capitalization rates represent historical performance and are not a guarantee of future net operating income. Accordingly, you should not unduly rely on these statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. We assume no duty to update the forward-looking statements, except as may be required by law.

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