Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Myneni A.A.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Chang S.-C.,University of California at Los Angeles | Niu R.,Shanxi Tumor Hospital | Liu L.,Taiyuan City Center for Disease Control and Prevention | And 7 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention | Year: 2016

Background: Evidence of anticancer properties of garlic for different cancer sites has been reported previously in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies but there is limited epidemiologic evidence on the association between garlic and lung cancer. Methods: We examined the association between raw garlic consumption and lung cancer in a case-control study conducted between 2005 and 2007 in Taiyuan, China. Epidemiologic data was collected by face-to-face interviews from 399 incident lung cancer cases and 466 healthy controls. We used unconditional logistic regression models to estimate crude and adjusted ORs (aOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Adjusted models controlled for age, sex, average annual household income 10 years ago, smoking, and indoor air pollution. Results: Compared with no intake, raw garlic intake was associated with lower risk of development of lung cancer with a dose-response pattern (aOR for <2 times/week = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.39-0.81 and aOR for 2 times/week = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34-0.74; Ptrend = 0.0002). Exploratory analysis showed an additive interaction of raw garlic consumption with indoor air pollution and with any supplement use in association with lung cancer. Conclusions: The results of the current study suggest that raw garlic consumption is associated with reduced risk of lung cancer in a Chinese population. Impact: This study contributes to the limited research in human population on the association between garlic and lung cancer and advocates further investigation into the use of garlic in chemoprevention of lung cancer. © 2016 American Association for Cancer Research. Source


Mu L.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Liu L.,Taiyuan City Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Niu R.,Shanxi Tumor Hospital | Zhao B.,Taiyuan City Center for Disease Control and Prevention | And 8 more authors.
Cancer Causes and Control | Year: 2013

Purpose: To investigate indoor particulate matter (PM) level and various indoor air pollution exposure, and to examine their relationships with risk of lung cancer in an urban Chinese population, with a focus on non-smoking women. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in Taiyuan, China, consisting of 399 lung cancer cases and 466 controls, of which 164 cases and 218 controls were female non-smokers. Indoor PM concentrations, including PM1, PM 2.5, PM7, PM10, and TSP, were measured using a particle mass monitor. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals after adjusting for age, education, annual income, and smoking. Results: Among non-smoking women, lung cancer was strongly associated with multiple sources of indoor air pollution 10 years ago, including heavy exposure to environmental tobacco smoke at work (aOR = 3.65), high frequency of cooking (aOR = 3.30), and solid fuel usage for cooking (aOR = 4.08) and heating (aORcoal stove = 2.00). Housing characteristics related to poor ventilation, including single-story, less window area, no separate kitchen, no ventilator, and rarely having windows open, are associated with lung cancer. Indoor medium PM2.5 concentration was 68 μg/m3, and PM10 was 230 μg/m3. PM levels in winter are strongly correlated with solid fuel usage for cooking, heating, and ventilators. PM1 levels in cases are more than 3 times higher than that in controls. Every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM1 is associated with 45 % increased risk of lung cancer. Conclusions: Indoor air pollution plays an important role in the development of lung cancer among non-smoking Chinese women. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source


Myneni A.A.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Chang S.-C.,University of California at Los Angeles | Niu R.,Shanxi Tumor Hospital | Liu L.,Taiyuan City Center for Disease Control and Prevention | And 12 more authors.
Lung Cancer | Year: 2013

Background/objectives: Genetic variants of telomerase reverse transcriptase (. TERT) and cleft lip and palate trans-membrane 1 like (. CLPTM1L) genes in chromosome 5p15.33 region were previously identified to influence the susceptibility to lung cancer. We examined the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TERT and CLPTM1L genes with lung cancer and explored their potential modifying effects on the relationship between environmental risk factors and lung cancer in a Chinese population. Methods: We genotyped rs2736100 (. TERT) and rs401681 (. CLPTM1L) SNPs in a case-control study with 399 lung cancer cases and 466 controls form Taiyuan, China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. Potential confounders were controlled for in the adjusted models. Results: We found that the GG genotype of TERT was positively associated with lung cancer (OR. =. 1.47, 95% CI: 1.00-2.16). The association was stronger in participants older than 60. years, exposed to low indoor air pollution and adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in recessive model analysis. The GA genotype of CLPTM1L was inversely associated with lung cancer (OR. =. 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54-0.97). The association was stronger in participants 60 years old or younger, males, heavy smokers, exposed to low indoor air pollution and SCC in dominant model analysis. Individuals carrying both TERT and CLPTM1L risk genotypes had higher risk of lung cancer (OR. =. 1.80, 95% CI: 1.15-2.82). Significant interaction was observed between CLPTM1L and indoor air pollution in association with lung cancer. Conclusions: Our results reiterate that genetic variants of TERT and CLPTM1L contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in Chinese population. These associations need to be verified in larger and different populations. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations