Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association

Taipei, Taiwan

Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association

Taipei, Taiwan
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Chen T.-B.,Taichung Veterans General Hospital | Yiao S.-Y.,Columbia University | Sun Y.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Sun Y.,En Chu Kong Hospital | And 11 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2017

Background: Comorbid medical diseases are highly prevalent in the geriatric population, imposing hardship on healthcare services for demented individuals. Dementia also complicates clinical care for other co-existing medical conditions. This study investigated the comorbidities associated with dementia in the elderly population aged 65 years and over in Taiwan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide, population-based, cross-sectional survey; participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 Taiwan counties between December 2011 and March 2013. After exclusion of incomplete or erroneous data, 8,456 subjects were enrolled. Of them, 6,183 were cognitively normal (control group), 1,576 had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 697 had dementia. We collected information about types of comorbidities (i.e., vascular risk factors, lung diseases, liver diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, and cancers), Charlson comorbidity index score, and demographic variables to compare subjects with normal cognition, MCI, and dementia. Results: Regardless of the cognitive condition, over 60% of the individuals in each group had at least one comorbid disease. The proportion of subjects possessing at least three comorbidities was higher in those with cognitive impairment (MCI 20.9%, dementia 27.3%) than in control group (15%). Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities. The mean number of comorbidities and Charlson comorbidity index score were greater in MCI and dementia groups than in control group. Logistic regression demonstrated that the comorbidities significantly associated with MCI and dementia were cerebrovascular disease (OR 3.35, CI 2.62-4.28), cirrhosis (OR 3.29, CI 1.29-8.41), asthma (OR 1.56, CI 1.07- 2.27), and diabetes mellitus (OR 1.24, CI 1.07-1.44). Conclusion: Multiple medical comorbid diseases are common in older adults, especially in those with cognitive impairment. Cerebrovascular disease, cirrhosis, asthma, and diabetes mellitus are important contributors to cognitive deterioration in the elderly. Efforts to lower cumulative medical burden in the geriatric population may benefit cognitive function. © 2017 Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Fan L.-Y.,En Chu Kong Hospital | Fan L.-Y.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Sun Y.,En Chu Kong Hospital | Lee H.-J.,Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background Evidence of an association between lifestyle and marital status and risk of dementia is limited in Asia. Methods In this nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 counties in Taiwan. A total of 10432 residents were assessed by a door-to-door in-person survey, among whom 7035 were normal and 929 were diagnosed with dementia using the criteria recommended by National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association. Premorbid lifestyle habits and demographic data including marital status were compared between normal subjects and participants with dementia. Results After adjustment for age, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, drinking, marital status, sleep habits, exercise, social engagement and co-morbidities including hypertension, diabetes and cerebrovascular diseases, an increased risk for dementia was found in people with widow or widower status (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.77) and people who used to take a nap in the afternoon (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.72). Decreased risk was found in people with the habit of regular exercise (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.09-0.16), adequate night sleep (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39-0.76) and regular social engagement (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.77). Conclusions Our results provide preliminary evidence of possible risk-reduction effects for dementia, including regular exercise even in modest amounts, social engagement and adequate night sleep, whereas people with the widow/widower status or who used to take an afternoon nap might have increased risk of dementia. © 2015 Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Sun Y.,En Chu Kong Hospital | Sun Y.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Lee H.-J.,Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association | Yang S.-C.,Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

An increasing population of dementia patients produces substantial societal impacts. We assessed the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and all-cause dementia, including very mild dementia (VMD), in Taiwan. In a nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 Taiwan counties and were enrolled between December 2011 and March 2013. Cases were identified through in-person interviews based on the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association clinical criteria. Demographic data and histories involving mental status and function in daily living were collected. The principal objective assessments were the Taiwanese Mental Status Examination and Clinical Dementia Rating. In all, 10,432 people aged 65 years or older (mean age 76.2±6.7, 52.3% women) were interviewed. The age-adjusted prevalence of all-cause dementia was 8.04% (95% CI 7.47-8.61), including a 3.25% (95% CI 2.89-3.61) prevalence of VMD; that of MCI was 18.76% (95% CI 17.91-19.61). Women had a higher prevalence than men of both all-cause dementia (9.71% vs. 6.36%) and MCI (21.63% vs. 15.57%). MCI affects a considerable portion of the population aged 65 and above in Taiwan. The inclusion of VMD yields dementia prevalence rates higher than those previously reported from Taiwan. Old age, female gender, and a low educational level are significant associated factors. © 2014 Sun et al.


PubMed | Chang Gung University, Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association, Soochow University of Taiwan, National Yang Ming University and National Taiwan University Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

An increasing population of dementia patients produces substantial societal impacts. We assessed the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and all-cause dementia, including very mild dementia (VMD), in Taiwan. In a nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 Taiwan counties and were enrolled between December 2011 and March 2013. Cases were identified through in-person interviews based on the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimers Association clinical criteria. Demographic data and histories involving mental status and function in daily living were collected. The principal objective assessments were the Taiwanese Mental Status Examination and Clinical Dementia Rating. In all, 10,432 people aged 65 years or older (mean age 76.2 6.7, 52.3% women) were interviewed. The age-adjusted prevalence of all-cause dementia was 8.04% (95% CI 7.47-8.61), including a 3.25% (95% CI 2.89-3.61) prevalence of VMD; that of MCI was 18.76% (95% CI 17.91-19.61). Women had a higher prevalence than men of both all-cause dementia (9.71% vs. 6.36%) and MCI (21.63% vs. 15.57%). MCI affects a considerable portion of the population aged 65 and above in Taiwan. The inclusion of VMD yields dementia prevalence rates higher than those previously reported from Taiwan. Old age, female gender, and a low educational level are significant associated factors.


PubMed | Taiwan Alzheimers Disease Association, En Chu Kong Hospital, Chung Gung University, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Taiwan University Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Evidence of an association between lifestyle and marital status and risk of dementia is limited in Asia.In this nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 counties in Taiwan. A total of 10432 residents were assessed by a door-to-door in-person survey, among whom 7035 were normal and 929 were diagnosed with dementia using the criteria recommended by National Institute on Aging-Alzheimers Association. Premorbid lifestyle habits and demographic data including marital status were compared between normal subjects and participants with dementia.After adjustment for age, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, drinking, marital status, sleep habits, exercise, social engagement and co-morbidities including hypertension, diabetes and cerebrovascular diseases, an increased risk for dementia was found in people with widow or widower status (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.77) and people who used to take a nap in the afternoon (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.72). Decreased risk was found in people with the habit of regular exercise (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.09-0.16), adequate night sleep (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39-0.76) and regular social engagement (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.77).Our results provide preliminary evidence of possible risk-reduction effects for dementia, including regular exercise even in modest amounts, social engagement and adequate night sleep, whereas people with the widow/widower status or who used to take an afternoon nap might have increased risk of dementia.

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