Taipei, Taiwan
Taipei, Taiwan

Time filter

Source Type

Chin S.-C.,Taipei Zoo | Lien C.-Y.,Taipei Zoo | Chan Y.-T.,Taipei Zoo | Chen C.-L.,Taipei Zoo | Yang Y.-C.,Taipei Zoo
Zoo Biology | Year: 2012

Eight species of pangolin have been identified in the world. However, understanding of pangolin reproductive biology has been limited to fragmentary records. In this study, the concentration of serum progesterone in three pregnant and two nonpregnant rescued female Formosan pangolins (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla) was monitored using a commercial progesterone radioimmunoassay kit. During gestation, the serum progesterone of pregnant pangolins A, B, and C remained at 28.5-55ng/ml (n = 31 samples), 10.9-50.1ng/ml (n = 34), and 12.4 and 33.5ng/ml with a peak at 47.6ng/ml (n = 19), respectively, whereas the serum progesterone of nonpregnant pangolins D and E remained at 1.99 ± 1.62ng/ml (n = 80) and 2.27 ± 1.64ng/ml (n = 27), respectively. From this study, it was found that female pangolin weighing as low as 2.14kg was already capable of reproduction. For pregnant pangolins to give birth to viable offspring, their body weight must increase significantly, 63.89 and 134.0% in the study, from the time of inception or early pregnancy until parturition. In addition, study has found that both viable offspring were born fully developed and exceeded 80g in weight. The period of gestation was found to be as short as 318 or longer than 372 days. Therefore, the Formosan pangolin should only be able to reproduce once a year. This study is the first insight into hormone assay for determining the gestation period of pangolin. Further investigations on the same subject are necessary to establish criteria for the recognition of reproductive status in pangolins. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Chan Y.-C.,Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | Roos C.,German Primate Center | Inoue-Murayama M.,Kyoto University | Inoue E.,Kyoto University | And 2 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2012

Background: The evolutionary relationships of closely related species have long been of interest to biologists since these species experienced different evolutionary processes in a relatively short period of time. Comparison of phylogenies inferred from DNA sequences with differing inheritance patterns, such as mitochondrial, autosomal, and X and Y chromosomal loci, can provide more comprehensive inferences of the evolutionary histories of species. Gibbons, especially the genus Hylobates, are particularly intriguing as they consist of multiple closely related species which emerged rapidly and live in close geographic proximity. Our current understanding of relationships among Hylobates species is largely based on data from the maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs). Results: To infer the paternal histories of gibbon taxa, we sequenced multiple Y chromosomal loci from 26 gibbons representing 10 species. As expected, we find levels of sequence variation some five times lower than observed for the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome). Although our Y chromosome phylogenetic tree shows relatively low resolution compared to the mtgenome tree, our results are consistent with the monophyly of gibbon genera suggested by the mtgenome tree. In a comparison of the molecular dating of divergences and on the branching patterns of phylogeny trees between mtgenome and Y chromosome data, we found: 1) the inferred divergence estimates were more recent for the Y chromosome than for the mtgenome, 2) the species H. lar and H. pileatus are monophyletic in the mtgenome phylogeny, respectively, but a H. pileatus individual falls into the H. lar Y chromosome clade. Conclusions: Based on the ∼6.4 kb of Y chromosomal DNA sequence data generated for each of the 26 individuals in this study, we provide molecular inferences on gibbon and particularly on Hylobates evolution complementary to those from mtDNA data. Overall, our results illustrate the utility of comparative studies of loci with different inheritance patterns for investigating potential sex specific processes on the evolutionary histories of closely related taxa, and emphasize the need for further sampling of gibbons of known provenance. © 2012 Chan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Kuraishi N.,Kyoto University | Matsui M.,Kyoto University | Ota H.,University of Hyogo | Chen S.-L.,Taipei Zoo
Zootaxa | Year: 2011

The Taiwan population of the Polypedates leucomystax complex has been assigned to P. megacephalus, which was orig-inally described from Hong Kong. The Taiwan and Hong Kong populations, however, are markedly differentiated in DNA sequences, and advertisement call and morphological characteristics. The Taiwan population is therefore regarded as a distinct species, for which the name P. braueri (Vogt 1911) is available. Since the holotype of P. braueri was not desig-nated, a lectotype is chosen among the nine syntypes examined. Copyright © 2011 Magnolia Press.


Chan Y.-C.,Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | Roos C.,German Primate Center | Inoue-Murayama M.,Kyoto University | Inoue E.,Kyoto University | And 3 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2013

Background: Gibbons (Hylobatidae) are the most diverse group of living apes. They exist as geographically-contiguous species which diverged more rapidly than did their close relatives, the great apes (Hominidae). Of the four extant gibbon genera, the evolutionary histories of two polyspecific genera, Hylobates and Nomascus, have been the particular focus of research but the DNA sequence data used was largely derived from the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus. Results: To investigate the evolutionary relationships and divergence processes of gibbon species, particularly those of the Hylobates genus, we produced and analyzed a total of 11.5 kb DNA of sequence at 14 biparentally inherited autosomal loci. We find that on average gibbon genera have a high average sequence diversity but a lower degree of genetic differentiation as compared to great ape genera. Our multilocus species tree features H. pileatus in a basal position and a grouping of the four Sundaic island species (H. agilis, H. klossii, H. moloch and H. muelleri). We conducted pairwise comparisons based on an isolation-with-migration (IM) model and detect signals of asymmetric gene flow between H. lar and H. moloch, between H. agilis and H. muelleri, and between N. leucogenys and N. siki. Conclusions: Our multilocus analyses provide inferences of gibbon evolutionary histories complementary to those based on single gene data. The results of IM analyses suggest that the divergence processes of gibbons may be accompanied by gene flow. Future studies using analyses of multi-population model with samples of known provenance for Hylobates and Nomascus species would expand the understanding of histories of gene flow during divergences for these two gibbon genera. © 2013 Chan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Jang-Liaw N.-H.,Taipei Zoo | Jang-Liaw N.-H.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Wen Z.-H.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Chen I.-S.,National Taiwan Ocean University
Mitochondrial DNA | Year: 2016

Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of endangered minnow, Metzia mesembrinum, which collected from Kimnen island, Fujian Province of Taiwan. The circular mitogenome (16,603 bp) consists of 13 protein coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement. The overall base composition in descending order is A (32.0%), T (27.1%), C (25.2%), G (15.7%) with rather higher AT content as 59.1%. Yuan et al. reported the complete mitogenome (KF997093) of M. mesembrimum from southern China that may belong to other congeneric species, but not exactly M. mesembrinum collected from either southern Fujian or Taiwan. The well-identified species sequence data of Metzia mesembrinum would be rather beneficial for further phlyogenetic approach for congeneric species in East and Southeast Asia. © 2014 Informa UK Ltd.


Chan Y.-C.,Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | Roos C.,German Primate Center | Inoue-Murayama M.,Kyoto University | Inoue E.,Kyoto University | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

Background: Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. Methodology/Principal Findings: We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus) using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining) depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. Conclusions/Significance: Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b) as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species. © 2010 Chan et al.


PubMed | University of Texas at Austin, Seoul National University, Moscow State University, CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences and 7 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Systematic biology | Year: 2016

True frogs of the genus Rana are widely used as model organisms in studies of development, genetics, physiology, ecology, behavior, and evolution. Comparative studies among the more than 100 species of Rana rely on an understanding of the evolutionary history and patterns of diversification of the group. We estimate a well-resolved, time-calibrated phylogeny from sequences of six nuclear and three mitochondrial loci sampled from most species of Rana, and use that phylogeny to clarify the groups diversification and global biogeography. Our analyses consistently support an Out of Asia pattern with two independent dispersals of Rana from East Asia to North America via Beringian land bridges. The more species-rich lineage of New World Rana appears to have experienced a rapid radiation following its colonization of the New World, especially with its expansion into montane and tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and South America. In contrast, Old World Rana exhibit different trajectories of diversification; diversification in the Old World began very slowly and later underwent a distinct increase in speciation rate around 29-18 Ma. Net diversification is associated with environmental changes and especially intensive tectonic movements along the Asian margin from the Oligocene to early Miocene. Our phylogeny further suggests that previous classifications were misled by morphological homoplasy and plesiomorphic color patterns, as well as a reliance primarily on mitochondrial genes. We provide a phylogenetic taxonomy based on analyses of multiple nuclear and mitochondrial gene loci. [Amphibians; biogeography; diversification rate; Holarctic; transcontinental dispersal.


PubMed | National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Ellen S. Dierenfeld LLC and Taipei Zoo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zoo biology | Year: 2015

Pangolins are considered difficult to maintain in zoos, often attributed to problems in feeding management. Taipei Zoos designation as a wildlife rescue center for Chinese pangolins (Manis pentadactyla) has resulted in long term feeding experience with development of diets that support recovery, maintenance, and reproduction, as well as experimental opportunities to further understand digestive physiology to optimize nutrition. Opportunistic dissection of 10 animals revealed details of the tongue, salivary glands, stomach and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including confirmation of anatomical differences between Asian and African pangolin species. Length of the total GIT relative to body length ( 9:1) was greater than found in domestic carnivores, more similar to omnivorous species. Intake and digestion trials conducted with 4 animals demonstrated that pangolins maintained body weights (BW; 6-9kg) consuming diets containing 32-40% crude protein, 20-25% crude fat, and 13-28% crude fiber (DM basis). Daily DM intakes ranged from 40 to 70g per animal, with digestible energy intake 51.5-87.5kcal /kg BW(0.75) /day; pangolins consumed 9.4-15.2g DM/kg BW(0.75) /day. Dietary energy data support observations of low metabolism and maintenance requirements for this species, similar to values reported for other myrmecophageous species. Addition of 5% ground chitin to diets improved fecal consistency, and decreased digestibility of DM, protein, and energy; addition of chitosan (chitin treated with NaOH) resulted in diet rejection. This information may assist in enhancement of captive diets, as well as in controlling obesity in pangolins.


PubMed | National Taiwan Ocean University and Taipei Zoo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mitochondrial DNA. Part A, DNA mapping, sequencing, and analysis | Year: 2015

Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of endangered minnow, Metzia mesembrinum, which collected from Kimnen island, Fujian Province of Taiwan. The circular mitogenome (16,603 bp) consists of 13 protein coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement. The overall base composition in descending order is A (32.0%), T (27.1%), C (25.2%), G (15.7%) with rather higher AT content as 59.1%. Yuan et al. reported the complete mitogenome (KF997093) of M. mesembrimum from southern China that may belong to other congeneric species, but not exactly M. mesembrinum collected from either southern Fujian or Taiwan. The well-identified species sequence data of Metzia mesembrinum would be rather beneficial for further phlyogenetic approach for congeneric species in East and Southeast Asia.


PubMed | Ueno Zoological Gardens, Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, Wildlife Nutrition Center, Taipei Zoo and Save Vietnams Wildlife
Type: | Journal: Zoo biology | Year: 2017

Pangolins are ant specialists which are under intense threat from the illegal wildlife trade. Nutrition has notoriously been their downfall in captivity and is still an issue in regards to rescue and rehabilitation. We analyzed the nutrient content of diets used by institutions that are successfully keeping Asian pangolins and to assess the variety of the ingredients and nutrients, compared these with the nutritional requirements of potential nutritional model species. We performed intake studies at five institutions and also had data from three other institutions. We also analyzed five different wild food items to use as a proxy of wild diet. We observed two categories of captive diets: those mostly or completely composed of insects and those high in commercial feeds or animal meat. Nutrient values were broad and there was no clear rule. The non-protein energy to protein energy ratio of the diets were much higher than the wild food items, more so for those which receive less insects. The average contribution of carbohydrate, fat, and protein energy were also further away from the wild samples the less insects they contained. The previously suggested nutritional model for pangolins is the domestic dog which is supported by our relatively large nutrient ranges of apparently successful diets, however, due to their highly carnivorous nature; the upper most nutrient intake data are not consistent with this and favor the feline nutrient recommendations. We are unable to render a conclusion of what model is more appropriate based on our data collected.

Loading Taipei Zoo collaborators
Loading Taipei Zoo collaborators