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Zheng Z.-C.,Taian Central Hospital | Wei K.-B.,Taian Central Hospital | Liu F.,Taian Central Hospital | Liu C.,Taian Disabled Soldiers Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: A series of basic researches have confirmed that, the olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation can promote spinal cord regeneration and recover some neurological functions of spinal cord in animal models of spinal cord injury. Some clinical trials also prove that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells can indeed improve neurological function in patients with spinal cord injury, and then improve their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effectiveness and safety of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation in repair of neurological function of spinal cord injury patients. METHODS: The aborted embryonic olfactory bulb was collected and digested into single olfactory ensheathing cells. After they were cultured and purified 2 weeks, olfactory ensheathing cell suspension was prepared. A total of 213 cases of spinal cord injury were selected. Under general anesthesia, the prepared olfactory ensheathing cell suspension was injected through several target sites surrounding the injured spinal cord. ASIA scale was used to assay the patients before transplantation, 3 weeks to 2 months after transplantation, so as to evaluate spinal cord recovery. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The spinal cord nerve function in all patients altered to different degrees at 3 weeks postoperation. Spinal cord function score, the sensory and motor functions were significantly increased compared with preoperation (P < 0.001), and showed a trend of continuous improvement with time; the patients were visited as follow-up for no more than 5 years, and no impairment of the restored nervous function or transplant adverse reactions were observed. It is confirmed that olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation can promote the recovery of nerve function in patients with spinal cord injury, it can restore and improve some spinal cord functions, and the treatment is safe.


Yang B.,Jining First Peoples Hospital | Xu X.-D.,Taian Disabled Soldiers Hospital | Gao P.,Jining First Peoples Hospital | Yu J.-X.,Jining First Peoples Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Medical Science Monitor | Year: 2016

Background: There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods: Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results: The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions: Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. © Med Sci Monit.


PubMed | Taian Disabled Soldiers Hospital and Jining First Peoples Hospital
Type: | Journal: Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. RESULTS The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis.

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