T. J. Mccann And Associates

Calgary, Canada

T. J. Mccann And Associates

Calgary, Canada
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News Article | July 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Devika Bulchandani, Managing Director, McCann New York, said, "We are thrilled and honored to be awarded creative and strategic responsibilities for HomeGoods. We look forward to working with them to help build their brand and connect with their customers in new ways." The account assignment, which follows a competitive review, comes as part of HomeGoods's overall effort to continue its advertising and marketing activities to further reach and engage customers. "McCann brings proven strategic and integrated marketing expertise that will help us build a strong communications platform to deliver innovative, creative work that will resonate with our customers and help us stand apart in the marketplace," stated Emily Trent, Vice President, Marketing Director, HomeGoods. McCann is part of McCann Worldgroup. McCann Worldgroup, part of the Interpublic Group (NYSE: IPG), is a leading global marketing services company with 24,000 employees in more than 100 countries, comprising McCann (advertising), MRM//McCann (digital marketing/relationship management), Momentum Worldwide (total brand experience), McCann Health (professional/dtc communications), CRAFT (global adaptation and production), UM (media management), Weber Shandwick (public relations), FutureBrand (consulting/design), ChaseDesign (shopper marketing) and PMK-BNC (popular culture and entertainment management).


News Article | June 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"With its growing portfolio of destinations, it's an exciting time to be tasked with raising the profile of the already iconic MGM brand," said Devika Bulchandani, Managing Director, McCann NY & President, McCann XBC. "We look forward to developing fresh, innovative creative to tell MGM's story as the leading entertainment brand—both inside and outside of Vegas." "We have been focused on reinventing ourselves around entertainment with a strategy that takes that model to a whole new level," said Lilian Tomovich, Chief Experience and Marketing Officer, MGM Resorts International. "Following the successful launch of MGM National Harbor, we look forward to expanding our relationship with McCann to drive experience and entertainment at both our new and existing regional brands." McCann is a unit of McCann Worldgroup. McCann Worldgroup, part of the Interpublic Group (NYSE: IPG), is a leading global marketing services company with 24,000 employees in more than 100 countries, comprising McCann (advertising), MRM//McCann (digital marketing/relationship management), Momentum Worldwide (total brand experience), McCann Health (professional/dtc communications), CRAFT (global adaptation and production), UM (media management), Weber Shandwick (public relations), FutureBrand (consulting/design), ChaseDesign (shopper marketing) and PMK-BNC (entertainment/brand/popular culture). MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) is one of the world's leading global hospitality companies, operating a portfolio of destination resort brands including Bellagio, MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay and The Mirage. The Company opened MGM National Harbor in Maryland on December 8, 2016, and is in the process of developing MGM Springfield in Massachusetts. MGM Resorts controls and holds a 76 percent economic interest in the operating partnership of MGM Growth Properties LLC (NYSE: MGP), a premier triple-net lease real estate investment trust engaged in the acquisition, ownership and leasing of large-scale destination entertainment and leisure resorts. The Company also owns 56 percent of MGM China Holdings Limited (SEHK: 2282), which owns MGM MACAU and is developing MGM COTAI, and 50 percent of CityCenter in Las Vegas, which features ARIA Resort & Casino. MGM Resorts is named among FORTUNE® Magazine's 2017 list of World's Most Admired Companies®.  For more information about MGM Resorts International, visit the Company's website at www.mgmresorts.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mgm-resorts-international-expands-relationship-with-mccann-300467570.html


News Article | August 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"McCann offered extensive experience and created a custom-built team to meet our needs, including expert resources from their national and global network. Their collective passion for our brand, relevant experience and the high level strategic thinking that they brought to the pitch process was unmatched," said Stéphanie Laforest, Senior Director, Corporate Strategy, Bombardier Inc. "The bonus was having all that talent and ability on the ground in Montréal coupled with insights and resources from the global network that we can leverage for our international business units.  Their expertise, from brand strategy through to connections planning and integrated creative solutions, put them on top and won them the business." Everywhere people travel by land and in the air, a Bombardier product is ready to transport them.  From category-defining business jets and commercial aircraft designed for the challenges of today, to sleek high-speed trains and public transit that's smarter than ever.  It is not just products and services that make Bombardier a global leader, but the 66,000 employees that they employ around the world and here at home in Canada. "We wanted this win more than anything. Our team is passionate about the brand and proud that Bombardier, a pioneer in its field, is a recognized global leader. Our agency's longstanding heritage in Montréal and our access to experts and on-the-ground resources in the international markets where Bombardier operates, are the perfect complement to their business," said Mylène Savoie, President, McCann Montréal.  "We firmly believe that the intersection between global and local is a huge opportunity for our clients in Montréal.  Brands now have access to the most innovative media, technologies, experiences and creativity from around the world through our increased access to the McCann Worldgroup network." McCann has several offices across Canada, including an experienced team of more than 50 local market experts across multiple disciplines in Montréal. Established in 1918, the Montréal office has been creating unique market campaigns for local Québec brands and national and global brands, and is a true pillar of the Québec agency landscape. McCann Canada was awarded the business earlier this week and begins work on the mandate immediately. About Bombardier Bombardier is the world's leading manufacturer of both planes and trains.  Looking far ahead while delivering today, Bombardier is evolving mobility worldwide by answering the call for more efficient, sustainable and enjoyable transportation everywhere.  Our vehicles, services and, most of all, our employees are what make us a global leader in transportation. Bombardier is headquartered in Montréal, Canada.  Our shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (BBD) and we are listed on the Dow Jones Sustainability North America Index.  In the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, we posted revenues of $16.3 billion.  News and information are available at bombardier.com or follow us on Twitter @Bombardier. About McCann McCann is an integrated marketing communications agency with offices in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and Montréal. The agency has been continuously ranked among the top in Canada since 1915. McCann creates meaningful roles for brands in people's lives and improves the performance and influence of their clients.  mccann.ca About McCann Worldgroup McCann Worldgroup, part of the Interpublic Group (NYSE: IPG), is a leading global marketing services company with 24,000 employees in more than 100 countries, comprising McCann  (advertising), MRM//McCann (digital marketing/relationship management), Momentum Worldwide (total brand experience), McCann Health (professional/dtc communications), CRAFT (global adaptation and production), UM (media management), Weber Shandwick (public relations), FutureBrand (consulting/design), ChaseDesign (shopper marketing) and PMK-BNC (entertainment/brand/popular culture).


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Just a few years ago this place had no name. And in fact its new moniker – Hadabaun Hills – is the sole creation of Indonesian conservationist Haray Sam Munthe. Hadabaun means “fall” in the local language – Munthe suffered a terrible one in these hills while looking for tigers in 2013. But Hadabaun or Fall Hills remains unrecognised by the Indonesian governments and is a blank spot on the world’s maps – though it may be one of the last great refuges for big mammals on the island of Sumatra. Last year a ragtag, independent group of local and international conservationists, led by Munthe and Greg McCann of Habitat ID, used camera traps to confirm Sumatran tigers and Malayan tapirs in these hills. Next month they hope to uncover a lost population of Sumatran orangutans. “I’d call it a Noah’s Ark for endangered and critically endangered species amidst an ocean of palm oil plantations,” said Greg McCann, the Project Coordinator for Habitat ID. McCann, an American who lives in Taiwan, spends much of his time swashbuckling Indiana Jones-style across south-east Asia’s last remaining – and highly threatened – rainforests. It’s a passion with a purpose: McCann’s group, Habitat ID, is working to document rare species in a bid to convince governments, NGOs and the public to care about long-overlooked forests. “Not so long ago nearly the entire island of Sumatra was blanketed in tropical rainforest. Today the mountain ranges that are too steep for big plantations are the default wildlife refuges, relics of the once great forests that were never documented by science,” McCann said. “This is where wildlife makes its last stand.” Sumatra has changed remarkably in the last few decades, from an island of villages and wilderness to one of vast monoculture plantations of pulp and paper and palm oil. Since 1985 the island has lost more than half its lowland forest, and it continues to have one of the highest deforestation rates on the planet. Its large mammals – many of which are found nowhere else in the world – have undergone a severe contraction, leaving them at risk of total extinction. McCann first visited the Hadabaun Hills in 2016 after being invited by Munthe. In a short trip the pair saw siamang (the world’s biggest gibbons), lar gibbons, rhinoceros hornbills, Oriental pied hornbills and Argus pheasant, among other species. But it was the two camera traps – just two – that they left behind that really proved the promise of Hadabaun Hills. In just one month they photographed their first Malayan tapir, a species categorised as endangered on the IUCN Red List with its population believed to have dropped by more than half in the last 36 years. And in three months’ time a Sumtran tiger posed for the camera. Fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers are believed to survive in the wild today and the species continues to be decimated by deforestation, snaring and poaching. Munthe runs the Sumatran Tiger Rangers, a group working to protect the top predator by removing snares, and working to mitigate human-tiger conflict. This is Indonesia’s last tiger: the Javan went extinct in the 1970s. The team’s camera traps also photographed golden cat, sun bear, Malayan porcupine, Sumatran porcupine, wild pig and pig-tailed macaque, proving the area is bursting with threatened Sumatran mammals. This year McCann and Munthe plan to trek far further into a mountaintop forest dubbed the “extreme area” by Munthe. First they will take a boat to the bottom of the hills and then cut their way through the forest to reach a little village where they hope to convince a local to guide them to the top of the mountains. “We’ll be likely bushwhacking to this hamlet and startling the local residents with a small contingent of bu-lays [the local name for foreigners] emerging wet and muddy from nearby jungle for the first time ever,” McCann said. “I expect to see children scattering in every direction and to hear Siamangs and hornbills in the forest beyond. After the hamlet we are in terra incognita.” They plan to spend seven days trekking into and through the “extreme area”. Beyond local people, few – if any – have ever been here, but it’s this high-altitude forest that may be home to an undiscovered population of Sumatran orangutans. These great apes – a different species from those in Borneo – are classified as critically endangered and have a total population of around 14,000. Since Sumatran orangutans rarely, if ever, touch down from the trees, McCann and Munthe don’t expect to catch them on camera. Instead they hope to find orangutan nests, photograph them, and bring back the images for confirmation by experts. The team also hopes a new army of camera traps will document the Sunda clouded leopard, dholes, the helmeted hornbill, the Sumatran striped rabbit and the Sumatran muntjac, a type of small deer that McCann describes as so rare as to be “ near-mythical”. “There’s even a very slim possibility of finding Sumatran rhinoceros,” McCann said. “Last year we camped on a plateau at about 600 metres that went by the name of Rhinoceros Hill. Historically, there were rhinos in this region. When did the last one get poached out? Probably nobody knows.” Pretty much every big mammal in Sumatra is threatened, but Sumatran rhinos have the terrible honour of being one of the rarest mammals on the planet: less than 100 survive today. And a subspecies found in Borneo is on the verge of total extinction. Munthe said that in his explorations he has found rhino dung in the Hadabaun Hills. Confirming rhinos there would be a major boon to a species so close to vanishing. Indeed, Hadabaun Hills remains a land so removed it’s full of rumours. Munthe said locals claim to run into a “large black monkey” in the hills. There is also talk of a mythical tribe of humans known as the Suke Mante in this area. Munthe was also told by a local that at the top of the mountain lives a “black-furred, orangutan-like creature walks on two legs”. Historically there have been numerous reports of an unidentified ape in Sumatra called the “orang pendek”, which is similar to an orangutan but smaller with brown-to-black fur and a penchant for walking on the ground. But no one has brought back any real proof of his legendary animal – and many believe that even if such an animal ever existed it has likely been wiped out in Sumatra’s ecological catastrophe. None of the Hadabaun Hills is formally protected. About half the area is considered community forest and the other has no status, according to McCann. On the ground, he said, it didn’t matter what was community-run and what remained without any formal status. “It’s all under threat from agricultural encroachment, logging, road building, snaring – all the usual suspects.” McCann and Munthe asked that the exact location of the Hadabaun Hills remain unpublished due to concerns that such information could lead to an increase in poachers. Munthe said he feared poachers were already entering this lost world. “I have mentioned the Hadabuan Hills and its scarce animals to the forestry minister and the head of the district administration. Until now there is no help to protect [the Hadabaun Hills] from the government,” Munthe said. Most of the world’s biggest conservation groups have a presence in Sumatra – such as WWF, WCS, and Conservation International – but none of them have explored this particular forest. “Funding for new conservation projects seems difficult to come by, and in the past the large NGOs poured their time and money into places like Gunung Leuser National Park and Kerinci National Park – and with good reason,” McCann explained. “Those places are so important, so magical, and they need urgent protection.” But still McCann worries about a “curiosity crisis” in conservation today, pointing to the lack of interest in the Hadabaun Hills as an example. “Why aren’t scientists and conservationists seeking out these last holdouts?” he asks, noting tantalisingly that Hadabaun Hills isn’t the only unexplored area of Sumatra. “Sumatra is one of the last places where you can use Google Earth, zoom around on the map and wonder: ‘What might be lurking in there? It’s not a national park or a protected area. What’s in there?’ Nobody knows except the locals.” But McCann’s organisation, Habitat ID, almost had to cancel the expedition due to a lack of funding. Instead these rogue conservationists have decided to press ahead by paying for most the trip out of pocket and scaling back initial plans. All this despite the fact that the team had already documented tapirs and tigers in Hadaban Hills. McCann said the team was close to securing funding for the expedition until the donor asked to see government data on Hadabaun Hills. But, of course, there is none. “That’s the reason why we want to explore it – it’s an empty page for wildlife surveying,” said McCann. Without more funding, the team is left self-funding the bulk of the trip and missing out on the potential of bringing more camera traps to increase their chance of documenting rare or even new species. A struggle to secure funding is not new to McCann, who ran into the same issue when trying to document wildlife in Virachey National Park in Cambodia. McCann was able to prove that Virachey was home to many threatened mammals, including elephants, even though big conservation groups had largely abandoned the park. “I think that money will only go where money is,” McCann said. “Few want to go it alone; it’s seen as being too risky … if another NGO is already working there and you can collaborate and share, then your chances of landing funding shoot up. So places that enjoy some level of NGO support will get more support, and ones that don’t will languish.” But such shortsightedness means that exploratory expeditions have trouble getting off the ground and small NGOs like McCann’s – with far less overhead and often a larger penchant for risk-taking – struggle to find the funds to survive. “We really had the wind taken out of our sails on this when we didn’t get the funding and it almost killed the project,” McCann said. But he is now turning to crowdfunding in a bid to raise some extra funds for more camera trapping on their trip. In our age there are fewer and fewer places like Hadabuan Hills – newly named, wholly unexplored – yet that’s the draw for adventurers and conservationists like McCann and Munthe. “When you trek up into the inmost heart of the mountains like we will be doing, and in an untrodden area such as this, mysteries may reveal themselves,” McCann said. It sounds like language out of another time, another age: but for all our hubris our little planet – third from the sun – remains full of mysteries. Most of the species on Earth have never been documented or named by scientists and there are places – even on an island like Sumatra which has one of the highest deforestation rates in the world – where every turn, every snapshot of a camera trap, could reveal a new world.


Zhang Y.,Carnegie Mellon University | Padman R.,Carnegie Mellon University | Patel N.,T. J. Mccann And Associates
Journal of Biomedical Informatics | Year: 2015

Objective: Clinical pathways translate best available evidence into practice, indicating the most widely applicable order of treatment interventions for particular treatment goals. We propose a practice-based clinical pathway development process and a data-driven methodology for extracting common clinical pathways from electronic health record (EHR) data that is patient-centered, consistent with clinical workflow, and facilitates evidence-based care. Materials and methods: Visit data of 1,576 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients who developed acute kidney injury (AKI) from 2009 to 2013 are extracted from the EHR. We model each patient's multi-dimensional clinical records into one-dimensional sequences using novel constructs designed to capture information on each visit's purpose, procedures, medications and diagnoses. Analysis and clustering on visit sequences identify distinct types of patient subgroups. Characterizing visit sequences as Markov chains, significant transitions are extracted and visualized into clinical pathways across subgroups. Results: We identified 31 patient subgroups whose extracted clinical pathways provide insights on how patients' conditions and medication prescriptions may progress over time. We identify pathways that show typical disease progression, practices that are consistent with guidelines, and sustainable improvements in patients' health conditions. Visualization of pathways depicts the likelihood and direction of disease progression under varied contexts. Discussion and conclusions: Accuracy of EHR data and diversity in patients' conditions and practice patterns are critical challenges in learning insightful practice-based clinical pathways. Learning and visualizing clinical pathways from actual practice data captured in the EHR may facilitate efficient practice review by healthcare providers and support patient engagement in shared decision making. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Zhang Y.,Carnegie Mellon University | Padman R.,Carnegie Mellon University | Wasserman L.,Carnegie Mellon University | Patel N.,T. J. Mccann And Associates | And 2 more authors.
IEEE Intelligent Systems | Year: 2015

In this column, the authors propose a practice-based clinical pathway development process using patient data from electronic health records. The authors aim to examine the interaction between patients' health conditions and treatment approaches, and learn the most common pathways of care to inform better patient engagement and outcomes in healthcare practices. © 2001-2011 IEEE.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

NEW YORK, Dec. 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Closing out a record-breaking year, McCann New York today announced that SHOOT Magazine has named it "Agency of the Year." SHOOT attributes the win to the agency's "penchant for breaking down barriers, bringing people together in a shared...


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The world’s oldest banana brand Fyffes is to be sold to Japanese giant Sumitomo for €751m (£630m), resulting in a big payout for the McCann family, one of Ireland’s most prominent business dynasties. The deal brings together the two largest banana distributors in Asia and Europe. The McCann family, whose links with Dublin-based Fyffes date back to 1902, has agreed to sell its 11.79% stake in the Irish fruit supplier, worth nearly €87.5m. The South-Carolina based Zucker family is in line for a similar payout for its 11.83% stake. The two families and other shareholders will receive €2.23 per share in cash as well as a final dividend of two cents a share. The Irish company has recommended the deal to investors and 27% have already backed it. David McCann, executive chairman of Fyffes, said the offer was compelling. “Our employees, customers, suppliers and joint venture partners will benefit from Fyffes being part of an enlarged group with greater scale, reach and resources to broaden and accelerate delivery of Fyffes’ strategic objectives.” The takeover comes two years after Fyffes and US rival Chiquita abandoned plans for a merger that would have created the world’s largest banana company. Since then, Fyffes has been on an acquisition trail and recently added mushroom businesses to its portfolio of bananas, melons and pineapples. McCann told the Irish Times that the deal was discussed at a dinner with Sumitomo executives at the Merrion hotel in Dublin two months ago. “When discussions like this begin, you can never predict how they’re going to finish,” he said, “but this is a good transaction for our shareholders and for our people, as we expect the business as a whole to remain intact.” He said he would “stay for a period”. The business has come a long way since 1902 when McCann’s grandfather Charles set up a fruit and veg shop in Dundalk and became the first agent in Ireland for Fyffes, a then-London-based banana importer. Fyffes began in 1888 when Edward Fyffe, a tea importer, went into partnership with a fruit distributor, James Hudson, and started shipping bananas from the Canary Islands to London. The McCanns built up their business and it became known as Fruit Importers of Ireland, which floated on the Irish stock exchange in 1981 and bought Fyffes five years later. Hirohiko Imura, managing executive officer of Sumitomo, said: “We are grateful that the McCann family has provided an irrevocable commitment of support and is entrusting us to continue with them the rich Fyffes heritage. Sumitomo will provide Fyffes with experience, support and investment to continue to build on the tremendous Fyffes skills and experience and reach greater potential.”

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