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Nishi-Tokyo-shi, Japan

Imai K.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency | Manago N.,Chiba University | Mitsuda C.,Fujitsu FIP Corporation | Naito Y.,Kyoto University | And 27 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres | Year: 2013

The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station provided global measurements of ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere from 12 October 2009 to 21 April 2010. We present validation studies of the SMILES version 2.1 ozone product based on coincidence statistics with satellite observations and outputs of chemistry and transport models (CTMs). Comparisons of the stratospheric ozone with correlative data show agreements that are generally within 10%. In the mesosphere, the agreement is also good and better than 30% even at a high altitude of 73 km, and the SMILES measurements with their local time coverage also capture the diurnal variability very well. The recommended altitude range for scientific use is from 16 to 73 km. We note that the SMILES ozone values for altitude above 26 km are smaller than some of the correlative satellite datasets; conversely the SMILES values in the lower stratosphere tend to be larger than correlative data, particularly in the tropics, with less than 8% difference below ∼24 km. The larger values in the lower stratosphere are probably due to departure of retrieval results between two detection bands at altitudes below 28 km; it is ∼3% at 24 km and is increasing rapidly down below. © 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Kunitake M.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Yamamoto K.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Watari S.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Ukawa K.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | And 5 more authors.
Data Science Journal | Year: 2013

Cross-sectional studies have become important for an improved understanding of various Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP) fields, given the great variety and different types of observations from the Sun to the Earth. In order to better combine, compare, and analyze different types of data together, a system named STARS (Solar-Terrestrial data Analysis and Reference System) has been developed. Cross-sectional study requires cooperative work. STARS has two functions for cooperative work, the "Stars Project List (SPL)" and the "Event Listing". The SPL is used for exchanges of plotting information by cooperating persons. The event list database provides all users of STARS hints for recognizing typical occurrences of STP phenomena.


Murata K.T.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Watari S.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Nagatsuma T.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | Kunitake M.,Japan National Institute of Information and Communications Technology | And 13 more authors.
Data Science Journal | Year: 2013

It is often discussed that the fourth methodology for science research is "informatics". The first methodology is a theoretic approach, the second one is observation and/or experiment, and the third one is computer simulation. Informatics is a new methodology for data intensive science, which is a new concept based on the fact that most scientific data are digitalized and the amount of data is huge. The facilities to support informatics are cloud systems. Herein we propose a cloud system especially designed for science. The basic concepts, design, resources, implementation, and applications of the NICT science cloud are discussed.

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