Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Salloum R.G.,University of South Carolina | Osman A.,University of South Carolina | Maziak W.,Florida International University | Maziak W.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies | Thrasher J.F.,University of South Carolina
Tobacco Control | Year: 2015

Objectives Waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS), a traditional tobacco consumption practice in the Middle East, is gaining popularity worldwide. Estimates of population-level interest in WTS over time are not documented. We assessed the popularity of WTS using World Wide Web search query results across four English-speaking countries. Methods We analysed trends in Google search queries related to WTS, comparing these trends with those for electronic cigarettes between 2004 and 2013 in Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA. Weekly search volumes were reported as percentages relative to the week with the highest volume of searches. Results Web-based searches for WTS have increased steadily since 2004 in all four countries. Search volume for WTS was higher than for e-cigarettes in three of the four nations, with the highest volume in the USA. Online searches were primarily targeted at WTS products for home use, followed by searches for WTS cafés/lounges. Conclusions Online demand for information on WTSrelated products and venues is large and increasing. Given the rise in WTS popularity, increasing evidence of exposure-related harms, and relatively lax government regulation, WTS is a serious public health concern and could reach epidemic levels in Western societies. © 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Salloum R.G.,University of South Carolina | Thrasher J.F.,University of South Carolina | Kates F.R.,University of South Carolina | Maziak W.,Florida International University | Maziak W.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies
Preventive Medicine | Year: 2015

Objective: To report prevalence and correlates of water pipe tobacco smoking (WTS) use among U.S. adults. Methods: Data were from the 2009-2010 National Adult Tobacco Survey, a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Estimates of WTS ever and current use were reported overall, and by sex, age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, annual household income, sexual orientation, and cigarette smoking status. State-level prevalence rates of WTS ever were reported using choropleth thematic maps for the overall population and by sex. Results: The national prevalence of WTS ever was 9.8% and 1.5% for current use. WTS ever was more prevalent among those who are male (13.4%), 18-24. years old (28.4%) compared to older adults, non-Hispanic White (9.8%) compared to non-Hispanic Black, with some college education (12.4%) compared to no high school diploma, and reporting sexual minority status (21.1%) compared to heterosexuals. States with highest prevalence included DC (17.3%), NV (15.8%), and CA (15.5%). Conclusion: WTS is now common among young adults in the US and high in regions where cigarette smoking prevalence is the lowest and smoke-free policies have a longer history. To reduce its use, WTS should be included in smoke-free regulations and state and federal regulators should consider policy development in other areas, including taxes, labeling, and distribution. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Maziak W.,Florida International University | Maziak W.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies
American Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2014

The recent popularity of electronic (e)-cigarettes and their rapid uptake by youth has ignited the debate about their role as a harm-reduction strategy. Harm reduction in the context of tobacco control contends that in societies that have achieved considerable success in curbing smoking, leaving the remaining hard-to-quit smokers with an abstinence-only option is unfair, especially when lessharmful choices are available. On one side of the debate are those who call for caution in endorsing such products until critical pieces of evidence about their safety and potential become available, whereas the other side argues that waiting until all questions about e-cigarettes are answered is dogma driven. In this piece, I try to discuss the unresolvable contention between harm-reduction goals of offering safer options to smokers, and those of e-cigarette makers of being commercially viable and profitable. © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.


Asfar T.,University of Miami | Al Ali R.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies | Rastam S.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies | Maziak W.,Florida International University | Ward K.D.,University of Memphis
Addictive Behaviors | Year: 2014

Background: Waterpipe use has increased dramatically in the Middle East and other parts of the world. Many users exhibit signs of dependence, including withdrawal and difficulty quitting, but there is no evidence base to guide cessation efforts. Methods: We developed a behavioral cessation program for willing-to-quit waterpipe users, and evaluated its feasibility and efficacy in a pilot, two arm, parallel group, randomized, open label trial in Aleppo, Syria. Fifty adults who smoked waterpipe ≥. 3 times per week in the last year, did not smoke cigarettes, and were interested in quitting were randomized to receive either brief (1 in-person session and 3 phone calls) or intensive (3 in-person sessions and 5 phone calls) behavioral cessation treatment delivered by a trained physician in a clinical setting. The primary efficacy end point of the developed interventions was prolonged abstinence at three months post-quit day, assessed by self-report and exhaled carbon monoxide levels of <. 10. ppm. Secondary end points were 7. day point-prevalent abstinence and adherence to treatment. Results: Thirty percent of participants were fully adherent to treatment, which did not vary by treatment group. The proportions of participants in the brief and intensive interventions with prolonged abstinence at the 3-month assessment were 30.4% and 44.4%, respectively. Previous success in quitting (OR = 3.57; 95% CI = 1.03-12.43) predicted cessation. Higher baseline readiness to quit, more confidence in quitting, and being unemployed predicted a better adherence to treatment (all p-values <. 0.05). Conclusions: Brief behavioral cessation treatment for waterpipe users appears to be feasible and effective. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Maziak W.,Florida International University | Maziak W.,Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies | Nakkash R.,American University of Beirut | Bahelah R.,Florida International University | And 4 more authors.
Health Policy and Planning | Year: 2013

The Arab world is comprised of 22 countries with a combined population of ∼360 million. The region is still at the initial stages of the tobacco epidemic, where it is expected to witness an increase in smoking levels and mounting tobacco-related morbidity and mortality in the future. Still, the bleak outlook of the tobacco epidemic in the Arab world continues to be faced with complacency in the form of underutilization of surveillance systems to monitor the tobacco epidemic and prioritize action, and failure to implement and enforce effective policies to curb the tobacco epidemic. Understandably, the focus on the Arab world carries the risk of trying to generalize to such a diverse group of countries at different level of economic and political development. Yet, tobacco control in the Arab world faces some shared patterns and common challenges that need to be addressed to advance its cause in this region. In addition, forces that promote tobacco use, such as the tobacco industry, and trends in tobacco use, such as the emerging waterpipe epidemic tend to coalesce around some shared cultural and socio-political features of this region. Generally, available data from Arab countries point at three major trends in the tobacco epidemic: (1) high prevalence of cigarette smoking among Arab men compared with women; (2) the re-emergence of waterpipe (also known as hookah, narghile, shisha, arghile) smoking as a major tobacco use method, especially among youth and (3) the failure of policy to provide an adequate response to the tobacco epidemic. In this review, we will discuss these trends, factors contributing to them, and the way forward for tobacco control in this unstable region. © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

Discover hidden collaborations