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Ng W.P.Q.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng W.P.Q.,Synergy Global | Lim M.T.,Petronas University of Technology | Bt Mohamad Izhar S.M.,Petronas University of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy | Year: 2014

This paper overviewed the potential of rubber seed biomass for its various applications and processing technologies. The rubber seed availability and supply are studied and focused on Southeast Asia region. Technologies with rubber seed and rubber seed oil processing are reviewed. Challenges over rubber seed utilisation, e.g. rubber seed biomass availability, labour issue, etc., are raised and discussed. Future developments of rubber seed utilisation, in term of its management trends and supply solutions, are proposed. Rubber seed is gaining attractions for its vast practical applications, as a result of the expansion of rubber industry. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Lam H.L.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng W.P.Q.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng F.Y.,Malaysian Palm Oil Council | Kamal M.,University of Technology Malaysia | Lim J.H.E.,Synergy Global
Chemical Engineering Transactions | Year: 2012

Malaysia, a tropical country with 4.98 million hectares of agricultural land covered by oil palm trees (MPOB, 2011), produces approximately 90 Mt/y of palm biomass (GGS, 2011). Over the years, the palm products have diversified from the conventional palm oil to various innovative goods such as dried fibres, bio-briquettes, pellets, plywood and so on. The previously waste which is indicated as 'carbon source', is being transformed into 'carbon sink'. A conceptual idea on the trend of palm biomass usage is illustrated in Figure 1. The paper overviewed the green potential of palm industry in the country. In Malaysia, palm oil industry has been recognised as one of the key industry in developing the country's sustainable development strategy. Malaysia is applying the 'Waste-to-Wealth' concept, which expands the country's economic and sustainable development simultaneously. Copyright © 2012, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Source


Ng W.P.Q.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Lam H.L.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng F.Y.,Malaysian Palm Oil Council | Kamal M.,University of Technology Malaysia | Lim J.H.E.,Synergy Global
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2012

This paper gives an overview of the green potential of the palm biomass industry, which contributes to Malaysia's economic and sustainable development. An overall picture of the green development indicators of the country is provided based on the authors' experiences in policy making, research and business development. The emerging palm biomass industry in Malaysia is foreseen to dominate the country's directional development in the coming years, particularly when the sustainability issue is raised globally. With the increasing volume of palm oil residue accumulation due to palm oil production, palm biomass is gaining significant attention and being increasingly utilised to produce various green products as well as highly valuable biochemicals, such as bioethanol, vitamins, etc. The palm oil industry has been identified as the key industry for expansion to achieve economic advancement along with the development of greener production processes in the country. Research on palm biomass, which is actively being carried out by both private and public institutions, is categorised. Furthermore, actions and policies to promote the implementation of green technology in Malaysia, while simultaneously defending both environmental and ecological health and promoting technology transformation, are summarised. Challenges and concerns over the green future of the country are discussed, as well as the business trend in the Malaysian palm biomass industry. Copyright © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Ng W.P.Q.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng W.P.Q.,Synergy Global | Promentilla M.A.,De La Salle University - Manila | Lam H.L.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2015

This paper presents a novel algebraic technique of supply network synthesis and analysis. A case study of biomass processing for supply network synthesis using three techniques (i) mathematical modelling (ii) supermatrix scoring concept and (iii) algebraic analysis with graphical visualisation is demonstrated. The results and performances of three techniques are compared. Comparable modelling results are obtained for all three approaches. The introduction of quantitative cum graphical analysis of supply network allows the performance overview of each possible choice of supply network in one picture. Besides, the algebraic method allows the concurrent set-up of material allocation and ranking of possible supply network choices. This outweighs the mathematical modelling technique that allows for optimal supply network synthesis but giving no insight to the performance of next network choices; and the supermatrix scoring technique that ranks the general supply network choices in a whole picture yet incapable to capture the optimal selection which involves only part of the players, especially in supply network problem. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Ng W.P.Q.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus | Ng W.P.Q.,Synergy Global | Lam H.L.,University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2014

This paper presents a functional clustering approach integrated in an industrial resources optimisation. Industrial processing hub formation through functional clustering of involved facilities is presented. A palm biomass case study is developed in this paper to illustrate the functional clustering model. Production facilities are identified and processing hub allocation is determined in the case study. Two models are developed: (i) biomass supply network optimisation and synthesis and (ii) biomass supply network with functional clustering. The former acts as a base case for optimal supply network synthesis. The following reforms the former by integrating a functional clustering concept. The second model functionally clusters the industrial facilities based on their material interactions. Each cluster formed consists of a centralised processing hub, which acts as the backbone/seed of a functional cluster. Strategic locations of centralised processing hubs are determined and functional clusters are formed by optimisation modelling. Optimised biomass supply networks are developed from the optimisation activities. The optimisation result favours centralised processing hub formation. Lowered machinery capital investment and transportation cost are achieved in the functional clustered model. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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