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Binotti B.,Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry | Pavlos N.J.,University of Western Australia | Riedel D.,Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry | Wenzel D.,Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry | And 10 more authors.
eLife | Year: 2014

Small GTPases of the Rab family not only regulate target recognition in membrane traffic but also control other cellular functions such as cytoskeletal transport and autophagy. Here we show that Rab26 is specifically associated with clusters of synaptic vesicles in neurites. Overexpression of active but not of GDP-preferring Rab26 enhances vesicle clustering, which is particularly conspicuous for the EGFP-tagged variant, resulting in a massive accumulation of synaptic vesicles in neuronal somata without altering the distribution of other organelles. Both endogenous and induced clusters co-localize with autophagy-related proteins such as Atg16L1, LC3B and Rab33B but not with other organelles. Furthermore, Atg16L1 appears to be a direct effector of Rab26 and binds Rab26 in its GTP-bound form, albeit only with low affinity. We propose that Rab26 selectively directs synaptic and secretory vesicles into preautophagosomal structures, suggesting the presence of a novel pathway for degradation of synaptic vesicles. © Maddox et al.


Hammer C.,Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine | Stepniak B.,Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine | Schneider A.,German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases | Papiol S.,Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine | And 20 more authors.
Molecular psychiatry | Year: 2014

In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function.


Hammer C.,Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine | Stepniak B.,Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine | Schneider A.,University of Gottingen | Schneider A.,Research Center Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain | And 26 more authors.
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2013

In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE-/-) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE-/- mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 3 September 2013; doi:10.1038/mp.2013.110.


Romanov R.A.,Karolinska Institutet | Alpar A.,Karolinska Institutet | Alpar A.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Zhang M.-D.,Karolinska Institutet | And 20 more authors.
EMBO Journal | Year: 2015

A hierarchical hormonal cascade along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis orchestrates bodily responses to stress. Although corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), produced by parvocellular neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and released into the portal circulation at the median eminence, is known to prime downstream hormone release, the molecular mechanism regulating phasic CRH release remains poorly understood. Here, we find a cohort of parvocellular cells interspersed with magnocellular PVN neurons expressing secretagogin. Single-cell transcriptome analysis combined with protein interactome profiling identifies secretagogin neurons as a distinct CRH-releasing neuron population reliant on secretagogin's Ca2+ sensor properties and protein interactions with the vesicular traffic and exocytosis release machineries to liberate this key hypothalamic releasing hormone. Pharmacological tools combined with RNA interference demonstrate that secretagogin's loss of function occludes adrenocorticotropic hormone release from the pituitary and lowers peripheral corticosterone levels in response to acute stress. Cumulatively, these data define a novel secretagogin neuronal locus and molecular axis underpinning stress responsiveness. Synopsis Bodily responses to acute stress are orchestrated by the hierarchical release of stress hormones along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-secreting neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus are first order neurons in this axis, priming subsequent hormonal cascades upon CRH release into the portal circulation at the median eminence. Secretagogin is identified as the first neuronal Ca2+ sensor localized to parvocellular systems. The transcriptome landscape of a novel hypothalamic neuron subtype, which contains secretagogin as Ca2+ sensor, is shown. Secretagogin's Ca2+-dependent protein interactome minimally required for regulated CRH release is defined. Secretagogin is recognized to rate-limit CRH release, thus limiting hormonal responses to stress. Bodily responses to acute stress are orchestrated by the hierarchical release of stress hormones along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-secreting neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus are first order neurons in this axis, priming subsequent hormonal cascades upon CRH release into the portal circulation at the median eminence. © 2014 The Authors.


Dean C.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Dean C.,European Neuroscience Institute | Dunning F.M.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Liu H.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | And 5 more authors.
Molecular Biology of the Cell | Year: 2012

The synaptotagmins (syts) are a family of molecules that regulate membrane fusion. There are 17 mammalian syt isoforms, most of which are expressed in the brain. However, little is known regarding the subcellular location and function of the majority of these syts in neurons, largely due to a lack of isoform-specific antibodies. Here we generated pHluorin-syt constructs harboring a luminal domain pH sensor, which reports localization, pH of organelles to which syts are targeted, and the kinetics and sites of exocytosis and endocytosis. Of interest, only syt-1 and 2 are targeted to synaptic vesicles, whereas other isoforms selectively recycle in dendrites (syt-3 and 11), axons (syt-5, 7, 10, and 17), or both axons and dendrites (syt-4, 6, 9, and 12), where they undergo exocytosis and endocytosis with distinctive kinetics. Hence most syt isoforms localize to distinct secretory organelles in both axons and dendrites and may regulate neuropeptide/neurotrophin release to modulate neuronal function. © 2012 Dean et al.

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