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News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: phys.org

Traditionally, FRAP data have been used to measure molecular diffusion—the passive drifting of molecules within the jelly-like cytoplasm inside a cell. But these molecular movements aren't always so passive. In many cellular processes, molecules can be transported actively by molecular motors, which tow molecules around like locomotives dragging lines of freight cars. "We know that active transport is important in many cellular systems, but there wasn't any way to capture it from FRAP data," said Veronica Ciocanel, a Ph.D. student in Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics. "We've developed a modeling technique for FRAP data that includes active transport and can quantify details about how those dynamics work." In a paper published in the Biophysical Journal, Ciocanel and her colleagues demonstrated the technique by describing new details about how egg cells redistribute genetic material before they begin dividing to form an embryo. Getting more from FRAP To perform a FRAP experiment, scientists tag molecules that they want to observe with glowing fluorescent proteins. Then they zap the area of interest with a laser, which deactivates some of the fluorescent proteins and creates a small dark spot within the glowing mass. Then scientists watch as the dark spot dissipates, which happens gradually as darkened molecules drift out of the spot and still-fluorescent molecules drift in. The amount of fluorescence in the spot as time progresses is what's known as a recovery curve. The recovery curve can then be fed into a mathematical model that generates a diffusion coefficient, an average rate at which the molecules drift around. Some models can also tease out a binding rate (the rate at which molecules stop moving by attaching themselves to some other molecule or substrate), but there weren't any that could deal with active transport. Ciocanel set out to create one in collaboration with a lab led by Kimberly Mowry, a professor of biology at Brown. One of the things Mowry's lab studies is RNA localization in egg cells, or oocytes. Before dividing to form embryos, oocytes redistribute messenger RNA—critical genetic molecules—from near the nucleus of the cell to the outer membrane on one of the cell's sides. The process occurs across animal species and is essential to normal embryo development. Mowry's lab studies it in a frog species called Xenopus laevis because the species' oocytes are relatively large and easier to observe. Mowry and other researchers had shown that active transport via molecular motors, along with diffusion, was likely important to the localization process in Xenopus oocytes. There was also speculation that the transport wasn't unidirectional from the nucleus out to the membrane. Mowry had performed experiments suggesting that mRNA molecules actually move back toward the nucleus at times during the process. But it was impossible to capture all of those dynamics via FRAP. Working with Björn Sandstede, chair of Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics, Ciocanel developed models using sets of partial differential equations that could capture active dynamics. One model captured two states of molecular movement: simple diffusion as well as active transport in a single direction. A second more complex model captures diffusion, two-directional movement as well as the possibility that some molecules remain stationary for periods of time. Ciocanel then developed a set of numerical techniques to solve the model and give velocities for active transport motion. Once the models were created and could be solved numerically, Ciocanel ran them on synthetic FRAP data from a hypothetical system in which the contributions from active transport were known. She showed that the models could correctly reproduce the active dynamics from the synthetic data. Having validated the models, the researchers applied them to real data from FRAP experiments on Xenopus and were able to shed new light on the RNA localization process. "We were able to quantify the contributions from each of the mechanisms," Ciocanel said. "We can predict how much of the mRNA is diffusing, moving up and down or pausing along the way." The models were also able to confirm small but important nuances in the dynamics. For example, the research showed that bi-directional transport occurred more prominently in the part of the cell closest to the membrane. New insights like these could ultimately help scientists to get a more complete picture of the dynamics at play in this critical cellular process. But this is far from the only setting where the technique could be helpful. Active transport is known to occur in many cellular processes. Synaptic activity in the brain, for example, is thought to involved active mRNA localization. "Whenever there's active transport," Sandstede said, "this method allows you to learn about what's happening." Explore further: Barriers and molecular trains trap Joubert syndrome protein in cilia


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Understanding how proteins and other molecules move around inside cells is important for understanding how cells function. Scientists use an experiment called Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching, or FRAP, to investigate this molecular motion, and now Brown University researchers have developed a mathematical modeling technique that makes FRAP much more useful. Traditionally, FRAP data have been used to measure molecular diffusion -- the passive drifting of molecules within the jelly-like cytoplasm inside a cell. But these molecular movements aren't always so passive. In many cellular processes, molecules can be transported actively by molecular motors, which tow molecules around like locomotives dragging lines of freight cars. "We know that active transport is important in many cellular systems, but there wasn't any way to capture it from FRAP data," said Veronica Ciocanel, a Ph.D. student in Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics. "We've developed a modeling technique for FRAP data that includes active transport and can quantify details about how those dynamics work." In a paper published in the Biophysical Journal, Ciocanel and her colleagues demonstrated the technique by describing new details about how egg cells redistribute genetic material before they begin dividing to form an embryo. Getting more from FRAP To perform a FRAP experiment, scientists tag molecules that they want to observe with glowing fluorescent proteins. Then they zap the area of interest with a laser, which deactivates some of the fluorescent proteins and creates a small dark spot within the glowing mass. Then scientists watch as the dark spot dissipates, which happens gradually as darkened molecules drift out of the spot and still-fluorescent molecules drift in. The amount of fluorescence in the spot as time progresses is what's known as a recovery curve. The recovery curve can then be fed into a mathematical model that generates a diffusion coefficient, an average rate at which the molecules drift around. Some models can also tease out a binding rate (the rate at which molecules stop moving by attaching themselves to some other molecule or substrate), but there weren't any that could deal with active transport. Ciocanel set out to create one in collaboration with a lab led by Kimberly Mowry, a professor of biology at Brown. One of the things Mowry's lab studies is RNA localization in egg cells, or oocytes. Before dividing to form embryos, oocytes redistribute messenger RNA -- critical genetic molecules -- from near the nucleus of the cell to the outer membrane on one of the cell's sides. The process occurs across animal species and is essential to normal embryo development. Mowry's lab studies it in a frog species called Xenopus laevis because the species' oocytes are relatively large and easier to observe. Mowry and other researchers had shown that active transport via molecular motors, along with diffusion, was likely important to the localization process in Xenopus oocytes. There was also speculation that the transport wasn't unidirectional from the nucleus out to the membrane. Mowry had performed experiments suggesting that mRNA molecules actually move back toward the nucleus at times during the process. But it was impossible to capture all of those dynamics via FRAP. Working with Björn Sandstede, chair of Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics, Ciocanel developed models using sets of partial differential equations that could capture active dynamics. One model captured two states of molecular movement: simple diffusion as well as active transport in a single direction. A second more complex model captures diffusion, two-directional movement as well as the possibility that some molecules remain stationary for periods of time. Ciocanel then developed a set of numerical techniques to solve the model and give velocities for active transport motion. Once the models were created and could be solved numerically, Ciocanel ran them on synthetic FRAP data from a hypothetical system in which the contributions from active transport were known. She showed that the models could correctly reproduce the active dynamics from the synthetic data. Having validated the models, the researchers applied them to real data from FRAP experiments on Xenopus and were able to shed new light on the RNA localization process. "We were able to quantify the contributions from each of the mechanisms," Ciocanel said. "We can predict how much of the mRNA is diffusing, moving up and down or pausing along the way." The models were also able to confirm small but important nuances in the dynamics. For example, the research showed that bi-directional transport occurred more prominently in the part of the cell closest to the membrane. New insights like these could ultimately help scientists to get a more complete picture of the dynamics at play in this critical cellular process. But this is far from the only setting where the technique could be helpful. Active transport is known to occur in many cellular processes. Synaptic activity in the brain, for example, is thought to involved active mRNA localization. "Whenever there's active transport," Sandstede said, "this method allows you to learn about what's happening." The research was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMS-1408742) and the National Institutes of Health (GM071049).


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Understanding how proteins and other molecules move around inside cells is important for understanding how cells function. Scientists use an experiment called Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching, or FRAP, to investigate this molecular motion, and now Brown University researchers have developed a mathematical modeling technique that makes FRAP much more useful. Traditionally, FRAP data have been used to measure molecular diffusion -- the passive drifting of molecules within the jelly-like cytoplasm inside a cell. But these molecular movements aren't always so passive. In many cellular processes, molecules can be transported actively by molecular motors, which tow molecules around like locomotives dragging lines of freight cars. "We know that active transport is important in many cellular systems, but there wasn't any way to capture it from FRAP data," said Veronica Ciocanel, a Ph.D. student in Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics. "We've developed a modeling technique for FRAP data that includes active transport and can quantify details about how those dynamics work." In a paper published in the Biophysical Journal, Ciocanel and her colleagues demonstrated the technique by describing new details about how egg cells redistribute genetic material before they begin dividing to form an embryo. Getting more from FRAP To perform a FRAP experiment, scientists tag molecules that they want to observe with glowing fluorescent proteins. Then they zap the area of interest with a laser, which deactivates some of the fluorescent proteins and creates a small dark spot within the glowing mass. Then scientists watch as the dark spot dissipates, which happens gradually as darkened molecules drift out of the spot and still-fluorescent molecules drift in. The amount of fluorescence in the spot as time progresses is what's known as a recovery curve. The recovery curve can then be fed into a mathematical model that generates a diffusion coefficient, an average rate at which the molecules drift around. Some models can also tease out a binding rate (the rate at which molecules stop moving by attaching themselves to some other molecule or substrate), but there weren't any that could deal with active transport. Ciocanel set out to create one in collaboration with a lab led by Kimberly Mowry, a professor of biology at Brown. One of the things Mowry's lab studies is RNA localization in egg cells, or oocytes. Before dividing to form embryos, oocytes redistribute messenger RNA -- critical genetic molecules -- from near the nucleus of the cell to the outer membrane on one of the cell's sides. The process occurs across animal species and is essential to normal embryo development. Mowry's lab studies it in a frog species called Xenopus laevis because the species' oocytes are relatively large and easier to observe. Mowry and other researchers had shown that active transport via molecular motors, along with diffusion, was likely important to the localization process in Xenopus oocytes. There was also speculation that the transport wasn't unidirectional from the nucleus out to the membrane. Mowry had performed experiments suggesting that mRNA molecules actually move back toward the nucleus at times during the process. But it was impossible to capture all of those dynamics via FRAP. Working with Björn Sandstede, chair of Brown's Division of Applied Mathematics, Ciocanel developed models using sets of partial differential equations that could capture active dynamics. One model captured two states of molecular movement: simple diffusion as well as active transport in a single direction. A second more complex model captures diffusion, two-directional movement as well as the possibility that some molecules remain stationary for periods of time. Ciocanel then developed a set of numerical techniques to solve the model and give velocities for active transport motion. Once the models were created and could be solved numerically, Ciocanel ran them on synthetic FRAP data from a hypothetical system in which the contributions from active transport were known. She showed that the models could correctly reproduce the active dynamics from the synthetic data. Having validated the models, the researchers applied them to real data from FRAP experiments on Xenopus and were able to shed new light on the RNA localization process. "We were able to quantify the contributions from each of the mechanisms," Ciocanel said. "We can predict how much of the mRNA is diffusing, moving up and down or pausing along the way." The models were also able to confirm small but important nuances in the dynamics. For example, the research showed that bi-directional transport occurred more prominently in the part of the cell closest to the membrane. New insights like these could ultimately help scientists to get a more complete picture of the dynamics at play in this critical cellular process. But this is far from the only setting where the technique could be helpful. Active transport is known to occur in many cellular processes. Synaptic activity in the brain, for example, is thought to involved active mRNA localization. "Whenever there's active transport," Sandstede said, "this method allows you to learn about what's happening."


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Linux. What is it? At one point in time it was a niche operating system run by those who wanted to show off their PC prowess and feel more alternative and l33t than the rest. But something happened on the way to the convention — Linux became accepted. Not only did this platform become accepted, it was adopted as a must-have technology by enterprise-level businesses, where reliability, flexibility, and security are key. But for the masses, those that have really only ever known either Windows or Mac, the question still remains. What is Linux? I want to answer that question for you. The answer will not be exhaustive (for that you'll need a book) and will target those that have had zero exposure to the operating system. I'm not going to pull it back so far as to answer the question, "What is an operating system?" I'm fairly confident the masses have that one down; so we'll focus on only this one particular operating system. And with that said, let me dive into the answer. If you ask the question, "What is Linux?" to a purist, they'll tell answer, "It's a modular kernel, created by Linus Torvalds." That's not an answer that helps us much, as the average user would then need to understand what a kernel is and why it's relevant to the issue at hand. Instead, I want to go by the broader definition of Linux, and say it's an operating system powered by the Linux kernel. To understand why Linux is so special, you have to first understand what open source is. Open source is software for which the original source code is made freely available to the public. With this source code you can modify and redistribute the software in any way you see fit (so long as you retain attribution to the original creator). In the modern vernacular, open source applies to much more than software. Nearly anything can be "open sourced" these days. The important factor in this is that the original designs, plans, schematics, etc. must be made available for the public to use. I can already hear your next question: But if anyone can view the source code, how do companies sell their software? You'll be surprised to hear that most open source software is given away for free. That's right, adopting open source software can mean you're entire software library can be had free of charge. And most of the open source software you can find is very high quality. Outside of the operating system, you'll find free software such as: That list goes on and on. Couple that with plenty of music and video players, even more browsers and email clients, just about every productivity tool you can think of, and you have the making for a computing platform that does everything your current operating system will do. But why bother? If it will only do what my current operating system will do, what would make me want to use Linux? Therein lies the crux of the issue. There are three ideals that Linux offers that are unmatched by any other platform: Let's talk about these ideals now. One of Linux's biggest selling points to enterprise businesses is its reliability. You can deploy a Linux server into a data center and know that it can be counted on, 24/7/365. That reliability translates from enterprise servers to the desktop. Unlike other desktop platforms, Linux won't automatically start an upgrade process that will span hours of time (preventing you from working all the while); nor will it bog down after months (or years) of usage. Of the 20 years I have used Linux as my only operating system, I can count on one hand the times where the platform has caused me issues that required either A) serious troubleshooting or B) an operating system reinstall. It's that reliable. For me, one of the most appealing aspects of Linux has always been its flexibility. If I don't like the way something looks or behaves, I can change it; not by re-coding the software, but by finding a different piece of software that does the same thing in a way that's agreeable to my needs. Say, for instance, I don't like the way the Ubuntu Linux desktop looks or behaves. I can install a completely different desktop (or use a different distribution altogether - more on that in a bit). Or say I don't like the way a piece of software functions. Most often the developers of software make it easy (by way of a configuration file) for users to change the behavior of their applications to a far greater degree than most proprietary software. Although no computer platform is 100% secure from malicious code and intent, Linux outshines all of its competition. When you're running a Linux desktop, you might be surprised to see there is no antivirus or anti-malware software running. Why? There is no need. Thanks to the fundamental security of the platform, it is not nearly as vulnerable as is the Windows platform. In all the years I have been using Linux, I have only experienced one such issue — a rootkit on a server. Once. That is not luck, that is Linux. This is where the confusion begins for many users. Yes, Linux is an operating system (based on the Linux kernel, yeah, yeah, yeah), but where do I get it? That depends on which distribution you want to use. That's right. There's isn't just one "official" Linux operating system. In fact, there are hundreds to choose from. There's: To find out just how many more distributions there are, visit Distrowatch. But what is a distribution? A Linux distribution is a variation on the Linux operating system that packages together different software (all running on the Linux kernel) that may meet different needs. Very often, the primary focus of each distribution is the desktop environment, of which there are plenty. This is getting confusing, right? Let me help you with that. The desktop environment is the pretty windows and menus you use to interact with the software you install. With Linux there are quite a few desktop environments (each of which offers a very different look, feel, and featureset). Some of the most popular desktop environments are: Another list that goes on and on. Some Linux desktops pride themselves on being very lightweight, so they run on older hardware very well (or make new hardware perform faster than you can imagine). Some Linux desktops are massive in their features and go a very long way to help the user be productive. You know the Apple Store? Linux had that first. Way back in 2001, Synaptic was (and still is) a graphical front end for the apt package manager. This tool enabled you to search through tens of thousands of software titles and install them with a few clicks. This idea was built upon by Ubuntu who released the Ubuntu Software Center in 2009 (the Ubuntu Software Center has been deprecated in favor of GNOME Software). Nearly every distribution makes use of such a tool; so when you need to find software, all you have to do is look through your desktop menu for the software center tool specific to your distribution, search for the software you want, and install. Speaking of installing, there are really two routes to installing software on Linux: Even though installing software from the command line is not terribly difficult, most users will want to work with the GUI front end. Why? Because installing software with that tool is little more than a few clicks away. Open up the Software Center (or whatever it is called on your distribution), search for the software you want to install, and click install. It's that easy. In fact, the Linux operating system has become so easy, you could spend your entire life using the platform and never have to touch the command line. Why even mention this? Years ago, this wasn't possible. When I first started using Linux, the command line was required, and it was often challenging, especially to a new user. Now, one uses the command line out of choice, not out of need. First off, if you're wary of installing an operating system on your own, know that the installation of Linux is as easy as installing a piece of software. In other words, if you've installed MS Office, you can install Linux. If, however, you still feel like this is too far above your pay grade, you can always purchase a computer with Linux pre-installed. Vendors that offer this include: It is also important to note that many Linux distributions also come in what is called a "live" variation. These live distributions can be burned onto a disk, inserted into your computer, and booted. You can then try out Linux without making any changes to your computer. If you like it, install it; if you don't like it, reboot your computer, remove the disk, and go back to your regular operating system. The reasons why you might want to use Linux may be as many and varied as are the choices of which distribution to use. Once you understand what Linux is all about (as well as the reasons so many now use Linux), the choice quickly becomes a no-brainer.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: news.europawire.eu

BRISTOL, 05-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Four University of Bristol academics have achieved the rare distinction of being elected Fellows of the world’s most eminent and oldest scientific academy in continuous existence, the Royal Society. Professor Sandu Popescu from the School of Physics, Professor Andrew Orr-Ewing from the School of Chemistry, Professor Tim Elliott from the School of Earth Sciences and Professor Stafford Lightman from the Centre for Synaptic Plasticity have been awarded the prestigious accolade for their outstanding contributions to science. In total 50 distinguished scientists were elected as Fellows of the Royal Society and 10 as new Foreign Members. The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering, and medicine. The Society’s fundamental purpose, reflected in its founding Charters of the 1660s, is to recognise, promote, and support excellence in science and to encourage the development and use of science for the benefit of humanity. University of Bristol Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Hugh Brady, said: “We are delighted to celebrate the election of four new Fellows to the Royal Society. “This a well-deserved honour for four of Bristol’s most successful researchers who are not only at the cutting edge of discovery in their academic disciplines but also wonderful contributors to Bristol’s inspiring and stretching research-rich learning environment.” Professor Tim Gallagher, Dean of Science at the University of Bristol, said: “This is terrific news and reflects, first and foremost, on the achievements of these people as individuals and as scientists. “It also reflects on the environment we offer here in Bristol that allows great people to realise their potential.” Venki Ramakrishnan, President of the Royal Society, added: “Science is a great triumph of human achievement and has contributed hugely to the prosperity and health of our world. “In the coming decades it will play an increasingly crucial role in tackling the great challenges of our time including food, energy, health and the environment. “The new Fellows of the Royal Society have already contributed much to science and it gives me great pleasure to welcome them into our ranks.”


Global Fingerprint Sensors Market, by Component (Hardware, Sensor (Ultrasound, Optical, Thermal, Solid-state), Software), by Application (Defense, Government, Military, Commercial, Banking, Mobile security) - Forecast 2027Pune, India - April 25, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ — Global Fingerprint Sensors Market – Market Synopsis and Market Scenario Fingerprint Sensors Global Market growth is majorly driven by the growing demand for security checks in organizations, growing importance of physical access control solution, and growing market of smartphones and tablets among others. Hence the market for Fingerprint Sensors is expected to grow at a significant rate of CAGR during the forecast period - 2016-2027. However, lack of technical awareness and technology restrictions are some of the major factors which are hindering the growth of Fingerprint Sensors Market. Technological improvements have increased the strength of area sensors but manufacturing challenges have restrained their mass manufacturing and, as a result, the market price of an area sensor is as much as three times of the market price of a swipe sensor. There are several important trends that have been driving the technological innovations in the industry since its early days, and which, directly or indirectly, are driving the fingerprint sensors market, currently. The major trend that is driving the market is the size reduction of the fingerprint sensors, which enables their integration into mobile phone devices without sacrificing other functionalities Fingerprint Sensors Market – Industry News: • Fingerprint cards have launched its new product touch fingerprint sensor devices to serve entry-level smartphone market on June 2016. • Synaptic has announced in year 2015 about expansion of its product “Natural ID” with small area fingerprint sensors to support high end mobile devices. This Synaptic Natural ID provides fingerprint ID with a single touch which makes it different from traditional sensors. Key Players • 3M Cogent Inc. (U.S.) • Crossmatch (U.S.) • Dermalog Identification Systems (Germany) • Egis Technology Inc.(U.S.) • Fingerprint Cards AB (Sweden) • Goodix Ltd (China) • NEC Corporation (Japan) • Silead Inc. (China) • Suprema Inc. (Korea) • Synaptic Inc. (U.S.) Request a Sample Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1046 Global Fingerprint Sensors Market – Report Segments Global Fingerprint Sensors Market is segmented in to two key dynamics for better understanding of the market: Segmentation by Components: sensors (optical sensors, capacitive sensors, ultrasound sensors, thermal sensors and solid-state sensors among others), hardware and software among others. Segmentation by Application: mobile security, government, military & defense, banking, and commercial among others. Global Fingerprint Sensors Market - Overview: Fingerprint sensors are used to provide authentication and authorization to the individual by capturing extract of their finger prints biological features in the form of the live scan. Fingerprint sensors also compare it with existing biometric template stored in the database. Using biometrics for authentication purpose provides greater convenience and reliability. Fingerprint sensor is a major biometric technology in consumer electronics, equipped with secured authentication system. Nowadays, smartphones, tablets, and PDAs are becoming the most indispensable gadget of our everyday lives. Finger print sensors are widely used in the commercial securities as a preferred biometric authentication system. Fingerprints provide reliable, fast and easy access to personal contact details, payment information, mails, location data and other form of encrypted data to authenticated person. Fingerprint sensors are now increasingly used in consumer electronics like smartphones, tablets and laptops and are expected to drive future market, states the Scholar in this exclusive Market Study Report - “Global Fingerprint Sensors Market” presented by Market Research Future. The report takes you through the full Market Analysis, Opportunities, Price, Growth, Trends and Featuring the market Predictions right up to the years 2021 and helps you to find out: • How the market revenue is progressing globally. • What are the key driving or affecting factors for the market growth? • How the market revenue is progressing in various segments & geographies. • Who are the emerging Players, current players & the Key Players (Leaders) of the market? Get yourself acquainted with their trends. • What are the current main market trends responsible for shaping up the Market Acquisitions Browse Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/fingerprint-sensors-market Fingerprint Sensors Market – Regional Analysis Asia-Pacific is expected to dominate the Global Fingerprint Sensors Market with the largest market share due to growing usage of biometric devices in organizations, and growing acceptance of new technology in the region, and therefore accounting for a larger market share and is expected to grow over substantially in terms of economy. Fingerprint Sensors Market in Europe is expected to grow not only with a considerable rate of CAGR but also in terms of Finance from by 2027. Fingerprint Sensors Market in North America is expected to grow at a substantial rate of CAGR during the forecast period 2016-2027. Global Fingerprint Sensors Market – Utility Aspects of the Report • The report provides detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 10 years of the various segments and sub-segments of the Global Fingerprint Sensors market. • Offers insights about factors affecting the market growth. • Enables to Analyze the Fingerprint Sensors Market based on various factors- price analysis, supply chain analysis, porters five force analysis etc. • Provides historical and forecast revenue of the market segments and sub-segments with respect to four main geographies and their countries- North America, Europe, Asia, and Rest of the World (ROW). • Offers country level analysis of the market with respect to the current market size and future prospective • Provides country level analysis of the market for segment by components, by applications and sub-segments. • Offers strategic profiling of key players in the market, comprehensively analyzing their core competencies, and drawing a competitive landscape for the market • Enables to track and analyze competitive developments such as joint ventures, strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, new product developments, and research and developments in the Global Fingerprint Sensors market Related Report Global Mobile Application Development Market, by Platform (IOS, Android), by Application (E-commerce, Banking, Entertainment (Gaming, Media), Education, Government Agencies, Airline Industry) - Forecast 2022 https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/mobile-app-development-market About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. Contact Info:Name: Akash AnandEmail: akash.anand@marketresearchfuture.comOrganization: Market Research FutureAddress: Office No. 528, Amanora Chambers Magarpatta Road, HadapsarPhone: +1 646 845 9312Source URL: http://marketersmedia.com/global-fingerprint-sensors-market-expected-to-grow-significantly-an-exclusive-forecast-by-the-expert-of-market-research-future/189922For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/fingerprint-sensors-marketSource: MarketersMediaRelease ID: 189922


The iPhone 8’s signature design feature will be a bezeless display extending from edge to edge. That means there’s no room for a physical home button on the device, so Apple has to “kill” it. However, more reports indicate the iPhone maker may not be able to do so this year. Don't Miss: These are the Netflix originals generating the most buzz online Technically, Apple already killed the physical home button with the iPhone 7 series. These devices do not have a home button that you can actually press. Furthermore, the iPhone 6s introduced the 3D Touch screen that theoretically allows Apple to relegate several home button functions to any region of the display. There’s one critical feature of the home button that needs to be preserved as well, the Touch ID fingerprint sensor required for unlocking the phone, signing into apps and services, and using Apple Pay. Touch ID isn’t something Apple can easily ditch, even if there are rumors that 3D facial recognition cameras will replace the fingerprint sensor. Apple wants to place the fingerprint sensor under the display, but that technology doesn’t appear to be ready yet. According to a Sunday research note from Pacific Crest Securities, Apple has issues with the new sensor, which could either delay the iPhone 8’s launch or force Apple to place it on the back of the handset. “The anticipated move to a full-screen OLED panel in the coming iPhone 8/X eliminates the physical home button, which necessitates a move to a virtual home button and an optical fingerprint sensing solution to read fingerprints through the OLED panel,” the research note reads, according to Investors . “At this point, we do not believe Apple’s optical fingerprint module provider has firm orders for production, which suggests Apple does not have functionality of the optical fingerprint sensor ready. Additionally, we believe Apple has evaluated Synaptic’s optical fingerprint solution, but that it has not been qualified.” Synaptics has been working on a similar fingerprint solution for Samsung’s Galaxy S8 but failed to deliver it on time for the phone’s launch. “Likely options for Apple include a delay of production or elimination of fingerprint sensing on the OLED iPhone,” the report also says, according to MacRumors. “We believe Apple continues to work on solving its optical fingerprint issues. If it’s able to solve the problems in the next month or so, it would likely place volume orders at that point. This would likely lead to a delay of the OLED iPhone launch, but we would not expect it to meaningfully affect volume for the cycle. If it’s not able to fix the problems in that time frame, Apple may be forced to eliminate fingerprint sensing from the OLED iPhone altogether. Similar reports from other analysts offered the same type of warnings, suggesting that Apple might be forced to delay the iPhone 8’s in-store launch this year to deal with Touch ID-related supply issues. See the original version of this article on BGR.com


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Broadcast PR Services Company Flexes its Social and Digital Muscle with New SMT Integrations NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - May 15, 2017) - Synaptic Digital is taking a fresh approach to SMTs. In addition to one day of media interviews, the PR services company using the SMT production day as a platform to capture content for multiple, longer, social media campaigns. According to a new survey from Pew Research Center Nearly two-thirds of American adults - 62%- get news from a social media site. "With all the ways people are getting their news and sharing content, there is a true opportunity to better leverage the time you have with a spokesperson at your tour to develop additional media campaigns that will live across multiple channels," says Jason Rockman, Managing Director at Synaptic Digital (a Definition 6 company). In today's 24-hour news cycle it's important to have your message appear frequently and to the right audiences. Investing time during your SMT to capture content that can be reimagined into Facebook videos, Pinterest posts, Instagram stories, YouTube Serialized Shorts and Twitter tips, allows you to extend your SMT message and deliver it to new audiences. The more digital channels that tell your story, the more data can be captured to show direct attribution back to organizational KPIs. "As a company that sends out more than 3,000 pieces of social content a month, we understand how to create the most relevant content for each social channel and audience. A video that works for TV is not the same as one that will resonate on Facebook or Instagram. Synaptic Digital delivers on the complexities and nuances of creating social content that is engaging to the viewer while extending your brands authentic voice." says Jason Rockman, Managing Director at Synaptic Digital (a Definition 6 company). Dan Schwartzberg, SVP of product development explains how it works: "We first discuss the target audience and existing social strategy with the client's PR team. From there, we suggest a blend of social and digital channels and strategies. At the SMT, we capture the elements necessary to create the assets." Through tagging, Synaptic Digital is able to quantify the performance of the content and track the customer journey. "Our proven approach to digital strategy, will help you demonstrate cost efficiencies, and true performance of your SMT campaigns" concludes Rockman. For over 25 years, Synaptic Digital has excelled at media relations, media distribution, and all forms of broadcast and digital communications. As part of Definition 6, we are a unique force of cross-disciplined talents pioneering new forms of strategy and storytelling in the form of digital, broadcast, experiential, social, entertainment and technology solutions. Throughout company history, Definition 6 has created over $15 billion in revenue for its customers, including The Coca-Cola Company, HBO, Siemens, La Quinta Inns & Suites, GM and Nickelodeon.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Philadelphia, PA, May 25, 2017 - The human brain functions on a delicate balance of reinforcing positive behaviors and suppressing negative ones, which takes place in the dorsal striatum, a brain region critical for goal-directed behavior and implicated in drug and alcohol addiction. According to a new study in Biological Psychiatry, two pathways in the dorsal striatum that regulate this process -- the "Go" pathway, which hits the gas for rewarding behaviors, and the "No-Go" pathway, which hits the brakes -- have opposite effects to control alcohol drinking behavior. Led by Dr. Jun Wang of Texas A&M Health Science Center, the study reports that alcohol-induced alterations in the signaling of these two pathways reinforce alcohol consumption, possibly leading to alcohol abuse or addiction. Co-first authors Dr. Yifeng Cheng, Dr. Cathy Huang, and Dr. Tengfei Ma and colleagues trained mice to become heavy drinkers by repeated cycles of consumption and withdrawal of 20% alcohol -- slightly higher than the average alcohol content in a glass of wine -- and measured the effects on the balance of this delicate control of reward behavior. "To the best of our knowledge, this article demonstrated, for the first time, that excessive alcohol consumption suppresses activity of the No-Go pathway," said Wang. By recording the activity of cells, the researchers found substantially increased GABA signaling, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter of the brain, which quieted the No-Go pathway. Excessive alcohol consumption had the opposite effect in the Go pathway. These cells had increased glutamate signaling, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, ramping up the Go signal. The findings reveal detailed information on the mechanisms underlying control of alcohol consumption. "Both of these effects serve to reinforce alcohol consumption, leading to pathological excessive use of alcohol," wrote the authors. Through manipulation of cells specific to each pathway to mimic either increased glutamatergic or GABAergic activity, Cheng and colleagues confirmed that inhibition of cells in the No-Go pathway and excitation of cells in the Go pathway promotes alcohol consumption. The findings indicate that either of these alterations is sufficient to drive alcohol drinking behavior. The researchers dug deeper into the mechanism and found that activation of dopamine D2 receptors, the type that mediate the No-Go pathway, also reduced GABAergic activity and alcohol consumption. The regulation in GABAergic activity was mediated by a downstream target of D2 receptors called GSK3β, which altered the expression of GABA receptors in the cells. "These findings identified potential therapeutic targets," said Wang, referring to GSK3β and GABA signaling in the No-Go pathway, which the researchers hope will aid development of new ways to treat alcohol abuse. The study may have even broader implications, according to Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. "The balance between signaling in the [Go] and [No-Go] pathways is likely to be a critical factor influencing motivated behavior, generally. This balance might be targeted to treat alcoholism, but also other addictions, mood disorders, and perhaps OCD," he said. The article is "Distinct Synaptic Strengthening of the Striatal Direct and Indirect Pathways Drives Alcohol Consumption," by Yifeng Cheng, Cathy C.Y. Huang, Tengfei Ma, Xiaoyan Wei, Xuehua Wang, Jiayi Lu, and Jun Wang (http://dx. ). It appears in Biological Psychiatry, volume 81, issue 11 (June 2017), published by Elsevier. Copies of this paper are available to credentialed journalists upon request; please contact Rhiannon Bugno at Biol.Psych@UTSouthwestern.edu or +1 214 648 0880. Journalists wishing to interview the authors may contact Jun Wang, M.D., Ph.D., at jwang@medicine.tamhsc.edu. The authors' affiliations and disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available in the article. John H. Krystal, M.D., is Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine, Chief of Psychiatry at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and a research psychiatrist at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. His disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available here. Biological Psychiatry is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, whose purpose is to promote excellence in scientific research and education in fields that investigate the nature, causes, mechanisms and treatments of disorders of thought, emotion, or behavior. In accord with this mission, this peer-reviewed, rapid-publication, international journal publishes both basic and clinical contributions from all disciplines and research areas relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major psychiatric disorders. The journal publishes novel results of original research which represent an important new lead or significant impact on the field, particularly those addressing genetic and environmental risk factors, neural circuitry and neurochemistry, and important new therapeutic approaches. Reviews and commentaries that focus on topics of current research and interest are also encouraged. Biological Psychiatry is one of the most selective and highly cited journals in the field of psychiatric neuroscience. It is ranked 5th out of 140 Psychiatry titles and 11th out of 256 Neurosciences titles in the Journal Citations Reports® published by Thomson Reuters. The 2015 Impact Factor score for Biological Psychiatry is 11.212. Elsevier is a global information analytics company that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 35,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray's Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a global provider of information and analytics for professionals and business customers across industries. http://www.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Desktop Linux. It's a bacon-wrapped conundrum with a donut-flavored bun. You know the separate pieces are delicious, but you're not quite sure how they would taste together. Many distributions are working hard to come up with the exact combination of flavors to entice computer users around the world to come try their goods. Some, such as Ubuntu, are starting to see success. Others, such as Bodhi Linux, are so close to creating the right combination that  you can smell the goodness wafting through the air. I've covered this particular Linux distribution a number of times. For a long while, it was my favorite flavor of Linux. Eventually, once audio recording became a must-have, I had to sadly leave Bodhi behind. During my absence, both Bodhi and Enlightenment, the window manager (Figure A), have matured quite a bit. Both are incredibly stable and lightning fast (the speed of Bodhi on a solid state drive is almost mind blowing). But even with its incredible growth, Bodhi is still relegated to the fringes of desktop usage. This solution is two-fold. The first is primarily regarding Enlightenment. When you complete the installation of Bodhi and log into the desktop, you're presented with simple wizard to set up Enlightenment. This needs to go away. Yes, it's awesome that Enlightenment can be configured more than probably any other desktop interface. I was weened on such window managers, but for users not accustomed to such configurations, this can be an issue. And since everything about Enlightenment is drastically different than any other window manager ever used by the average person, much of this is gong to be confusing at best. With that in mind, it would be smart of Bodhi to eliminate this step in the process. Instead, it needs to have a default configuration, one that both shows off the incredible power and flexibility of Enlightenment, yet makes the whole of the environment easy for new users. It will be necessary to leave all of the configuration options available, so that familiar users can tweak their desktops to their hearts content. The second solution might cut to the heart of the essence of Bodhi. This particular distribution prides itself on being a minimalist flavor of Linux. That's all fine and good, because it allows users to really pick and choose what applications to install. The problem is that new users are going to take one look at Synaptic and turn away. Don't get me wrong, I've used Synaptic for years and have always found it to be an outstanding tool. But let's take a look at a simple scenario... One of the first things a user will want to install is an office suite. To do this, they fire up Synaptic and click on the "office" category. This is where things get a bit confusing. Quite a number of libraries reside within the office category, to the point where it could easily become a chore just to get LibreOffice installed. Instead of this, I believe a new package manager needs to be developed — one that's in line with the likes of the Ubuntu Software Center or any given smartphone app store. It needs to be painfully obvious how to get applications installed, and even groups of packages. For example, there could be a productivity package that includes apps such as: There could also be a multi-media package that includes the following apps: These packages would need to be a single click away from installation. Yes, it would mean a lot of development on the part of the Bodhi developers, but I strongly believe in making the Linux desktop as user-friendly as possible — even for those distributions that pride themselves on being a tinkerer's dream. A new, end-user-friendly package manager would go a long way to help getting a distribution worthy of success into the hands of the masses. Don't get me wrong — as it is, Bodhi Linux is an outstanding distribution for users who really want to get their hands dirty with Linux. It could, however, with just a bit of work, easily become one of the best looking distributions available and one of the most popular distributions on the market. Of course, to do that, they need help. One way to help is through a donation drive. The developers of Bodhi are raffling off a Chromebook with Bodhi Linux pre-installed. For a chance to win this special Chromebook, hop on over to the Bodhi donation page. For every $5.00 you donate, your name will go into the raffle for a Bodhi-powered, Samsung Chromebook with the following specs: It's a sweet little machine and a great cause. Your donation will help one of the more unique flavors of Linux continue to grow. Hopefully, the developers will consider my advice and look to expand their reach. With just a couple of changes, Bodhi could quickly rise in the ranks of popularity for desktop (and mobile) computing. What are your thoughts about Bodhi Linux? What changes and/or improvements would you make to this distribution? Share your opinion in the discussion thread below.

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