San Jose, CA, United States
San Jose, CA, United States

Microsemi Corporation is a manufacturer of defense, security, aerospace, enterprise, communications, medical, alternative energy, and industrial products for power-related applications. Major products offered by Microsemi are analog devices, mixed-signal and RF integrated circuits, customizable system-on-chips , FPGAs, and complete subsystems. It has been based in Aliso Viejo, California since 2011, when it relocated its headquarters from Irvine, California. Microsemi has plants in California, Arizona, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida, Ireland, China and Canada. Wikipedia.

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News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Former Leader of Sales At Bitsight Technologies, IBM and Q1 Labs ELIZABETHTOWN, KY--(Marketwired - Dec 13, 2016) - Venminder, a leading vendor management software and services provider serving banks, credit unions and mortgage companies, today announced that Todd Laughman has joined the firm as the Senior Vice President of Sales. In this role, Todd will oversee all sales operations and management, leading the expansion of Venminder's sales team nationwide. "I am excited to welcome Todd to the Venminder family," said Dana Bowers, CEO and Founder of Venminder. "Venminder has been experiencing explosive growth this year, doubling in size from the increasing demand for innovative vendor risk software and services by financial institutions as they seek out solutions to help meet the regulatory guidance. As a proven leader and industry veteran, Todd will help us build on our forward momentum and he will play a key role in executing on our growth strategy. Todd's client-first approach also aligns with our overall goal of driving value for our clients." Mr. Laughman brings a broad range of experience to his new position at Venminder. Most notably, Todd led the world-wide sales team at cybersecurity monitoring firm, Bitsight Technologies, to its first $30 million in revenue during two successive rounds of funding at increasing valuation. Todd has also held successful sales management positions at IBM, Q1 Labs, Rivulet and Symmetricom, and is a retired Air Force Colonel serving at multiple group commands in Logistics and Aerial Port Operations. "I'm thrilled to be joining Venminder and especially excited to take part in this next stage of expansion," said Todd Laughman, Senior Vice President of Sales. "Already serving hundreds of customers, Venminder has a significant opportunity to truly help financial institutions overcome the many challenges faced today in vendor risk. The firm's industry-leading technology and subject matter experts puts us in a strong position to get to that next level and fast. The company's impressive growth is proof that they have exactly what the industry needs." Venminder has seen tremendous growth having doubled in size in 2016. The new addition to the management team follows Venminder completing a $4 million Series B financing round led by Bain Capital Ventures earlier in the year. The firm plans to continue development of its robust vendor management software platform as well as to expand their team to support increased demand for outsourced vendor management support. About Venminder Venminder has a team of due diligence experts who can significantly reduce your vendor management workload. The firm addresses the tactical challenges of vendor management tasks such as collecting compliance documentation, analyzing a vendor's financial health, deploying paralegals to assist with vendor contracts, reviewing a vendor's SSAE 16, monitoring a vendor's cybersecurity posture and much more. While financial institutions cannot outsource ownership of vendor risk, they can outsource the tactical work of assessing the risk. Venminder also has a software solution to organize, track and report findings to Senior Management, the Board of Directors and, ultimately, the examining bodies. It is a "must have" answer to meeting increasing regulatory requirements. The SaaS based software solution guides a user through critical processes such as risk assessments, due diligence requirements and task management. Visit www.venminder.com for more information.


Cosart L.,Symmetricom
IEEE International Symposium on Precision Clock Synchronization for Measurement, Control, and Communication, ISPCS | Year: 2011

The IEEE 1588 packet probe has proved to be an effective tool for the measurement and analysis of network packet delay variation and latency. As more and more IEEE 1588 equipment is designed and deployed in the service of telecommunications networks and for other applications, in some cases with on-path support provided by boundary or transparent clocks, it has become important to be able to characterize this equipment. In many cases the packets themselves are the only timing signal available for study. Thus the packet probe is an essential tool for characterizing this equipment. Likewise, the same metrics developed for the analysis of network packet delay variation can be employed for equipment characterization. This paper, drawing on measurements of commercial equipment, describes how a packet probe along with traditional stability metrics and recently developed packet metrics can be used to characterize IEEE 1588 grandmaster clocks, boundary clocks, and transparent clocks. © 2011 IEEE.


Stein S.,Symmetricom
IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control | Year: 2010

The Allan variance has historically been estimated using heterodyne measurement systems, which have low noise and preserve the carrier phase information needed for long-term stability. The single-sideband phase noise has traditionally been estimated using phase detectors that suppress the carrier to achieve even lower noise. The recent development of the direct-digital phase noise measurement technique makes it possible to estimate both statistics accurately and simultaneously from the same time series of the phase. Our comparison of the 3 techniques has revealed several challenges to the accurate estimation of the Allan variance including undesired aliasing, biased estimators, and spurious signal generation. Investigation of these difficulties has led to several opportunities to improve Allan variance estimation, including the ability to estimate the instrumentation noise floor during a measurement and the existence of an optimum measurement bandwidth. In the end, this has led to faster, easier, more reliable, and more accurate measurement methods. © 2006 IEEE.


Cosart L.,Symmetricom
IEEE Communications Magazine | Year: 2011

As the transport of data across the network relies increasingly on Ethernet/IP methods and less on the TDM infrastructure, the need for packet methods of synchronization transport arises. Evaluation of these new packet methods of frequency and time transport requires new approaches to timing measurement and analysis. This article describes these new packet measurement techniques and introduces some of the new metrics being used for packet timing data analysis. © 2006 IEEE.


A clock at a first network element that is connected to a second network element over an optical fiber link is aligned in time/phase using packet protocols such as PTP. The invention discloses how to correct the asymmetry error inherent in traditional packet-based time-transfer methods.


Patent
Symmetricom | Date: 2011-03-16

A packet probe for a packet network accurately generates and monitors packets within the network. The packet probe supports packet generation and packet transmission. When a packet is ready for transmission, a hardware-based time stamp unit affixes a time stamp to the packet reflecting an actual transmission time. The packet probe also supports receiving, filtering, and time stamping received packets. When a packet is received, a packet filter determines whether the received packet should be stored in memory along with a time stamp reflecting an actual reception time.


Patent
Symmetricom | Date: 2011-12-01

A clock at a first network element that is connected to a second network element over first and second optical links that are physically distinct from each other is aligned using optical timing signals having different wavelengths. Transit delays between the first and second network elements may be determined using the same optical timing signals.


News Article | May 2, 2013
Site: www.cnet.com

"Oh, your watch is beautiful! Is it...?" "Atomic," you'll be able to say very soon, if you have a huge amount of money and don't mind wearing radioactive matter about your well-tailored person. Hoptroff, the London-based makers of the intricate insides of personal timepieces, have teamed up with time techies Symmetricom to make what they call the No 10, "the world's first atomic-powered pocket watch". Hoptroff says it's the most accurate movement ever, losing one and a half seconds every thousand years -- that's 240,000 times more accurate than Big Ben. Not to be confused with your common or garden watch that might achieve that kind of millenial accuracy by simply receiving a radio signal from a central atomic clock -- like this Hammacher Schlemmer effort -- the No 10 has all the gubbins it needs to do the job itself. Indeed, Symmetricon developed the chip-scale atomic clock system for the US military, which needed self-reliant super-accurate timepieces in case of signal jamming. And because of the scary stuff inside it, you'll be subject to security clearances before you can buy one. The movement contains a tiny caesium gas chamber inside a temperature-controlled oven, with a laser to activate the radioactive atoms and a microwave resonator to measure their atomic transitions -- their half-life -- in order to measure time. "As far as we know it is the first time an atomic time source has been used in a pocket watch movement," boasts Richard Hoptroff, managing director of Hoptroff, "and it delights me that it was achieved right here in London, not Le Locle or Tokyo." The movement has a staggering 28 dials, measuring useful things to know such as your longitude, latitude and humidity, and whether the mini nuclear reactor is about to tear a hole in your abdomen. The finished pocket watch is due later this year, and will cost "well into five figures". Only 12 will be made. Here's a concept design of what it might look like: Would you carry one of these around in your Ede & Ravenscroft waistcoat? Deign to leave a comment below, or mix with the hoi polloi on our Facebook page.


News Article | December 20, 2012
Site: venturevillage.eu

Quantum tech is “not really that space-age” – Russia’s Serguei Beloussov explains his new multi-million dollar venture The quest for world-changing projects takes venture capitalists to some strange and exciting places – personal robotics, commercial space flight… and now, quantum technology. Will it fly? Quantum Wave Fund is a new VC firm dedicated to quantum technology. That’s the industry that uses – or hopes to use – research at atomic and subatomic level to create new, practical devices and processes. The firm, headquartered in Boston, has so far managed to raise $40million for its first fund. It hopes to close it at $100m. There are some solid links here, including to Harvard University. Yet the firm’s catchphrase – “riding the wave of quantum technology revolution” – seems premature. Quantum technology is not widespread. The internet is littered with dodgy-sounding products. The science is complex, and the holy grail – commercial, industrial-scale quantum computing – is still out of reach. One of the business brains behind Quantum Wave Fund is Serguei Beloussov (above), the founder of software companies Parallels and Acronis and a senior partner at Moscow- and Berlin-based VC Runa Capital. Here, he justifies his latest venture: I graduated from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, which was a top school in the Soviet Union for physics and technology… Two of my classmates are now professors at Harvard – Eugene Demler and Mikhail Lukin. I kept contact with these guys over the years… I got involved in business after graduating but I stayed interested in physics. About three years ago, I got involved in the creation of the Russian Quantum Centre. After that, I also got involved with the Singapore Quantum Centre… While establishing the Russian Quantum Centre, I went and looked at a number of tech centres for quantum information processing, all over the world. In Europe, in Asia, in the US, in Canada. I realised that this is a very, very interesting field. We’ve actually been working on Quantum Wave Fund for almost a year already. Now it has an office, there is a formal deal. We’ve already done several investments. In general, there are three areas of quantum technologies. Area number one is quantum computing… There are not many commercial companies in this field. There’s only one company shipping something, which is D-Wave and there’s a lot of controversy about what they ship. It’s a Canadian company. The next area, which already has a number of technologies shipping, is quantum security, cryptography and communications. There are already a lot of companies here, like MagiQ; companies like NAC and Toshiba… So that’s more a near-term area. The last area is quantum sensors. In the past 20 years, physicists have learned how to manipulate matter at the scale of a single atom or single photon. That’s a very powerful metric. Magnetic fields, electric fields, gravitational fields, acceleration, time, distance – all can be measured precisely with the help of quantum effects. So, that’s an area where we’ll also be doing a lot of investments, and where we see a lot of practical applications today. There are small-scale atomic clocks, for example; there is a company in the US called Symmetricom. No, but we’re talking about the low hundreds of millions of dollars. It’s quite small but quantum tech is what underlies the physical reality of the world. It’s the smallest scale effect known to mankind today. So, it’s capable of making the smallest and most importantly the fastest devices… It’s going to be a huge industry. Quantum theory is almost 100 years old. The difference, which really happened in the last 20 years and mostly in the last 10 years, is physicists have learned how to manipulate matter on the scale of single quantum mechanics. The articles about this are quite new; some of the most famous articles are 10, 15 years old. The Nobel Prize this year was awarded to Serge Haroche – he’s a physicist – for research he did about 10 years ago, maybe 15 years ago… So, it’s not a buzzword. It’s exactly what we’re trying to accomplish. We’re trying to bet on devices that will do computation, communication or measurement based on single quantum effects. We naturally believe this is possible, knowing what’s happening in physics and knowing what’s happening in the industry. We’re sure that when – and if – it’s possible at industrial scale, it’ll be the best way to do things. One thing, which is quite important. We only invest in companies that already ship devices. [And] in order to do due diligence, you will have to involve a professor at Harvard in experimental physics – to understand the science behind the devices, to understand the market, the applications where they can be used and so on. First, we already have close to $40m in the fund. Second, $100m is not that much money in this field. If you look at what funds in internet are raising, it’s billions of dollars globally. So $100m is really tiny and we’ve already raised 40 per cent of it. Third, we’re not betting on institutional investors. We would welcome them but we believe this is a long-term plan, that the world will change… This is the first fund and we’re inviting whoever will join to this fund, whether institutional or private investors. At the very least, they can look at what we do now and invest in a fund II or a fund III. Fourth answer: while it looks space-age, it’s not really that space-age. Investors that know the field can kind of grasp, after some explanation, that the field is valid. There are very few teams that invest in this field that are capable of doing due diligence, capable of helping the companies… If anybody wants to invest in quantum tech, we’re the best place to go. We think we will have no trouble raising a fund of $100m. Talkbits previews new walkie talkie app, confirms $2m from Russia’s Runa Capital Tasting the Eastern promise: Top 10 VC companies investing in Russia “I want a robot in every home” – Mail.ru’s Dmitry Grishin explains $25m fund for personal robotics , out of based on ratings All images in this article are subject to the Creative-Commons-Lizenz (credit - no editing, CC BY-ND , link to the legally-binding license agreement). Excluded are pictures that are labelled differently, including from Panthermedia, Fotolia, Pixelio, Morguefile, along with press photos or publishers' own visual material.

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