Fort Collins, CO, United States
Fort Collins, CO, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Symbios Technologies, Inc., a world-leading developer of dynamic aqueous plasma technology platforms, announced today that the company has engaged in a collaborative research partnership with Colorado State University (CSU) through a five-year Master Research and Development Agreement (MRDA) with the CSU Office of the Vice President for Research. This agreement is designed to further the commercialization of the company’s technology and the mission of CSU as a modern land-grant university. The MRDA outlines the working relationship between Symbios and CSU’s world-renowned programs in agriculture, engineering, veterinary medicine, biomedical sciences, chemistry, oncology, biology, and many other disciplines that have established CSU as an international academic and research leader. Through the MRDA, Symbios has sponsored research agreements, technology transfer, and joint intellectual property development via faculty collaborations and employment. Currently, Symbios is collaborating with CSU's Dr. Douglas Thamm, professor of Oncology and director of Clinical Research at the CSU Flint Animal Cancer Center. Dr. Thamm, a veterinary oncologist, is a consultant on Symbios' current National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant from the National Cancer Institute. In addition, Symbios engaged CSU graduate Jessica Joslin, who has a doctorate in physical chemistry, as a National Science Foundation (NSF) postdoctoral fellow. Joslin was subsequently hired as the company’s senior scientist and serves as the principal investigator on two NIH grants in collaboration with CSU. Through the partnership, Symbios has provided multiple internships to CSU engineering students; James McCall was recently hired as the company’s chemical & biological engineer. CSU also hosts Symbios as one of the companies in residence at the CSU Research Innovation Center at the Infectious Disease Research Center on the Foothills Campus, further facilitating contracts with multiple laboratories and manufacturing facilities on campus. “The Office of the Vice President for Research helps fulfill the land-grant mission of CSU by fostering and supporting the research enterprise, promoting scholarship and artistry, instilling a culture of integrity, and capitalizing on opportunities to address global challenges,” said Mark Wdowik, assistant vice president for Research & Industry Partnerships. “The collaboration with Symbios has resulted in a significant investment in CSU research. We anticipate many times that level of engagement, as well as possible licensing of CSU and jointly-developed technologies, as part of Symbios' ongoing collaborations with CSU faculty and students, centers and startup companies, and other private and public partners.” Justin Bzdek, Symbios president & CEO, said, “CSU has been an outstanding resource to help Symbios commercialize our groundbreaking plasma technology. This agreement will help facilitate further collaborative work with the CSU Flint Animal Cancer Center as well as other research faculty who can utilize our low-power, continuous flow plasma technology to develop applications to treat some of the most difficult to remediate industrial processes and wastewater and generate advanced chemotherapeutics and anti-infective products to reduce the global impact of deadly diseases.” Alan Rudolph, vice president for Research at CSU, also hailed this partnership. “Collaborative research relationships like the one with Symbios play a critical role in driving innovations from laboratories to the marketplace," he said. "As companies seek new product pipelines, more of them are turning to CSU, which is well-known for its core technical and research and development strengths, its ability to solve today’s complex problems across a broad range of industries, and its capabilities to provide independent, third-party assessments.” Symbios Technologies, Inc. is a world-leading developer of dynamic aqueous plasma technology platforms for water treatment, specialty manufacturing, and biotherapeutic applications. The company, working with its university, government, and industrial partners, is commercializing its disruptive advanced low-cost aqueous plasma oxidation technology, the Symbios Tubular Plasma Reactor™ (TPR4000™), to clean water, preserve the environment, and protect human health while improving production economics and sustainability. Symbios Technologies’ modular reactor is low in capital cost, able to replace existing energy-hungry or poor-performing advanced oxidation processes, while reducing or eliminating the use of biocides and/or chemical additives, thus improving the overall maintenance cost of water treatment systems. The TPR4000 also has the potential to generate less toxic chemotherapy drugs and safer anti-infectives to reduce the global impact of deadly diseases. For more information, go to http://www.symbiosplasma.com/. Founded in 1870 as the Colorado Agricultural College, Colorado State University is now among the nation's leading research universities. Located in Fort Collins, CSU currently enrolls more than 33,000 students, and has more than 1,800 faculty members working in eight colleges. Colorado State University is recognized as a premier research institution and routinely ranks as one of the top American universities without a medical school in research expenditures. In Fiscal Year 2016, CSU research expenditures totaled $332 million; this was the ninth consecutive year research expenditures at the university have topped $300 million. More information is available at http://www.colostate.edu. The IDRC provides a secure, state-of-the-art facility for university investigators, government scientists, and industry representatives to collaboratively research the basic biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and epidemiology of bacteria and viruses that cause human and animal diseases. The Center provides a research environment for developing new scientific discoveries, vaccines, methods of diagnosis, and therapeutic agents for infectious agents. The CSU Research Innovation Center is a 72,000 sq. ft. research center that fosters private and public sector collaboration. The CSU Bioscience Business Incubator, located within the Research Innovation Center, is aligned with the mission of the University to provide a return on public investment in research by generating economic opportunities through new companies focused on problems or issues of public interest.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Symbios Technologies, Inc., a world-leading developer of dynamic aqueous plasma technology platforms, announced today that United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has awarded the company a patent for its tubular high-density plasma reactor, U.S. Patent # 9,346,691. The Symbios Tubular Plasma Reactor™ (TPR4000™) provides improved, lower-cost oxidation methods for ultrapure, process, and wastewater applications by simultaneously eliminating organic and microbial contamination without the need for added chemicals or producing a waste stream. The groundbreaking design of the TPR4000 combines a continuous mixing mechanism with an air-enhanced plasma discharge system. “This is an important milestone for our company and we are proud of the acknowledgement and protection of our intellectual property provided by this patent award from the USPTO,” said Justin Bzdek, president and CEO, Symbios. “The TPR’s innovative design and impressive economics as an advanced plasma oxidation system for fluid treatment also enables it to be quickly tuned for application in food & beverage, healthcare, power plant, fracking wastewater treatment, and other industrial and municipal markets.” The TPR4000 is the only technology that combines the action and chemistry of UV, ozone, peroxide, and chlorine-based technologies all in one system providing superior efficacy and lower cost vs. alternative advanced oxidation processes. “This cornerstone patent award is part of an ever expanding portfolio of innovation and patent submissions that highlights our capabilities to address the needs of our industrial partners, with technology made possible by research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program,” concluded Bzdek. Symbios Technologies, Inc. is a world-leading developer of dynamic aqueous plasma technology platforms for water treatment, specialty manufacturing, and biotherapeutic applications. The company, working with its university, government and industrial partners is commercializing its disruptive advanced low-cost aqueous plasma oxidation technology, the Symbios Tubular Plasma Reactor™ (TPR4000™), to clean water, preserve the environment, and protect human health as well as improve production economics and sustainability. Symbios Technologies’ modular reactor is low in capital cost, able to replace existing energy-hungry or poor-performing advanced oxidation processes, reduce or eliminate the use of biocides, reduce or eliminate chemical additives, and reduce the overall maintenance cost of water treatment systems, in particular extending the life and reducing fouling of membranes. For more information, go to http://www.symbiosplasma.com/. The National Science Foundation (NSF) awards nearly $190 million annually to startups and small businesses through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, transforming scientific discovery into products and services with commercial and societal impact. The non-dilutive grants support research and development (R&D) across all areas of science and technology helping companies de-risk technology for commercial success. The NSF is an independent federal agency with a budget of about $7 billion that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

Five years ago, Congress set a goal of 500 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol produced in 2012. Although progress has been made, EPA has drastically reduced its 2012 U.S. production projection to only 8.65 million gallons. This huge shortfall is due to many factors, including high capital costs of existing technologies for converting cellulosic biomass feedstocks to sugars, leading to difficulty financing new facilities, and high operating costs of using acid solutions and cellulase enzymes in traditional processing methods. EPA has carefully chosen to set standards that balance the uncertainty of commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production this year with the goal of promoting growth of the cellulosic biofuels industry. The problem is producing sugars at low enough cost to supplant corn-based sugars. Therefore, there is a clear need for next-generation cellulosic biomass processing technologies that reduce the cost of fermentable sugars production, both in terms of capital costs and operating costs. In Phase I of our STTR project designed to address this problem, we propose to develop and test a novel Catalytic Membrane Reactor (CMR) that simultaneously solubilizes and hydrolyzes biomass and separates hydrolyzed monomeric sugars in an economically efficient manner. Our process is designed to eliminate toxic sulfuric acid and expensive enzymes. The technology exploits our unique ability to tailor the surface of these ceramic membranes in order to impart the desired catalytic properties in a highly controlled manner. The overall goal of this multiphase project is to create a scalable system for the lowest cost production of sugars from cellulosic biomass, thereby overcoming a major hindrance in the manufacture of fuels and other chemicals from renewable biomass feedstocks. By creating an immobilized ionic liquid at the membrane surface, the cellulose is solubilized at the catalyst surface. Since the catalyst is immobilized on the membrane surface, no catalyst recovery step is required. Sugars are removed as they are produced, thus preventing degradation of the sugars and maximizing yields. The hydrolysate detoxification step after pretreatment and prior to fermentation will consequently be eliminated. We will build on extensive preliminary data to further optimize the catalytic membranes. Based on data obtained, an economic analysis of our technology vs. other existing technologies will be conducted in order to prove feasibility of a 40% cost reduction in cellulosic ethanol production. Successful completion of the work proposed here will result in a membrane modification protocol and a bench-scale CMR ready for Phase II scale-up. Symbios and collaborator University of Arkansas believe the requested STTR funding will prove feasibility of using the CMR to improve the economics of cellulosic biorefinery processing by eliminating costly enzymes, reducing biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis process steps from three to one, eliminating consumable acid catalyst use, decreasing sugar degradation, and speeding the process by over an order of magnitude relative to enzymatic hydrolysis.


Patent
Symbios Technologies Llc | Date: 2011-05-13

An apparatus and method for simultaneously removing materials from fluids without the need for added chemicals, and without the formation of toxic byproducts, by high-density plasma reaction chemistry is described. Applications to removal of contaminants, such as pesticides, organics, PPCPs, and pathogens, as examples, from water are discussed. Changes in the quality of the raw water are not expected to adversely affect the decontamination process.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.95K | Year: 2016

Despite significant advances in chemotherapeutic approaches due to new drugs and combinatorial therapies over the past decades cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the United States Further pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly cancer types with only a chance of patient survival five years past diagnosis In this Phase I SBIR proposal the Tubular Plasma ReactorTM TPR platform developed by Symbios Technologies Inc will be used to generate reactive plasma species in aqueous solutions via a low temperature plasma discharge This technology encompasses the formation of aqueous plasma chemotherapeutic APC solutions which are intended to be applied for selective pancreatic cancer cell modification to address critical cancer therapy needs The TPR platform enables the environmentally friendly production of APC to provide clinicians with the flexibility of multiple routes of administration The formation of plasma species within aqueous solutions sets TPR generated APC apart from other plasma based technologies More specifically previous work has shown that the use of gas phase plasma plumes directed on cell cultures resulted in the selective inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth while not harming normal endothelial cells However such gas phase plumes restrict the use to topical applications which are not useful for the treatment of internal tumors Preliminary data collected by Symbios Technologies employing TPR generated APC demonstrates the selective dose dependent treatment of cancer cells while normal cells remained viable across all doses Thus this proposal is focused on four major goals a optimize APC generation for maximum therapeutic efficacy b expand the investigation of APC to multiple pancreatic cancer lines that exhibit differences in resistance to the current standard treatment c quantify the relevant stable plasma species that contribute to the therapeutic action to inform mechanistic insights and to evaluate shelf life and serum scavenging and d identify the mechanism of action associated with APC inhibition of cancer cell growth Overall the APC preliminary data collected combined with previous literature regarding the therapeutic properties of plasma species supports the hypothesis that the TPR represents a viable platform for generating chemotherapeutic solutions Thus Symbios will be the first to combine aqueous plasma chemistry with chemotherapeutic effects to result in a commercially viable cancer treatment modality Completion of Phase I objectives will make possible in vivo animal cancer models in Phase II Because there is a great unmet need for improved pancreatic cancer treatments Symbios Technologies Inc is developing its promising new method for selectively killing cancer cells that uses an aqueous low temperature electric discharge plasma system Prior art demonstrates that cancer cells are selectively damaged by plasma plumes compared to normal cells but these gas phase plasmas are not practical for treating tumors inside the body The aqueous plasma chemotherapeutic solutions that are generated by Symbios technology platform to contain therapeutic plasma species show great promise to overcome a major hurdle in the field by representing a new pancreatic cancer treatment modality that demonstrates selective and dose dependent cancer cell inhibition as supported by preliminary data


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.98K | Year: 2016

The prevalence of healthcare associated infections is a critical issue in the medical community resulting in compromised patient healthcare and billions of dollars in corrective costs Chronic non healing wounds affect approximately million people in the US each year with an estimated annual cost of $ $ billion As such new methods are needed for producing antimicrobial agents to treat microbes resistant to existing anti microbial agents in healthcare settings In this Phase I SBIR proposal Symbios Technologies plasma technology will be applied toward the production of anti infective solutions In collaboration with CHD Bioscience Symbios will develop and optimize a Selective Plasma Oxidation Reactor SPOR for the alternate production of CHD s flagship product VERIOXTM VERIOX is a proprietary blend of peroxyacid compounds that demonstrates antimicrobial effects against a wide range of microbial contaminants and is greatly promising as a commercial anti infective healthcare product However the current VERIOX batch manufacturing process is cost safety and efficiency limited since it reacts hydrogen peroxide with high concentrations of pyruvic acid at C Due to high HOOH levels and low temperatures the production of VERIOX is currently cost prohibitive and CHD has a difficult time identifying contract manufacturing organizations To overcome such issues the Symbios SPOR represents a critical advancement to allow for production of commercially relevant volumes of VERIOX in a safe continuous and low cost fashion Use of the SPOR does not require external addition of HOOH due to plasma production of oxidant species additionally the SPOR can be employed in a continuous flow configuration to prevent the safety concerns associated with batch production Preliminary evidence suggests that the Symbios platform is able to convert pyruvic acid to peroxyacid despite the presence of iron containing surfaces that compromise peroxyacid stability Thus this Phase I proposal will include a upgrading the reactor to eliminate iron surfaces followed by b optimization of the system for peroxyacid production and analysis of the SPOR produced solutions compared to VERIOX c preliminary disinfection efficacy studies and d economic modeling to inform commercial scaling of the SPOR Overall use of the Symbios SPOR platform as an alternate manufacturing platform will enable mass production of VERIOX in a safer and more cost effective manner which will enable the commercial readiness of VERIOX in the healthcare space Phase I work will set up nicely for Phase II where a more in depth compositional analysis will be performed along with additional efficacy studies employing animal wound healing models Because there is a great unmet need for new anti infective products and scalable methods of manufacture Symbios Technologies Inc is working in collaboration with its partner CHD Bioscience Inc to develop a Selective Plasma Oxidation Reactor SPOR that can replace the current manufacturing platform for CHD s antimicrobial and wound healing product VERIOX The current VERIOX production method is severely limited by cost and safety issues where the Symbios SPOR technology will enable production of commercially relevant volumes of VERIOX in a safe continuous and low cost fashion as supported by preliminary evidence The VERIOX product a proprietary blend of peroxyacid compounds shows great efficacy against a wide range of microbial contaminants and is greatly promising as an anti infective healthcare product thus the ability to enable commercial readiness of VERIOX will represent a marked improvement in the healthcare space


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project from Symbios Technologies LLC advances a
novel plasma reactor method to oxidize organic matter in untreated water. This method has further potential to
destroy harmful substances such as pesticides, pathogens, and some inorganics. A provisional patent covering this
technology has been filed with the U.S. Patent office. In earlier research, a proof-of-concept batch apparatus
demonstrated that this reactor could destroy selected organic compounds and pathogens. However, this early
version could not be economically scaled up nor run in a continuous mode. This Phase I project will build a new
apparatus design at a laboratory scale, capable of treating water continuously. Studies will then be conducted to
verify the effectiveness of the new reactor design, and to investigate the mechanisms and kinetics of the
degradation of a selected organic compound.
The broader/commercial impacts of this research are: an economical and effective method to treat raw
water, input water, industrial wastewater, and contaminated potable water; and potential portability to desired
locations. There are several ongoing incidences of waterborne diseases in many parts of the world and economical
options for on-site treatment are limited. Our analytical projections indicate that it would be feasible to treat large
quantities of untreated water economically on a commercial scale using a portable system. Furthermore, this
apparatus would be compatible with renewable energy sources and with extended applications to remote sites, such
as military bases and disaster relief operations.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 635.44K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will support the final development and commercialization of Symbios Technologies plasma treatment system to allow produced water in the oil and gas industry to be effectively treated, thereby allowing its safe discharge to surface waters or recycling to stimulate production in new wells, rather than being disposed of in injection wells. Produced water is the water brought to the surface, with or without hydraulic fracturing, along with the intended fuel products during extraction of oil, gas, and coal bed methane from formations underground. In general, produced water is contaminated with hydrocarbons, salts, and harmful microorganisms, meaning that it must be treated before it can be discharged or reused for agriculture and other purposes. This is an important environmental, public safety, and economic problem in the US. Research conducted during this project will be used to evaluate reactor improvements including process sensors and control systems, electrode geometries and surface coatings, degradation of contaminants in produced water, field testing, and techno-economic modeling. The anticipated technical results are that the Symbios plasma system will degrade hydrocarbon contaminants and kill microorganisms in frac flowback or produced water, leaving the waters suitable for safe reuse or discharge.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that it will facilitate cleanup and reuse of a critical resource, water, in the oil and gas production industry, with crucial societal benefits for protecting the environment, guarding human safety, and keeping domestic energy costs down. The proposed technology is based on an innovative, low-voltage plasma discharge that creates powerful oxidizing species for destroying biological and chemical contaminants in produced water. Symbios Technologies has developed relationships and executed agreements with key companies in the produced water treatment field, which have identified numerous near-term business opportunities and provided crucial insights into preparing the technology for commercial success during Phase II. The customer-centered emphasis on solving water contamination problems in the oil and gas industry, which was estimated to have a global market size of $45 billion in 2010, will result in a high likelihood for commercial success. The Phase II R&D plan will enhance scientific and technical understanding as well as commercial impact by addressing reactor improvements pertaining to corrosion resistance and automated operation for a market-ready system, treatment of microbial and organic contaminants in produced water, on- site testing, and demonstration of economic competitiveness of the developed system.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 401.03K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will support the final development and commercialization of Symbios Technologies plasma treatment system to allow produced water in the oil and gas industry to be effectively treated, thereby allowing its safe discharge to surface waters or recycling to stimulate production in new wells, rather than being disposed of in injection wells. Produced water is the water brought to the surface, with or without hydraulic fracturing, along with the intended fuel products during extraction of oil, gas, and coal bed methane from formations underground. In general, produced water is contaminated with hydrocarbons, salts, and harmful microorganisms, meaning that it must be treated before it can be discharged or reused for agriculture and other purposes. This is an important environmental, public safety, and economic problem in the US. Research conducted during this project will be used to evaluate reactor improvements including process sensors and control systems, electrode geometries and surface coatings, degradation of contaminants in produced water, field testing, and techno-economic modeling. The anticipated technical results are that the Symbios plasma system will degrade hydrocarbon contaminants and kill microorganisms in frac flowback or produced water, leaving the waters suitable for safe reuse or discharge. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that it will facilitate cleanup and reuse of a critical resource, water, in the oil and gas production industry, with crucial societal benefits for protecting the environment, guarding human safety, and keeping domestic energy costs down. The proposed technology is based on an innovative, low-voltage plasma discharge that creates powerful oxidizing species for destroying biological and chemical contaminants in produced water. Symbios Technologies has developed relationships and executed agreements with key companies in the produced water treatment field, which have identified numerous near-term business opportunities and provided crucial insights into preparing the technology for commercial success during Phase II. The customer-centered emphasis on solving water contamination problems in the oil and gas industry, which was estimated to have a global market size of $45 billion in 2010, will result in a high likelihood for commercial success. The Phase II R & D plan will enhance scientific and technical understanding as well as commercial impact by addressing reactor improvements pertaining to corrosion resistance and automated operation for a market-ready system, treatment of microbial and organic contaminants in produced water, on- site testing, and demonstration of economic competitiveness of the developed system.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

Cooling water systems in thermal power plants are notoriously difficult to maintain because they provide the ideal, warm environments for the growth of algae and bacteria. This biofouling can lead to corrosion and cracking of cooling pipes in heat exchangers. Conventionally, disinfection chemicals are added into the circulation to inhibit microbial growth, but this practice requires consumable chemicals such as chlorine, and is hindered when the microbes are protected within surface-adherent biofilms leading to the need for waste-stream discharge cleanup with regulatory issues and expense. Symbios Technologies has developed a low temperature plasma technology for effectively and efficiently destroying microorganisms in water. The plasma in our system generates high oxidation potential species, and these reactive species cause rapid destruction of the biological matter, making it ideal for disinfecting power plant cooling water. The specific goals of Phase I are to design, construct, and utilize a low temperature plasma reactor to destroy selected biofouling organisms found in power plant cooling water systems, including iron reducing and sulfate reducing bacteria, pathogenic bacteria, and algae. It is the purpose of this SBIR Phase I grant request to develop and test a laboratory-scale, biological disinfection version of Symbios Technologies plasma reactor and to test the treatment concept on continuous flow of contaminated water while also offering the potential for scalability and commercial development. In Phase II of this project, a commercial-scale prototype reactor would be developed for power plant type heat exchanger applications. The overall goal of the combined Phase I and II projects is to develop a commercially viable method to control biofouling in power plant cooling water systems based on the use of our low temperature plasma technology. Other benefits of this Symbios technology include capability to provide an economical and cost-effective method to treat raw water, input water, industrial wastewater, and contaminated potable water to protect human and environmental health. It is internationally recognized that clean water is a limited economic resource, and new technologies are being sought to economically recycle and reuse processed water, especially in remote locations. Due to its low power requirements and no need for consumable chemical reagents, this apparatus would be compatible with renewable energy sources and for extended applications to remote sites, such as military bases, Superfund sites, and disaster relief operations.

Loading Symbios Technologies Llc collaborators
Loading Symbios Technologies Llc collaborators