Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Miami, FL, United States

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Miami, FL, United States
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BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kyruus, a leader in provider search and scheduling solutions for health systems, announced today that the University of Miami Health System (“UHealth”) has selected the company’s patient access applications to enhance patient experience across multiple points of access. The only South Florida-based academic medical center will utilize ProviderMatch for Access Centers, ProviderMatch for Consumers and the KyruusOne provider data management platform to help patients easily find the right providers based on their clinical needs and logistical preferences. UHealth sought a comprehensive solution that would enable it to offer a truly differentiated patient experience. They also prioritized a solution that could provide consistency for patients looking for providers both on the UHealth website or when calling into its access center. Kyruus was unique in its ability to deploy the same patient-provider matching technology at both entry points. ProviderMatch will also accommodate searches in both English and Spanish, a critical need given the health system’s diverse patient population. “At the University of Miami Health System, we know that delivering an exceptional patient experience is essential to stand out in a competitive market. That experience begins with the first interaction a patient has with us,” said Roymi V. Membiela, Chief Experience Officer and Associate VP of Marketing & Communications at UHealth. “As such, it’s critical for us to identify the most appropriate provider quickly and easily, based on the needs of each patient - a key reason we chose Kyruus’ multi-channel solution.” UHealth will also leverage the KyruusOne provider data management platform to unify provider data into a centralized directory and ensure patients and call center agents have access to detailed, consistent, and up-to-date provider profiles. “With the 15,000-term Kyruus Clinical Library, our providers can configure extremely detailed profiles, making it significantly easier for patients and agents to make more clinically-appropriate matches,” said Dr. Thinh Tran, Chief Clinical Officer & Chief Operating Officer at UHealth. “We’re committed to ensuring our patients can find the right providers for their needs and that providers, in turn, can see the patients requiring their specific clinical focus area.” “Patient access doesn’t belong to a single department – it’s an enterprise-wide challenge,” said Graham Gardner, CEO of Kyruus. “UHealth recognizes the integral role access plays in a patient’s broader experience and we’re honored to work with the UHealth team to help them integrate their access center and marketing efforts to deliver a cohesive and differentiated patient experience.” About University of Miami Health System The University of Miami Health System delivers transformational patient care by the region’s most comprehensive team of doctors, powered by the groundbreaking research and medical education of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. As South Florida’s only academic-based health care system, UHealth is a vital component of the community. UHealth combines a superior approach to patient care, with research, education and academic excellence to create a personalized health care delivery system that is unparalleled, treating patients as individuals and guiding them uniquely through their health care journey. Within the UHealth system, patients can participate in clinical trials and benefit from the latest developments that are fast-tracked from the laboratory to the bedside. UHealth’s comprehensive network includes three hospitals, more than one dozen outpatient facilities in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Collier counties, with more than 1,200 physicians and scientists. Its flagship facility, The Lennar Foundation Medical Center, opened December 2016 in Coral Gables, marks a new era in health care delivery that brings together the expertise of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, the University of Miami Health System Sports Medicine Institute and many other specialty services. About Kyruus Kyruus delivers proven provider search and scheduling solutions that help hospitals and health systems match patients with the providers best suited to care for them. The ProviderMatch suite of solutions—for consumers, access centers, and referral networks—enables a consistent patient experience across multiple points of access, while aligning provider supply with patient demand. The company’s proprietary provider data management platform forms the foundation of its solutions, powering them with accurate data by coupling data processing with administrative applications. To find out why a Better Match Means Better Care, visit www.kyruus.com.


HOLLYWOOD, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Erin Andrews, host of ABC’s Dancing with the Stars, reporter with Fox Sports and cervical cancer survivor, will be a special guest at a forum designed to provide patients and families with an overview of the impact of cervical cancer, available support programs and the need for new, innovative treatments. “Latest Advances in Cervical Cancer: Living with the Disease,” an event hosted by Gilda’s Club South Florida in collaboration with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Health System, and sponsored by Advaxis, Inc. (NASDAQ:ADXS), will be held Thursday, May 18, at 5 p.m. at the Diplomat Beach Resort in Hollywood, Fla. Space is limited and registration is required. Please register at www.advaxis.com/forum2017 on or before Tuesday, May 16. The event features Ms. Andrews, who will discuss her life experiences and career, including her journey to becoming a cervical cancer survivor. Ms. Andrews was diagnosed and treated early during the 2016 NFL season. Erin will tell her story in a moderated discussion and Q&A. The event program also includes leading oncologists, researchers and patient advocates who will discuss the details of cervical cancer, new advances in care and programs to support patients and families fighting this disease. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and each year about 13,000 women in the United States are diagnosed. Annually, approximately 4,200 U.S. lives are lost to the disease. More than 90 percent of cervical cancer cases can be attributed to strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is now the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, with recently published research showing that 39.9 percent of U.S. women are infected. Over the past 30 years there has only been one new product approved for the treatment of cervical cancer, and patients and families need additional support and new treatments. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center offers patients with cervical cancer access to available treatment options including chemo-radiation therapy. The cancer center is also a trial site for Advaxis’ global Phase 3 AIM2CERV trial, which is evaluating axalimogene filolisbac in patients with high-risk, locally advanced cervical cancer. Axalimogene filolisbac, a targeted Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-based immunotherapy, is the only known cancer immunotherapy agent shown in preclinical studies to alert the body’s immune system to the presence of cancer, diminish that cancer’s natural defense mechanisms and then rally the body’s killer T cells to attack the cancer. Currently, AIM2CERV is the only active industry-sponsored global phase 3 clinical trial in cervical cancer. Axalimogene filolisbac and other advances in cervical cancer will be discussed during the event on May 18. The speaking program, which will be followed by a reception, also includes: About Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide. An estimated 13,000 new cases will be diagnosed in the United States in 2016, and 4,100 women will have this disease as their cause of death, according to the National Cancer Institute. Decades of research have shown that persistent HPV infection, particularly with high-risk virus types such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, is the most important factor in the development of cervical cancer. The prognosis for women with advanced and recurrent cervical cancer remains poor, with median survival of only six to seven months following initiation of palliative treatment with chemotherapy. According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for Stage IV disease is at 15 to 16 percent. There is no approved therapy following failure of first-line treatment, and there has been limited advancement in developing new therapeutics for advanced cervical cancer over the last 30 years. About Gilda’s Club Gilda’s Club, was named in honor of comedian Gilda Radner, who lost her battle with ovarian cancer in 1989 at 42 years old. Gilda’s Club South Florida’s mission is to create welcoming communities of free support for everyone living with cancer – men, women, teens, and children – along with their families and friends. Our innovative program is an essential complement to medical care, providing networking and support groups, workshops, education and social activities. Gilda’s Club has been providing programs to those living with cancer and their family and friends in South Florida since 1997. About Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – the University of Miami Health System and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, is among the nation’s leading cancer centers and South Florida's only Cancer Center of Excellence. A 2015 study by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, showed that cancer patients treated at Sylvester have a 10 percent higher chance of survival than those treated at nearly any other cancer center in the nation. With the combined strength of more than 120 cancer researchers and 130 cancer specialists, Sylvester discovers, develops and delivers more targeted therapies, providing the next generation of cancer clinical care – precision cancer medicine – to each patient. Our comprehensive diagnostics, coupled with teams of scientific and clinical experts who specialize in just one type of cancer, enable us to better understand each patient’s individual cancer and develop treatments that target the cells and genes driving the cancer's growth and survival, leading to better outcomes. At Sylvester, patients have access to more treatment options and more cancer clinical trials than most hospitals in the southeastern United States. To better serve current and future patients, Sylvester has a network of conveniently located outpatient treatment facilities in Miami, Kendall, Hollywood, Plantation, Deerfield Beach, Coral Springs, and Coral Gables. For more information, visit sylvester.org. About Advaxis, Inc. Located in Princeton, N.J., Advaxis, Inc. is a biotechnology company developing multiple cancer immunotherapies based on its proprietary Lm Technology™. The Lm Technology, using bioengineered live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) bacteria, is the only known cancer immunotherapy agent shown in preclinical studies to both generate cancer fighting T cells directed against cancer antigens and neutralize Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that protect the tumor microenvironment from immunologic attack and contribute to tumor growth. Advaxis' lead Lm Technology immunotherapy, axalimogene filolisbac, targets HPV-associated cancers and is in clinical trials for three potential indications: Phase 3 in invasive cervical cancer, Phase 2 in head and neck cancer, and Phase 2 in anal cancer. The FDA has granted axalimogene filolisbac orphan drug designation for each of these three clinical settings, as well as Fast Track designation for adjuvant therapy for HRLACC patients and a SPA for the Phase 3 AIM2CERV trial in HRLACC patients. Axalimogene filolisbac has also been classified as an advanced therapy medicinal product for the treatment of cervical cancer by the EMA’s CAT. Advaxis has two additional immunotherapy products: ADXS-PSA in prostate cancer and ADXS-HER2 in HER2 expressing solid tumors, in human clinical development. In addition, Advaxis and Amgen are developing ADXS-NEO, an investigational cancer immunotherapy treatment designed to activate a patient's immune system to respond against the unique mutations, or neoepitopes, contained in and identified from each individual patient's tumor, with plans to enter the clinic in 2017. To learn more about Advaxis, visit www.advaxis.com and connect on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube. Advaxis Forward-Looking Statement This press release contains forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, statements regarding Advaxis’ ability to develop the next generation of cancer immunotherapies, and the safety and efficacy of Advaxis’ proprietary immunotherapy, axalimogene filolisbac. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks including the risk factors set forth from time to time in Advaxis’ SEC filings including, but not limited to, its report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2016, which is available at http://www.sec.gov. Any forward-looking statements set forth in this presentation speak only as of the date of this presentation. We do not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that occur after the date hereof other than as required by law. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Many things go wrong in cells during the development of cancer. At the heart of the chaos are often genetic switches that control the production of new cells. In a particularly aggressive form of leukemia, called acute myeloid leukemia, a genetic switch that regulates the maturation of blood stem cells into red and white blood cells goes awry. Normally, this switch leads to appropriate numbers of white and red blood cells. But patients with acute myeloid leukemia end up with a dangerous accumulation of blood stem cells and a lack of red and white blood cells -- cells that are needed to supply the body with oxygen and fight infections. Now, researchers at Caltech and the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami are narrowing in on a protein that helps control this genetic switch. In healthy individuals, the protein, called DPF2, stops the production of red and white blood cells when they do not need to be replaced. That is, it turns the switch off. But the protein can be overproduced in acute myeloid leukemia patients. The protein basically sits on the switch, preventing it from turning back on to make the blood cells as needed. Patients who overproduce DPF2 have a particularly poor prognosis. In a new study, to be published the week of May 22, 2017, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers demonstrate new ways to impede DPF2, potentially rendering acute myeloid leukemia more treatable. They report new structural and functional details about a fragment of DPF2. This new information reveals targets for the development of drugs that would block the protein's function. "Many human diseases, including cancers, arise because of malfunctioning genetic switches," says André Hoelz, the corresponding author of the study. Hoelz is a professor of chemistry at Caltech, a Heritage Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Investigator, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholar. "Elucidating how they work at atomic detail allows us to begin the process of custom tailoring drugs to inactivate them and in many cases that is a significant step towards a cure." Red and white blood cells are constantly regenerated from blood stem cells, which reside in our bone marrow. Like other stem cells, blood stem cells can live forever. It is only when they become differentiated into specific cell types, such as red and white blood cells, that they then become mortal, or acquire the ability to die after a certain period of time. "Our bodies use a complex series of genetic switches to differentiate a blood stem cell into many different cell types. These differentiated cells then circulate in the blood and serve a variety of different functions. When these cells reach the end of their lifespan they need to be replaced," says Hoelz. "This is somewhat like replacing used tires on a car." To investigate the role of DPF2 and learn more about how it controls the genetic switch for making blood cells, the Hoelz group partnered with Stephen D. Nimer, co-corresponding author of the paper and director of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and his team. First, Ferdinand Huber and Andrew Davenport -- both graduate students at Caltech in the Hoelz group and co-first-authors of the new study--obtained crystals of a portion of the DPF2 protein containing a domain known as a PHD finger, which stands for planet homeodomain. They then used X-ray crystallography, a process that involves exposing protein crystals to high-energy X-rays, to solve the structure of the PHD finger domain. The technique was performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, using a dedicated beamline of Caltech's Molecular Observatory. The results revealed how DPF2 binds to a DNA-protein complex, called the nucleosome, to block the production of red and white blood cells. The protein "reads" various signals displayed on the nucleosome surface by adopting a shape that fits various modifications on the nucleosome complex, like the different shaped pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Once the protein binds to this DNA locus, DPF2 turns off the switch that regulates blood cell differentiation. The next step was to see if DPF2 could be blocked in human blood stem cells in the lab. Sarah Greenblatt, a postdoctoral associate in Nimer's group and co-first author of the study, used the structural information from Hoelz's group to create a mutated version of the protein. The Nimer group then introduced the mutated protein in blood stem cells, and found that the mutated DPF2 could no longer bind to the nucleosome. In other words, DPF2 could no longer inactivate the switch for making blood cells. "The mutated DPF2 was unable to bind to specific regions in the genome and could not halt blood stem cell differentiation," says Huber. "Whether DPF2 can also be blocked in the cancer patients themselves remains to be seen." The researchers say a structural socket in DPF2, one of the puzzle-piece-like regions identified in the new study, is a good target for candidate drugs. The study, titled "Histone-Binding of DPF2 Mediates Its Repressive Role in Myeloid Differentiation," was funded by a PhD fellowship of the Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds, a National Institutes of Health Research Service Award, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, a Faculty Scholar Award of the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute, the Heritage Medical Research Institute, Caltech startup funds, the Albert Wyrick V Scholar Award of the V Foundation for Cancer Research, a Kimmel Scholar Award of the Sidney Kimmel Foundation for Cancer Research, and a Teacher-Scholar Award of the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation. Other authors are Concepcion Martinez and Ye Xu of the University of Miami and Ly P. Vu of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: phys.org

A crystal structure of a portion of human DPF2, a protein that controls a genetic switch that tells blood stem cells when to become red and white blood cells. Orange and yellow regions illustrate the DPF2 'reader' domain, which is stabilized by zinc ions, represented as red and grey spheres. Credit: Hoelz Lab/Caltech Many things go wrong in cells during the development of cancer. At the heart of the chaos are often genetic switches that control the production of new cells. In a particularly aggressive form of leukemia, called acute myeloid leukemia, a genetic switch that regulates the maturation of blood stem cells into red and white blood cells goes awry. Normally, this switch leads to appropriate numbers of white and red blood cells. But patients with acute myeloid leukemia end up with a dangerous accumulation of blood stem cells and a lack of red and white blood cells—cells that are needed to supply the body with oxygen and fight infections. Now, researchers at Caltech and the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami are narrowing in on a protein that helps control this genetic switch. In healthy individuals, the protein, called DPF2, stops the production of red and white blood cells when they do not need to be replaced. That is, it turns the switch off. But the protein can be overproduced in acute myeloid leukemia patients. The protein basically sits on the switch, preventing it from turning back on to make the blood cells as needed. Patients who overproduce DPF2 have a particularly poor prognosis. In a new study, to be published the week of May 22, 2017, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers demonstrate new ways to impede DPF2, potentially rendering acute myeloid leukemia more treatable. They report new structural and functional details about a fragment of DPF2. This new information reveals targets for the development of drugs that would block the protein's function. "Many human diseases, including cancers, arise because of malfunctioning genetic switches," says André Hoelz, the corresponding author of the study. Hoelz is a professor of chemistry at Caltech, a Heritage Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Investigator, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholar. "Elucidating how they work at atomic detail allows us to begin the process of custom tailoring drugs to inactivate them and in many cases that is a significant step towards a cure." Red and white blood cells are constantly regenerated from blood stem cells, which reside in our bone marrow. Like other stem cells, blood stem cells can live forever. It is only when they become differentiated into specific cell types, such as red and white blood cells, that they then become mortal, or acquire the ability to die after a certain period of time. "Our bodies use a complex series of genetic switches to differentiate a blood stem cell into many different cell types. These differentiated cells then circulate in the blood and serve a variety of different functions. When these cells reach the end of their lifespan they need to be replaced," says Hoelz. "This is somewhat like replacing used tires on a car." To investigate the role of DPF2 and learn more about how it controls the genetic switch for making blood cells, the Hoelz group partnered with Stephen D. Nimer, co-corresponding author of the paper and director of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and his team. First, Ferdinand Huber and Andrew Davenport—both graduate students at Caltech in the Hoelz group and co-first-authors of the new study—obtained crystals of a portion of the DPF2 protein containing a domain known as a PHD finger, which stands for planet homeodomain. They then used X-ray crystallography, a process that involves exposing protein crystals to high-energy X-rays, to solve the structure of the PHD finger domain. The technique was performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, using a dedicated beamline of Caltech's Molecular Observatory. The results revealed how DPF2 binds to a DNA-protein complex, called the nucleosome, to block the production of red and white blood cells. The protein "reads" various signals displayed on the nucleosome surface by adopting a shape that fits various modifications on the nucleosome complex, like the different shaped pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Once the protein binds to this DNA locus, DPF2 turns off the switch that regulates blood cell differentiation. The next step was to see if DPF2 could be blocked in human blood stem cells in the lab. Sarah Greenblatt, a postdoctoral associate in Nimer's group and co-first author of the study, used the structural information from Hoelz's group to create a mutated version of the protein. The Nimer group then introduced the mutated protein in blood stem cells, and found that the mutated DPF2 could no longer bind to the nucleosome. In other words, DPF2 could no longer inactivate the switch for making blood cells. "The mutated DPF2 was unable to bind to specific regions in the genome and could not halt blood stem cell differentiation," says Huber. "Whether DPF2 can also be blocked in the cancer patients themselves remains to be seen." The researchers say a structural socket in DPF2, one of the puzzle-piece-like regions identified in the new study, is a good target for candidate drugs. Explore further: Researchers show p300 protein may suppress leukemia in MDS patients More information: Ferdinand M. Huber el al., "Histone-binding of DPF2 mediates its repressive role in myeloid differentiation," PNAS (2017). www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1700328114


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, May 29, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics, 2017-2030" report to their offering. Cancer metabolism is based on the principle that cancer cells, as compared to normal cells, have different metabolic activities in order to support their enhanced energy and anabolic requirements. The pioneering discovery by Otto Warburg in the middle of the 20th century led to the observation that metabolic activity in tumor tissues leads to a ten-fold increase in production of lactate (from glucose) under aerobic conditions. This revelation generated a significant interest and led industry stakeholders to target metabolic pathways in an effort to find the treatment of cancer. In addition, several academic players have also initiated studies to explore the functional consequences of alterations in various metabolic pathways. The idea behind therapeutic strategies that target cancer metabolism is to limit/modulate the supply of crucial nutrients in cancer cells in order to induce cell death. Over the years, experimental and conceptual advances in this field have resulted in a better understanding of the role of metabolic pathways for the treatment of cancer. Owing to the complex nature of these pathways, innovation in this domain has been gradual. However, the knowledge that metabolic adaptations in cancer cells promote their malignant properties has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment; selective inhibition of altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells is believed to be a highly promising approach. Currently, there are several molecules that are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. Extensive research is currently being carried out to explore the potential of certain enzymes of metabolic pathways to act as targets for the treatment of cancer. The alterations in metabolic pathways in cancer cells are often mediated by mutations in oncogenes and cell signaling pathways. However, with the recognition of specific enzymes within each metabolic pathway, it is anticipated that drugs targeting these enzymes are likely to have high efficacy in treating cancer with minimal side-effects. The "Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market, 2017-2030" report provides an extensive study on the current landscape of the emerging pipeline of novel drugs that target metabolic pathways in cancer cells and offers a comprehensive discussion on the likely future potential. Despite the fact that the field of cancer metabolism therapeutics is still in early stages, there are many active players in this area. A larger proportion of players (on the basis of number of molecules) are small-sized and start-up companies. In fact, well-known big pharma companies have come together with smaller players to support discovery and development of such therapies. Our research indicates that there are several players with mid/late-stage clinical candidates that are likely to enter the market in the coming decade; examples include Agios Pharmaceuticals, Celgene, Polaris Group, Bio-Cancer Treatment International, BERG Health, Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Taiho Pharmaceutical, Novartis and 3-V Biosciences. The primary focus is on drugs that lead to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells by altering/inhibiting the activity of key enzymes/transporters that are a part of glucose metabolism, amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, lipid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. The scope includes novel products that are being specifically developed to target altered metabolic pathways and key enzymes/amino acids involved in the metabolism of cancer cells. Examples of such enzymes/amino acids include isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant (IDH 1), arginine, glutamine, MTH1, L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB3), choline kinase (ChoK), glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and hexokinase II. Specifically, certain drugs based on amino acid metabolism are being developed under the class of immuno-oncology drugs; these have been excluded from the scope of this document. The overall pipeline comprises of 48 molecules that are under development for the treatment of a variety of oncological indications. Of these, 20 molecules are undergoing clinical evaluation while others (28) are in discovery/preclinical stages. This unexploited and promising market has its hopes pinned on multiple start-ups and small-sized companies, which have received significant financial support from strategic investors and venture capital firms in the recent past. One of the key objectives of this report was to understand the current activity and the future potential of the market. The study provides a detailed market forecast and opportunity analysis from 2017 to 2030. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report are backed by a detailed understanding of the therapies targeting cancer metabolism and other targets closely associated with them. To account for uncertaintiesassociated with the development of novel therapeutics and add robustness to our model, we have provided three scenarios for our market forecast, namely the conservative, base and optimistic scenarios. All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and from primary research. All financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified. Key Topics Covered: 1. PREFACE 1.1. Scope of the Report 1.2. Research Methodology 1.3. Chapter Outlines 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3. INTRODUCTION 3.1. Chapter Overview 3.2. Cellular Metabolism: An Introduction 3.3. Cancer Cell Metabolism: An Introduction 3.4. Cancer Cell Metabolism: History and Evolution 3.5. Altered Metabolic Pathways in Cancer Cells 3.5.1. Glucose Metabolism 3.5.2. TCA Cycle 3.5.3. Amino Acid Metabolism 3.5.4. Nucleotide Metabolism 3.5.5. Pentose Phosphate Pathway 3.5.6. Lipid Metabolism 3.6. Challenges Associated with Targeting Metabolic Pathways 3.7. Targeting Altered Metabolic Pathways for Cancer Treatment 4. MARKET OVERVIEW 4.1. Chapter Overview 4.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Clinical Pipeline 4.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Preclinical Pipeline 4.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Phase of Development 4.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Targeted Metabolic Pathway 4.6. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Target 4.7. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Type of Molecule 4.8. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area 4.9. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Indication 4.10. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Route of Administration 4.11. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Key Players 4.12. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Headquarters of Developers 4.13. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Role of Non-Industry Players 5. DRUG PROFILES 5.1. Chapter Overview 5.2. Enasidenib/AG-221 (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 5.2.1. Overview 5.2.2. Mechanism of Action 5.2.3. Current Status of Development 5.2.4. Clinical Studies 5.2.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.2.6. Agios Pharmaceuticals 5.3. Ivosidenib/AG-120 (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 5.3.1. Overview 5.3.2. Mechanism of Action 5.3.3. Current Status of Development 5.3.4. Clinical Studies 5.3.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.3.6. Agios Pharmaceuticals 5.4. ADI-PEG 20 (Polaris Group) 5.4.1. Overview 5.4.2. Mechanism of Action 5.4.3. Current Status of Development 5.4.4. Clinical Studies 5.4.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.4.6. Polaris Group 5.5. BCT-100 (Bio-Cancer Treatment International) 5.5.1. Overview 5.5.2. Mechanism of Action 5.5.3. Current Status of Development 5.5.4. Clinical Studies 5.5.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.5.6. Bio-Cancer Treatment International 5.6. BPM 31510 (BERG Health) 5.6.1. Overview 5.6.2. Mechanism of Action 5.6.3. Current Status of Development 5.6.4. Clinical Studies 5.6.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.6.5.1. Preclinical Data 5.6.5.2. Clinical Data 5.6.6. BERG Health 5.6.6.1. Overview 5.6.6.2. Technology Platform: Interrogative Biology® 5.6.6.3. Future Outlook 5.7. CPI-613 (Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals) 5.7.1. Overview 5.7.2. Mechanism of Action 5.7.3. Current Status of Development 5.7.4. Clinical Studies 5.7.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.7.6. Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals 5.8. TAS-114 (Taiho Pharmaceutical) 5.8.1. Overview 5.8.2. Mechanism of Action 5.8.3. Current Status of Development 5.8.4. Clinical Studies 5.8.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.8.6. Taiho Pharmaceutical 5.9. IDH305 (Novartis) 5.9.1. Overview 5.9.2. Mechanism of Action 5.9.3. Current Status of Development 5.9.4. Clinical Studies 5.9.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.9.6. Novartis 5.10. TVB 2640 (3-V Biosciences) 5.10.1. Overview 5.10.2. Mechanism of Action 5.10.3. Current Status of Development 5.10.4. Clinical Studies 5.10.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.10.6. 3-V Biosciences 6. MARKET FORECAST AND OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS 6.1. Chapter Overview 6.2. Scope and Limitations 6.3. Forecast Methodology 6.4. Overall Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market (USD Million) 6.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market: Individual Drug Forecasts (USD Million) 6.5.1. Enasidenib (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.2. Ivosidenib (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.3. ADI-PEG 20 (Polaris Group) 6.5.4. BPM 31510 (BERG Health) 6.5.5. CPI-613 (Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.6. BCT-100 (Bio-Cancer Treatment International) 6.5.7. IDH305 (Novartis) 6.5.8. TAS-114 (Taiho Pharmaceutical) 6.5.9. TBV-2640 (3-V Biosciences) 7. VENTURE CAPITAL INTEREST 7.1. Chapter Overview 7.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: List of Funding Instances 7.2.1. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Cumulative Number of Investments by Year, Pre 2010-2017 7.2.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Cumulative Amount Invested by Year, Pre 2010-2017 (USD Million) 7.2.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution of Funding Instances by Type of Funding 7.2.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Funding Instances, Most Active Industry Players 7.2.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Funding Instances, Most Active Venture Capital Firms/Investors 8. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS 8.1. Chapter Overview 8.2. Partnership Models 8.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Recent Partnerships 9. KEY INSIGHTS 9.1. Chapter Overview 9.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Developer Landscape 9.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Targeted Metabolic Pathway, Phase of Development and Type of Molecule 9.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Geographical Presence of Companies 9.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Popularity of Metabolic Enzymes/Targets 10. CONCLUSION 10.1. Growing Understanding of Tumor Associated Metabolic Alterations has Advanced the Field of Cancer Metabolism 10.2. Commercialization of Late-Stage Drugs and Advancement of Discovery/Preclinical Candidates in the Near Future is Likely to Sustain the Momentum 10.3. Amongst Various Metabolic Pathways, Amino Acid Metabolism and Glucose Metabolism Have Been Most Widely Researched 10.4. Small Pharmaceutical Companies are Emerging as Key Players; Research is Heavily Concentrated in the US and Parts of Europe 10.5. Growing Partnerships and Venture Capital Support are Indicative of Lucrative Future Potential 10.6. Once Approved, Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics are Poised to Achieve an Accelerated Growth 11. INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS 11.1. Chapter Overview 11.2. Raul Mostoslavsky, Associate Professor, Medicine, Harvard Medical School 11.3. Magdalena Marciniak, Business Alliance Manager, Selvita S.A. 12. APPENDIX 1: TABULATED DATA 13. APPENDIX 2: LIST OF COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS Companies Mentioned - 2M Companies - 3-V Biosciences - Abbott - Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure - Adage Capital Partners - Ade Capital Sodical SCR - Admune Therapeutics - Advanced Cancer Therapeutics - Advanced Technology Ventures - Aeglea BioTherapeutics - Agios Pharmaceuticals - Aju Tech - Alexandria Venture Investments - Ally Bridge Group - Althea Partners - American Association for Cancer Research - American Society for Radiation Oncology - American Society of Clinical Oncology - American Society of Hematology - ARCH Venture Partners - Arkin Holdings - Astellas Venture Management - AstraZeneca - Atlas Venture - Barts Cancer Institute - Bayer - Becton Dickinson - BERG Health - BIND Therapeutics - Bio-Cancer Treatment International - BioMed X - Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund - Boston College - Bristol Myers Squibb - Calithera Biosciences - Cancer Research Technology - Cancer Research UK - Celgene - Chinese University of Hong Kong - Ciba-Geigy - Clave Mayor - Cloud Pharmaceuticals - Commonwealth Capital Ventures - Conegliano Ventures - Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals - Cowen Group - CRB Inverbio - Daiichi Sankyo - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute - Delphi Ventures - DesigneRx Pharmaceuticals - Emory University - Encore Vision - European Hematology Association - European Medicines Agency - European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer - European Society of Medical Oncology - Flagship Ventures - Food and Drug Administration - FORMA Therapeutics - Foundation Medicine - Genentech - German Cancer Research Center - Gilead Sciences - GNTech - Grifols - Harvard Medical School - Hong Kong Department of Health - Horizon Discovery - IDT Corporation - ImmunoMet Therapeutics - Informa - International Mesothelioma Interest Group - IOmet Pharma - J Pharma - Janssen Biotech - Jennison Associates - Kancera - Kantar Health - Karolinska Institutet - KBI Biopharma - Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation - Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers - Kyushu University - Lightstone Ventures - Lilly Ventures - Lo Ka Chung Centre for Natural Anti-Cancer Drug Development - Longwood Fund - Louisiana State University - Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research - Mary Crowley Cancer Research Centers - Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center - MD Anderson Cancer Center - Medical University of Vienna - Medidata Solutions - Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - Merck KGaA - Metabomed - MetaVest - Mirae Asset Venture Investment - Mission Bay Capital - Moleculin - Morgenthaler Ventures - MPM Capital - MS Ventures - National Cancer Institute - National Institutes of Health - New Enterprise Associates - New Medical Enzymes - New York University School of Medicine - Nimbus Therapeutics - Northwestern University - Novartis - Novartis Venture Fund - Novo - Ohio State University - Oncotherapeutics - OrbiMed - Ostuka Holdings - Partikula - Partners Innovation Fund - Pfizer - Polaris Group - Polaris Pharmaceuticals - Pontifax - Princeton University - Queen Mary Hospital - Quintiles - RA Capital Management - Raze Therapeutics - Rgenix - Rock Springs Capital - Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University - Sandoz - Selexys Pharmaceuticals - Selvita - Sofinnova Partners - Spinifex Pharmaceuticals - Sprint Bioscience - Stand Up To Cancer - Stanford University - Stanford University School of Medicine - Stockholm University - Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center - Taiho Oncology - Taiho Pharmaceutical - Taiho Ventures - TAVARGENIX - TDW Group - TDW Pharmaceuticals - Technion Research & Development Foundation - Telix Pharmaceuticals - The Abramson Family Foundation - The Chetrit Group - The Column Group - The Francis Crick Institute - The Hong Kong Polytechnic University - Therapeia - Third Rock Ventures - TPP Global Development - Translational Cancer Drugs (TCD) Pharma - University of Birmingham - University of Bologna - University of California - University of Chicago - University of Florida - University of Hong Kong - University of Kentucky - University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center - University of Miami - University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine - University of Michigan - University of Pennsylvania - University of Texas Health Science Center - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center - US Venture Partners - UT Horizon Fund - Venrock - vTv Therapeutics - Wake Forest University - Weill Cornell Medical College - Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati - Windhover Information - Ziarco Group For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5hg7l9/cancer_metabolism


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, May 29, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics, 2017-2030" report to their offering. Cancer metabolism is based on the principle that cancer cells, as compared to normal cells, have different metabolic activities in order to support their enhanced energy and anabolic requirements. The pioneering discovery by Otto Warburg in the middle of the 20th century led to the observation that metabolic activity in tumor tissues leads to a ten-fold increase in production of lactate (from glucose) under aerobic conditions. This revelation generated a significant interest and led industry stakeholders to target metabolic pathways in an effort to find the treatment of cancer. In addition, several academic players have also initiated studies to explore the functional consequences of alterations in various metabolic pathways. The idea behind therapeutic strategies that target cancer metabolism is to limit/modulate the supply of crucial nutrients in cancer cells in order to induce cell death. Over the years, experimental and conceptual advances in this field have resulted in a better understanding of the role of metabolic pathways for the treatment of cancer. Owing to the complex nature of these pathways, innovation in this domain has been gradual. However, the knowledge that metabolic adaptations in cancer cells promote their malignant properties has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment; selective inhibition of altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells is believed to be a highly promising approach. Currently, there are several molecules that are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. Extensive research is currently being carried out to explore the potential of certain enzymes of metabolic pathways to act as targets for the treatment of cancer. The alterations in metabolic pathways in cancer cells are often mediated by mutations in oncogenes and cell signaling pathways. However, with the recognition of specific enzymes within each metabolic pathway, it is anticipated that drugs targeting these enzymes are likely to have high efficacy in treating cancer with minimal side-effects. The "Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market, 2017-2030" report provides an extensive study on the current landscape of the emerging pipeline of novel drugs that target metabolic pathways in cancer cells and offers a comprehensive discussion on the likely future potential. Despite the fact that the field of cancer metabolism therapeutics is still in early stages, there are many active players in this area. A larger proportion of players (on the basis of number of molecules) are small-sized and start-up companies. In fact, well-known big pharma companies have come together with smaller players to support discovery and development of such therapies. Our research indicates that there are several players with mid/late-stage clinical candidates that are likely to enter the market in the coming decade; examples include Agios Pharmaceuticals, Celgene, Polaris Group, Bio-Cancer Treatment International, BERG Health, Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Taiho Pharmaceutical, Novartis and 3-V Biosciences. The primary focus is on drugs that lead to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells by altering/inhibiting the activity of key enzymes/transporters that are a part of glucose metabolism, amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, lipid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. The scope includes novel products that are being specifically developed to target altered metabolic pathways and key enzymes/amino acids involved in the metabolism of cancer cells. Examples of such enzymes/amino acids include isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant (IDH 1), arginine, glutamine, MTH1, L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB3), choline kinase (ChoK), glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and hexokinase II. Specifically, certain drugs based on amino acid metabolism are being developed under the class of immuno-oncology drugs; these have been excluded from the scope of this document. The overall pipeline comprises of 48 molecules that are under development for the treatment of a variety of oncological indications. Of these, 20 molecules are undergoing clinical evaluation while others (28) are in discovery/preclinical stages. This unexploited and promising market has its hopes pinned on multiple start-ups and small-sized companies, which have received significant financial support from strategic investors and venture capital firms in the recent past. One of the key objectives of this report was to understand the current activity and the future potential of the market. The study provides a detailed market forecast and opportunity analysis from 2017 to 2030. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report are backed by a detailed understanding of the therapies targeting cancer metabolism and other targets closely associated with them. To account for uncertaintiesassociated with the development of novel therapeutics and add robustness to our model, we have provided three scenarios for our market forecast, namely the conservative, base and optimistic scenarios. All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and from primary research. All financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified. Key Topics Covered: 1. PREFACE 1.1. Scope of the Report 1.2. Research Methodology 1.3. Chapter Outlines 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3. INTRODUCTION 3.1. Chapter Overview 3.2. Cellular Metabolism: An Introduction 3.3. Cancer Cell Metabolism: An Introduction 3.4. Cancer Cell Metabolism: History and Evolution 3.5. Altered Metabolic Pathways in Cancer Cells 3.5.1. Glucose Metabolism 3.5.2. TCA Cycle 3.5.3. Amino Acid Metabolism 3.5.4. Nucleotide Metabolism 3.5.5. Pentose Phosphate Pathway 3.5.6. Lipid Metabolism 3.6. Challenges Associated with Targeting Metabolic Pathways 3.7. Targeting Altered Metabolic Pathways for Cancer Treatment 4. MARKET OVERVIEW 4.1. Chapter Overview 4.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Clinical Pipeline 4.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Preclinical Pipeline 4.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Phase of Development 4.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Targeted Metabolic Pathway 4.6. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Target 4.7. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Type of Molecule 4.8. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area 4.9. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Indication 4.10. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Route of Administration 4.11. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Key Players 4.12. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution by Headquarters of Developers 4.13. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Role of Non-Industry Players 5. DRUG PROFILES 5.1. Chapter Overview 5.2. Enasidenib/AG-221 (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 5.2.1. Overview 5.2.2. Mechanism of Action 5.2.3. Current Status of Development 5.2.4. Clinical Studies 5.2.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.2.6. Agios Pharmaceuticals 5.3. Ivosidenib/AG-120 (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 5.3.1. Overview 5.3.2. Mechanism of Action 5.3.3. Current Status of Development 5.3.4. Clinical Studies 5.3.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.3.6. Agios Pharmaceuticals 5.4. ADI-PEG 20 (Polaris Group) 5.4.1. Overview 5.4.2. Mechanism of Action 5.4.3. Current Status of Development 5.4.4. Clinical Studies 5.4.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.4.6. Polaris Group 5.5. BCT-100 (Bio-Cancer Treatment International) 5.5.1. Overview 5.5.2. Mechanism of Action 5.5.3. Current Status of Development 5.5.4. Clinical Studies 5.5.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.5.6. Bio-Cancer Treatment International 5.6. BPM 31510 (BERG Health) 5.6.1. Overview 5.6.2. Mechanism of Action 5.6.3. Current Status of Development 5.6.4. Clinical Studies 5.6.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.6.5.1. Preclinical Data 5.6.5.2. Clinical Data 5.6.6. BERG Health 5.6.6.1. Overview 5.6.6.2. Technology Platform: Interrogative Biology® 5.6.6.3. Future Outlook 5.7. CPI-613 (Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals) 5.7.1. Overview 5.7.2. Mechanism of Action 5.7.3. Current Status of Development 5.7.4. Clinical Studies 5.7.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.7.6. Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals 5.8. TAS-114 (Taiho Pharmaceutical) 5.8.1. Overview 5.8.2. Mechanism of Action 5.8.3. Current Status of Development 5.8.4. Clinical Studies 5.8.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.8.6. Taiho Pharmaceutical 5.9. IDH305 (Novartis) 5.9.1. Overview 5.9.2. Mechanism of Action 5.9.3. Current Status of Development 5.9.4. Clinical Studies 5.9.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.9.6. Novartis 5.10. TVB 2640 (3-V Biosciences) 5.10.1. Overview 5.10.2. Mechanism of Action 5.10.3. Current Status of Development 5.10.4. Clinical Studies 5.10.5. Preclinical/Clinical Findings 5.10.6. 3-V Biosciences 6. MARKET FORECAST AND OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS 6.1. Chapter Overview 6.2. Scope and Limitations 6.3. Forecast Methodology 6.4. Overall Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market (USD Million) 6.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics Market: Individual Drug Forecasts (USD Million) 6.5.1. Enasidenib (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.2. Ivosidenib (Agios Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.3. ADI-PEG 20 (Polaris Group) 6.5.4. BPM 31510 (BERG Health) 6.5.5. CPI-613 (Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals) 6.5.6. BCT-100 (Bio-Cancer Treatment International) 6.5.7. IDH305 (Novartis) 6.5.8. TAS-114 (Taiho Pharmaceutical) 6.5.9. TBV-2640 (3-V Biosciences) 7. VENTURE CAPITAL INTEREST 7.1. Chapter Overview 7.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: List of Funding Instances 7.2.1. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Cumulative Number of Investments by Year, Pre 2010-2017 7.2.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Cumulative Amount Invested by Year, Pre 2010-2017 (USD Million) 7.2.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Distribution of Funding Instances by Type of Funding 7.2.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Funding Instances, Most Active Industry Players 7.2.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Funding Instances, Most Active Venture Capital Firms/Investors 8. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS 8.1. Chapter Overview 8.2. Partnership Models 8.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Recent Partnerships 9. KEY INSIGHTS 9.1. Chapter Overview 9.2. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Developer Landscape 9.3. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Targeted Metabolic Pathway, Phase of Development and Type of Molecule 9.4. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Geographical Presence of Companies 9.5. Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics: Pipeline Analysis by Popularity of Metabolic Enzymes/Targets 10. CONCLUSION 10.1. Growing Understanding of Tumor Associated Metabolic Alterations has Advanced the Field of Cancer Metabolism 10.2. Commercialization of Late-Stage Drugs and Advancement of Discovery/Preclinical Candidates in the Near Future is Likely to Sustain the Momentum 10.3. Amongst Various Metabolic Pathways, Amino Acid Metabolism and Glucose Metabolism Have Been Most Widely Researched 10.4. Small Pharmaceutical Companies are Emerging as Key Players; Research is Heavily Concentrated in the US and Parts of Europe 10.5. Growing Partnerships and Venture Capital Support are Indicative of Lucrative Future Potential 10.6. Once Approved, Cancer Metabolism Based Therapeutics are Poised to Achieve an Accelerated Growth 11. INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS 11.1. Chapter Overview 11.2. Raul Mostoslavsky, Associate Professor, Medicine, Harvard Medical School 11.3. Magdalena Marciniak, Business Alliance Manager, Selvita S.A. 12. APPENDIX 1: TABULATED DATA 13. APPENDIX 2: LIST OF COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS Companies Mentioned - 2M Companies - 3-V Biosciences - Abbott - Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure - Adage Capital Partners - Ade Capital Sodical SCR - Admune Therapeutics - Advanced Cancer Therapeutics - Advanced Technology Ventures - Aeglea BioTherapeutics - Agios Pharmaceuticals - Aju Tech - Alexandria Venture Investments - Ally Bridge Group - Althea Partners - American Association for Cancer Research - American Society for Radiation Oncology - American Society of Clinical Oncology - American Society of Hematology - ARCH Venture Partners - Arkin Holdings - Astellas Venture Management - AstraZeneca - Atlas Venture - Barts Cancer Institute - Bayer - Becton Dickinson - BERG Health - BIND Therapeutics - Bio-Cancer Treatment International - BioMed X - Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund - Boston College - Bristol Myers Squibb - Calithera Biosciences - Cancer Research Technology - Cancer Research UK - Celgene - Chinese University of Hong Kong - Ciba-Geigy - Clave Mayor - Cloud Pharmaceuticals - Commonwealth Capital Ventures - Conegliano Ventures - Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals - Cowen Group - CRB Inverbio - Daiichi Sankyo - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute - Delphi Ventures - DesigneRx Pharmaceuticals - Emory University - Encore Vision - European Hematology Association - European Medicines Agency - European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer - European Society of Medical Oncology - Flagship Ventures - Food and Drug Administration - FORMA Therapeutics - Foundation Medicine - Genentech - German Cancer Research Center - Gilead Sciences - GNTech - Grifols - Harvard Medical School - Hong Kong Department of Health - Horizon Discovery - IDT Corporation - ImmunoMet Therapeutics - Informa - International Mesothelioma Interest Group - IOmet Pharma - J Pharma - Janssen Biotech - Jennison Associates - Kancera - Kantar Health - Karolinska Institutet - KBI Biopharma - Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation - Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers - Kyushu University - Lightstone Ventures - Lilly Ventures - Lo Ka Chung Centre for Natural Anti-Cancer Drug Development - Longwood Fund - Louisiana State University - Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research - Mary Crowley Cancer Research Centers - Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center - MD Anderson Cancer Center - Medical University of Vienna - Medidata Solutions - Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - Merck KGaA - Metabomed - MetaVest - Mirae Asset Venture Investment - Mission Bay Capital - Moleculin - Morgenthaler Ventures - MPM Capital - MS Ventures - National Cancer Institute - National Institutes of Health - New Enterprise Associates - New Medical Enzymes - New York University School of Medicine - Nimbus Therapeutics - Northwestern University - Novartis - Novartis Venture Fund - Novo - Ohio State University - Oncotherapeutics - OrbiMed - Ostuka Holdings - Partikula - Partners Innovation Fund - Pfizer - Polaris Group - Polaris Pharmaceuticals - Pontifax - Princeton University - Queen Mary Hospital - Quintiles - RA Capital Management - Raze Therapeutics - Rgenix - Rock Springs Capital - Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University - Sandoz - Selexys Pharmaceuticals - Selvita - Sofinnova Partners - Spinifex Pharmaceuticals - Sprint Bioscience - Stand Up To Cancer - Stanford University - Stanford University School of Medicine - Stockholm University - Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center - Taiho Oncology - Taiho Pharmaceutical - Taiho Ventures - TAVARGENIX - TDW Group - TDW Pharmaceuticals - Technion Research & Development Foundation - Telix Pharmaceuticals - The Abramson Family Foundation - The Chetrit Group - The Column Group - The Francis Crick Institute - The Hong Kong Polytechnic University - Therapeia - Third Rock Ventures - TPP Global Development - Translational Cancer Drugs (TCD) Pharma - University of Birmingham - University of Bologna - University of California - University of Chicago - University of Florida - University of Hong Kong - University of Kentucky - University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center - University of Miami - University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine - University of Michigan - University of Pennsylvania - University of Texas Health Science Center - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center - US Venture Partners - UT Horizon Fund - Venrock - vTv Therapeutics - Wake Forest University - Weill Cornell Medical College - Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati - Windhover Information - Ziarco Group For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5hg7l9/cancer_metabolism

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