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Darmstadt, Germany

Kirschke S.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Volker J.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Richter S.,SYDRO Consult GmbH
Environmental Earth Sciences | Year: 2016

Management processes play an important role in helping to achieve the European Water Framework Directive (WFD)’s water quality goals. As a result, researchers have suggested numerous indicators to evaluate the relevant management processes, including indicators that are both generally applicable and highly context-specific. However, these indicators have not until now been summarized and systematized within one comprehensive framework. Consequently, researchers have experienced difficulties in evaluating the relative influence of different indicators on the WFD implementation process. This paper aims to contribute to combatting this problem by developing and applying an open framework of management indicators to evaluate the WFD’s management processes in Germany. On a conceptual level, this paper develops the basic design principles of the framework and collects around 40 management indicators in a structured way, based on an analysis of the literature related to water management. On an empirical level, this paper provides guidelines on, and specific examples of the ways in which this framework can be applied in practice, based on reports on the implementation process and data from the German reporting system WasserBLIcK. Results show that the framework is useful for systematically analysing the implementation processes of the WFD in Germany. To increase the value of the framework, the authors invite further research to facilitate the framework’s continual update and its application in the ongoing implementation processes of the WFD in Germany. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Wagner A.,RWE AG | Koenzen U.,Planungsburo Koenzen Wasser Landschaft | Lohr H.,SYDRO Consult GmbH | Hemmann R.,Bezirksregierung Cologne | And 2 more authors.
WasserWirtschaft | Year: 2013

The Inden opencast lignite mine is located some 20 km to the north-east of Aachen in Germany's Rhineland. After the end of lignite mining around the year 2030, a lake measuring some 11.8 km2 is planned to be created. It will mainly be filled with water from the river Rur flowing past in the immediate vicinity of the opencast mine. Filling the lake volume of some 800 million m3 will take 20 to 25 years. During the past ten years, the basic water management questions arising in connection with the creation of the Inden mine's residual lake were settled within the scope of the state-planning approval procedure. It could be demonstrated by means of a numeric river catchment model that the envisaged withdrawal of water from the Rur is feasible and compatible with the water body's ecological and hydromorphological targets as well as its industrial use. Source


Slavik I.,TU Dresden | Uhl W.,TU Dresden | Volker J.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Lohr H.,SYDRO Consult GmbH | And 3 more authors.
Water Science and Technology: Water Supply | Year: 2010

Dammed water reservoirs for drinking water production with their catchment areas and rivers downstream represent dynamic systems that change constantly and are subject to many influences. An optimized management considering and weighing up the various demands on raw water reservoirs (long-term storage for drinking water supply, flood control, ecological state of the rivers downstream, energy production, nature conservation and recreational uses) against each other is therefore very difficult. Thus, an optimal reservoir management has to take into account scenarios of possibly occurring external influences and to permit predictions of prospective raw water qualities, respectively. Furthermore, the impact of short and long term changes in raw water quality on subordinate processes should be considered. This approach was followed in the work presented here, as there currently is no tool available to predict and evaluate the impacts of raw water reservoir management strategies integratively. The strategy supported by the newly developed decision support procedure takes into account all aspects from water quality, flood control and drinking water treatment to environmental quality downstream the reservoir. Furthermore, possible extreme events or changes of boundary conditions (e.g. climate change) can be considered. © IWA Publishing 2010. Source


Slavik I.,TU Dresden | Uhl W.,TU Dresden | Skibinski B.,TU Dresden | Rolinski S.,Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research | And 8 more authors.
Water Science and Technology: Water Supply | Year: 2013

Dammed drinking water reservoirs with their catchment areas and the downstream rivers are dynamic systems that change permanently under the influence of many factors. Their multifunctional use for drinking water supply, flood control, energy production, nature conservation and recreation as well as ecological constraints for the rivers downstream requires an integrative management considering and balancing between different requirements. Thus, an optimal reservoir management has to take into account scenarios of external influences and must be based on predictions of prospective raw water qualities. Furthermore, the impacts of short- and long-term changes of the raw water quality on drinking water treatment have to be considered. The problem is very complex and cannot be solved intuitively but requires the application of hydrological, ecological and process models. This approach was followed in the work presented here, as a tool to predict and evaluate the impacts of different reservoir management strategies in an integrative way is currently not available. The developed decision support procedure (DSP) allows for the estimation of the effects of different hydrological and water quantity management scenarios on raw water quality, water processing costs and ecology in the downstream river. Extreme hydrological events or changing boundary conditions (e.g. climate change) are taken into account. © IWA Publishing 2013. Source


Lange J.,Wasserverband Eifel Rur | Lohr H.,SYDRO Consult GmbH | Polczyk H.,Wasserverband Eifel Rur
WasserWirtschaft | Year: 2010

The operation rules of the reservoir Olef have been adopted in order to integrate water quantity and quality management. A dynamically adjustable rule for flood control in combination with a quantity-quality based operation to preserve the Hypolimnion were established. The stratification of the water body in the reservoir Is calculated during May to September. If the Hypolimnion drops under a defined level, the discharge downstream is reduced to minimal tolerable values. The repeatedly calculation of the hypolimnion gives information of time and duration of the reduced discharge. As a result an increase of the 10 °C isotherm could be achieved. The operation time of the turbines decreased 11 % but power was reduced only with 4 %. Lower discharge during the summer stagnation is compensated to a certain level In winter and spring. The programme TALSIM is applied in the real-time operation at the reservoir. Source

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