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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release The science of elite human performance is evolving at a rapid pace as researchers tap into data from the human body to reveal the complex roles of sleep, nutrition, genetics, training, and neuroscience in the performance of the world’s top athletes. During the 2017 International Human Performance Summit July 15-16 – hosted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio – professional and collegiate sports representatives will join elite military units to learn how to apply cutting-edge research that drives higher levels of human performance. “A conference to discuss applications for the frontiers of research is long overdue,” said Kase Saylor, co-lead of SwRI’s Human Performance Initiative (HPI). “This is a unique opportunity to pick the brains of some of the smartest people in the fields of sports science, recovery, conditioning, and cognition.” Keynote speaker Dr. Andy Walshe, Director of High Performance, Red Bull, will discuss how athletes from extreme sports are inspiring other sports to push boundaries. Other distinguished researchers providing detailed talks followed by Q&A include: Attendees will get 4.75 continuing education units (CEUs) from the CSCCa (Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches Association). “This is a great opportunity to engage with cutting-edge researchers in an intimate, small-group setting in beautiful and historic San Antonio, while earning CSCCa credits,” added Dr. Dan Nicolella, an SwRI researcher who specializes in biomechanics. Registration is $375 through May 19. Rates change to $475 (May 15-31), $575 (June 1-30), and $675 (July 1-15). Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks in the Hilton Palacio del Rio hotel located on the scenic San Antonio River Walk. For more information, register at 2017IHPS.swri.org or contact Kimberly Pritchard at 210-522-3930. Download the event flyer to learn about advance registration discounts. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fd35dad5-67fe-4bb7-b24a-1f36e36d381a


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release The science of elite human performance is evolving at a rapid pace as researchers tap into data from the human body to reveal the complex roles of sleep, nutrition, genetics, training, and neuroscience in the performance of the world’s top athletes. During the 2017 International Human Performance Summit July 15-16 – hosted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio – professional and collegiate sports representatives will join elite military units to learn how to apply cutting-edge research that drives higher levels of human performance. “A conference to discuss applications for the frontiers of research is long overdue,” said Kase Saylor, co-lead of SwRI’s Human Performance Initiative (HPI). “This is a unique opportunity to pick the brains of some of the smartest people in the fields of sports science, recovery, conditioning, and cognition.” Keynote speaker Dr. Andy Walshe, Director of High Performance, Red Bull, will discuss how athletes from extreme sports are inspiring other sports to push boundaries. Other distinguished researchers providing detailed talks followed by Q&A include: Attendees will get 4.75 continuing education units (CEUs) from the CSCCa (Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches Association). “This is a great opportunity to engage with cutting-edge researchers in an intimate, small-group setting in beautiful and historic San Antonio, while earning CSCCa credits,” added Dr. Dan Nicolella, an SwRI researcher who specializes in biomechanics. Registration is $375 through May 19. Rates change to $475 (May 15-31), $575 (June 1-30), and $675 (July 1-15). Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks in the Hilton Palacio del Rio hotel located on the scenic San Antonio River Walk. For more information, register at 2017IHPS.swri.org or contact Kimberly Pritchard at 210-522-3930. Download the event flyer to learn about advance registration discounts. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fd35dad5-67fe-4bb7-b24a-1f36e36d381a


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release The science of elite human performance is evolving at a rapid pace as researchers tap into data from the human body to reveal the complex roles of sleep, nutrition, genetics, training, and neuroscience in the performance of the world’s top athletes. During the 2017 International Human Performance Summit July 15-16 – hosted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio – professional and collegiate sports representatives will join elite military units to learn how to apply cutting-edge research that drives higher levels of human performance. “A conference to discuss applications for the frontiers of research is long overdue,” said Kase Saylor, co-lead of SwRI’s Human Performance Initiative (HPI). “This is a unique opportunity to pick the brains of some of the smartest people in the fields of sports science, recovery, conditioning, and cognition.” Keynote speaker Dr. Andy Walshe, Director of High Performance, Red Bull, will discuss how athletes from extreme sports are inspiring other sports to push boundaries. Other distinguished researchers providing detailed talks followed by Q&A include: Attendees will get 4.75 continuing education units (CEUs) from the CSCCa (Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches Association). “This is a great opportunity to engage with cutting-edge researchers in an intimate, small-group setting in beautiful and historic San Antonio, while earning CSCCa credits,” added Dr. Dan Nicolella, an SwRI researcher who specializes in biomechanics. Registration is $375 through May 19. Rates change to $475 (May 15-31), $575 (June 1-30), and $675 (July 1-15). Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks in the Hilton Palacio del Rio hotel located on the scenic San Antonio River Walk. For more information, register at 2017IHPS.swri.org or contact Kimberly Pritchard at 210-522-3930. Download the event flyer to learn about advance registration discounts. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fd35dad5-67fe-4bb7-b24a-1f36e36d381a


News Article | June 14, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) patented a new technology to inspect coatings of pipelines installed through horizontal directional drilling (HDD), a trenchless technology that has gained widespread acceptance over the past 20 years. The technology can determine both the extent and the configuration of any damage to the coating that occurs during HDD installation. “Our system provides a significant improvement over existing technologies that are only capable of estimating the extent of coating damage but do not provide information about the configuration of that damage,” said Dr. Pavan Shukla, one of the two SwRI engineers who invented the technology. Traditionally, workers install pipelines in open trenches, a method that disturbs roads, sidewalks, and environmentally sensitive areas. With this installation method, coating damage is more easily detected using various conventional techniques from the surface above the pipeline. HDD is used for pipelines that run under surface features, such as rivers, roadways, and railways, where trenching is not desirable or practical. Special methods and devices to detect coating damage and corrosion of HDD-installed pipelines are necessary because access to the surface above the pipeline is limited. Additionally, the HDD installation itself tends to damage coatings as pipeline segments are pulled through a borehole and contact soil, rock and other debris. The SwRI-patented technology can determine damage to the coating along both the length and around the circumference of the pipeline. Additional field testing is needed before the technology can be licensed for commercial use. SwRI’s “Detection of Coating Defects on Buried Pipelines Using Magnetic Field Variations within the Pipeline” (Patent No. 9,638,667) technology inspects pipeline segments for coating damage immediately after HDD installation. With this technology, engineers place a magnetic field sensor array within the pipeline. The sensor array generally matches the interior profile of the pipeline but is smaller. As the array moves along the pipeline, engineers analyze the output from each sensor to determine location, configuration, and the extent of coating damage. “It is important to determine the condition of the coating on the pipeline segment immediately after installation,” added Dr. Jay Fisher, the co-inventor of the technology. “Understanding the extent of any damage to the coating will help determine if it is too severe to be protected by a cathodic protection system, which inhibits the oxidation process and prevents corrosion, or whether it can be repaired or needs to be replaced before it is placed into service.” SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0813b488-aa8c-4850-929c-62550a9f04df


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Between our physical exploration of the extremes of Earth's geography and environment, the solar system, and our great astronomical devices, humans have become used to a certain intimacy with the near and far universe. But it's not always easy to pinpoint what you're looking at when pictures are shown out of context. Here's a brief challenge for you: Can you identify the following images? If so you've definitely earned your cosmic merit badge. [Answers and image credits are at the end of this post] (1) Large (over 150 micron) Martian sand-grains after sifting by the Curiosity rover. Image about an inch square. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS. (2) Part of a solar filament (dark) breaking away from the Sun in 2015, seen in extreme ultraviolet light where the filament plasma appears cooler and darker. Spotted by the SOHO's C2 coronograph. Credit: NASA/SOHO. (3) Part of the image of a distant galaxy being gravitationally lensed by a foreground massive galaxy, image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/STScI/ESA. (4) The Tartarus Dorsa mountains on Pluto, view less than 100 miles across. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI/New Horizons. (5) The Jovian moon Io - a closeup of one small region on Io's volcanically active surface (over 400 active regions at any given time) taken by the Galileo probe. Credit: NASA / JPL / University of Arizona. (6) Closeup of a cross-section of a meteorite with olivine crystal inclusions (yellow) in a nickel-iron alloy - a centimeter or so across. Credit: J. Debosscher, KU Leuven. (7) A living landscape - the surface of a Purple-striped jellyfish (you can see the original here). Credit: Sanjay Acharya, and Monterey Aquarium/Creative Commons.


Morbidelli A.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Nesvorny D.,SwRI
Astronomy and Astrophysics | Year: 2012

Context. Understanding the growth of the cores of giant planets is a difficult problem. Recently, Lambrechts & Johansen (2012, A&A, 544, A32, LJ12) proposed a new model in which the cores grow by the accretion of pebble-size objects, as the latter drift towards the star due to gas drag. Aims. We investigate the dynamics of pebble-size objects in the vicinity of planetary embryos of 1 and 5 Earth masses and the resulting accretion rates. Methods. We use hydrodynamical simulations, in which the embryo influences the dynamics of the gas and the pebbles suffer gas drag according to the local gas density and velocities. Results. The pebble dynamics in the vicinity of the planetary embryo is non-trivial, and it changes significantly with the pebble size. Nevertheless, the accretion rate of the embryo that we measure is within an order of magnitude of the rate estimated in LJ12 and tends to their value with increasing pebble-size. Conclusions. The model by LJ12 has the potential to explain the rapid growth of giant planet cores. The actual accretion rates however, depend on the surface density of pebble size objects in the disk, which is unknown to date. ©2012 ESO.


News Article | September 14, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« UK’s APC awards Dearman-led consortium £6M for development of Dearman Engine; clean, cold power | Main | GM commits to 100% renewable energy by 2050 » In a milestone for the low-carbon fuel project, LanzaTech has produced 1,500 gallons of jet fuel from waste industrial gases from steel mills via a fermentation process for Virgin Atlantic. Virgin Atlantic and LanzaTech have been working together on the project since 2011. HSBC joined the partnership in 2014. The “Lanzanol” was produced in China at the RSB (Roundtable of Sustainable Biomaterials) certified Shougang demonstration facility. The innovative alcohol-to-jet (ATJ) process was developed in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and with the help of funding from HSBC. LanzaTech and Virgin Atlantic are now set to continue to work with Boeing and industry colleagues to complete the additional testing aircraft and engine manufacturers require before approving the fuel for first use in a commercial aircraft. Assuming all initial approvals are achieved, the innovative LanzaTech jet fuel could be used in a first of its kind proving flight in 2017. Following a successful proving flight, the data collected will enable the partnership to seek approval to use the fuel on routine commercial flights. This would also help pave the way for LanzaTech to fund and build their first commercial jet fuel plant to supply fuel to Virgin Atlantic and other airlines. As a UK-based partnership, it is hoped the first LanzaTech jet fuel plant would be based in the UK. The process. Steel production produces waste carbon monoxide (CO) gas, which is frequently flared (burnt off) to the atmosphere as greenhouse gas CO2 (or sometimes used less efficiently for other purposes). LanzaTech captures the waste gas from refineries and manufacturing plants and feeds the CO-rich gas to microbes that consume the gas and produce ethanol. During the second stage of the process, the ethanol is run through a PNNL-developed catalyst that converts ethanol to jet fuel by removing the oxygen and combining hydrocarbons, a process known as dehydration-oligomerization. The catalyst first removes water from the ethanol (dehydration), leaving behind ethylene. The small ethylene hydrocarbons are then combined (oligomerization) to form hydrocarbon chains large enough for jet fuel without forming aromatics that lead to sooting when burned. The fuel meets all the specifications required for use in commercial aviation Each gallon of ethanol is converted to produce ½gallon of aviation fuel. The process could be used to capture and recycle around ⅓ of the carbon that steel facilities would otherwise release into the atmosphere. Worldwide, around 1.7 billion metric tonnes of steel are produced every year; LanzaTech estimates that its process could be retrofitted to 65% of the world’s steel mills. This offers the potential to produce 30 billion gallons of ethanol worldwide, for around 15 billion gallons of jet fuel p.a. This would represent just under 19% of all aviation fuel currently used worldwide p.a. (80 billion gallon total world aviation fuel use). We can now truly imagine a world where a steel mill can not only produce the steel for the components of the plane but also recycle its gases to produce the fuel that powers the aircraft. This program illustrates that such breakthroughs are only possible through collaboration. In this case, it is governments (US DOE, FAA, DARPA), laboratories (PNNL, AFRL, SWRI, MTU, UDRI), NGOs (RSB) and industry (Virgin, HSBC, Boeing, Shougang, Airlines for America) coming together to disrupt our current global carbon trajectory. We look forward to working with colleagues past, present and future to make this pioneering new fuel a commercial reality.

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