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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release The science of elite human performance is evolving at a rapid pace as researchers tap into data from the human body to reveal the complex roles of sleep, nutrition, genetics, training, and neuroscience in the performance of the world’s top athletes. During the 2017 International Human Performance Summit July 15-16 – hosted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio – professional and collegiate sports representatives will join elite military units to learn how to apply cutting-edge research that drives higher levels of human performance. “A conference to discuss applications for the frontiers of research is long overdue,” said Kase Saylor, co-lead of SwRI’s Human Performance Initiative (HPI). “This is a unique opportunity to pick the brains of some of the smartest people in the fields of sports science, recovery, conditioning, and cognition.” Keynote speaker Dr. Andy Walshe, Director of High Performance, Red Bull, will discuss how athletes from extreme sports are inspiring other sports to push boundaries. Other distinguished researchers providing detailed talks followed by Q&A include: Attendees will get 4.75 continuing education units (CEUs) from the CSCCa (Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches Association). “This is a great opportunity to engage with cutting-edge researchers in an intimate, small-group setting in beautiful and historic San Antonio, while earning CSCCa credits,” added Dr. Dan Nicolella, an SwRI researcher who specializes in biomechanics. Registration is $375 through May 19. Rates change to $475 (May 15-31), $575 (June 1-30), and $675 (July 1-15). Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks in the Hilton Palacio del Rio hotel located on the scenic San Antonio River Walk. For more information, register at 2017IHPS.swri.org or contact Kimberly Pritchard at 210-522-3930. Download the event flyer to learn about advance registration discounts. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fd35dad5-67fe-4bb7-b24a-1f36e36d381a


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release The science of elite human performance is evolving at a rapid pace as researchers tap into data from the human body to reveal the complex roles of sleep, nutrition, genetics, training, and neuroscience in the performance of the world’s top athletes. During the 2017 International Human Performance Summit July 15-16 – hosted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio – professional and collegiate sports representatives will join elite military units to learn how to apply cutting-edge research that drives higher levels of human performance. “A conference to discuss applications for the frontiers of research is long overdue,” said Kase Saylor, co-lead of SwRI’s Human Performance Initiative (HPI). “This is a unique opportunity to pick the brains of some of the smartest people in the fields of sports science, recovery, conditioning, and cognition.” Keynote speaker Dr. Andy Walshe, Director of High Performance, Red Bull, will discuss how athletes from extreme sports are inspiring other sports to push boundaries. Other distinguished researchers providing detailed talks followed by Q&A include: Attendees will get 4.75 continuing education units (CEUs) from the CSCCa (Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches Association). “This is a great opportunity to engage with cutting-edge researchers in an intimate, small-group setting in beautiful and historic San Antonio, while earning CSCCa credits,” added Dr. Dan Nicolella, an SwRI researcher who specializes in biomechanics. Registration is $375 through May 19. Rates change to $475 (May 15-31), $575 (June 1-30), and $675 (July 1-15). Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks in the Hilton Palacio del Rio hotel located on the scenic San Antonio River Walk. For more information, register at 2017IHPS.swri.org or contact Kimberly Pritchard at 210-522-3930. Download the event flyer to learn about advance registration discounts. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fd35dad5-67fe-4bb7-b24a-1f36e36d381a


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

San Antonio, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For immediate release Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has tapped has tapped into mobile communications technology to turbocharge its custom Rhodium Drug Development System. Rhodium, SwRI’s proprietary docking simulation program for biostructure-based drug design, has improved its processing capabilities up to four times faster thanks to a new SwRI-designed and optimized “super computer” that uses the same technology found in mobile communications to enable faster streaming. “Even before the integration of cell phone technology, the Rhodium software program represented a significant improvement in drug discovery by automatically searching the complete 3-D structure of a protein,” said Dr. Jonathan Bohmann, a principal scientist in SwRI’s Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division. “Our clients are very excited about the advantages the increased processing power offers.” When designing a new drug, researchers must understand how a drug or series of similar compounds (known as ligands) will bind with, or inhibit, proteins. SwRI’s Rhodium software prescreens the three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzymes, accelerating pharmaceutical and biochemical research prior to drug development. Even with Rhodium’s rapid turnaround time, clients needed even faster processing capabilities. Mobile technology is designed to be power efficient. Integrating this technology, SwRI designed and optimized a super computer about the size of a filing cabinet. The unit is secured, ensuring client information remains protected. “A lot of processing power fits in this compact package,” Bohmann said. “With no external connection the processing happens right here at SwRI, keeping our clients’ information secure. Rhodium is powerful, streaming fast, secure, and efficient.” After undergoing pilot acceptance tests in early 2017, the processing system is now fully activated. “The processing results are four times faster than the previous generation,” Bohmann said. “The supercomputer unit is modular and more components can be added as needed to increase processing capacity.” Rhodium can be used to develop and screen a range of drugs from antibiotics to treatments for diseases from cancer to Alzheimer’s as well as vaccines. The software also predicts adverse drug reactions and side effects. Recently Rhodium was a topmost performer in a community-wide blind docking challenge for predicting drug potency hosted by the Drug Design Data Resource. To learn more about SwRI, see microencapsulation.swri.org or visit Booth No. 1341 at INFORMEX. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/82c6a5e3-b63a-4c47-86b2-42823c280979


News Article | August 3, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dr. Simone Marchi, a senior research scientist in the Space Science and Engineering Division of Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), has been selected to receive the Farinella Prize for his research on the impact history and evolution of the inner solar system. The prize honors the memory of Paolo Farinella (1953–2000), an Italian planetary scientist who made significant contributions in the fields of asteroids and small bodies. The distinction recognizes young scientists working in Farinella’s fields of interest — including physics, planetary science, space geodesy and space popularization — and emphasizes the interdisciplinary research and international collaboration that were a hallmark of Farinella’s work. This year’s award specifically recognizes outstanding contributions to the study of the physics and dynamics of the inner planets of the solar system and their satellites. Marchi’s research interests are in the formation of the terrestrial planets and the Moon, the geology of asteroids and the terrestrial planets, spectroscopy and dynamics of minor bodies, and meteorites. His most recent work has focused on the dwarf planet Ceres and the earliest collision history of the Earth and Moon. “The contributions Simone has made to space science at such a relatively young age are truly remarkable,” said SwRI Associate Vice President Dr. Robin Canup. “His outstanding research contributions, in combination with the interdisciplinary nature of his work and his tremendous leadership skills in developing successful collaborations, make him an ideal recipient for this award. We are very proud of him and his many achievements and look forward to seeing what his future research will reveal about the mysteries of the solar system.” Marchi will receive the award at a ceremony in September during the international European Planetary Science Congress 2017 in Riga, Latvia. The Farinella Prize is supported by several Italian institutions, including the University of Pisa, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), and the “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR). Marchi holds a degree in physics from Pisa University and a doctorate in applied physics from Pisa University. Farinella, one of his master thesis advisors, served as an inspiring and influential figure for him. Marchi has authored or co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and holds memberships in the American Geophysical Union, American Astronomical Society (Division for Planetary Sciences), and the International Astronomical Union. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/d1efa600-2c6c-4f2a-9347-6f9e517d2b61


News Article | July 12, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dr. Ron Green, an institute scientist at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), has been elected chairman of the board of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI). This nonprofit, government-supported organization conducts, facilitates, and promotes programs in cave and karst research, education, environmental management, and data acquisition and sharing. “NCKRI fosters interdisciplinary cooperation in cave and karst research,” Green said. Karst is partially dissolved limestone rock that creates complex underground aquifers characterized by sinkholes, ravines, and other surface features. “Of particular interest to me is the role the organization plays in protecting the environment for the benefit of cave and karst landforms while developing environmentally sound and sustainable resource management practices.” Green is a groundwater hydrologist with research experience in groundwater resource assessment, multiphase and groundwater modeling, laboratory and field experiments, and environmental geophysics. He has served as the principal lead for karst hydrology investigations, including investigating hydraulic interactions in groundwater systems and modeling groundwater flow through karst aquifers. He was a principal investigator for an SwRI-funded project to design, build, and deploy a neutrally buoyant sensor to remotely map the pathway and morphology of karst conduits and measure the velocity of groundwater flow in them. The invention earned an R&D 100 Award, recognizing it as one of the top 100 innovations in 2009 by R&D Magazine. A member of the NCKRI board since 2009, Green served as vice chairman in 2016. NCKRI, located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, started as a federal institute within the U.S. National Park Service. NCKRI converted to a nonprofit corporation in 2006 to boost its ability to create partnerships with other organizations. The National Park Service along with the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the city of Carlsbad oversee NCKRI administration. SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/60bf7997-c479-49c7-8621-bb3764d42471


News Article | August 7, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

San Antonio - Aug. 7, 2017 - NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is peering down through clouds to get an unprecedented view of this year's hurricane activity. Already this season, five tropical storms have formed over the Atlantic Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean has had 20 tropical storms, five hurricanes, and two typhoons. The constellation of eight microsatellite spacecraft, built and operated by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), was launched into low-inclination, low-Earth orbit over the tropics on December 2016. CYGNSS is spending this hurricane season gathering data to help the weather forecasting community improve existing storm prediction models, said John Scherrer, a program director in SwRI's Space Science and Engineering Division. In recent decades, forecasters have greatly improved models that predict the path of hurricanes, but the ability to predict a storm's rapidly changing intensity has lagged. CYGNSS remains a research project for now as NASA evaluates the amount and accuracy of wind data it returns to Earth. It could become operational as a near-real-time forecasting tool next season if this year's storm data shows the expected improvement. "We are measuring wind speed at every spot in the tropics right now for four hours, twice a day," Scherrer said. "That's equivalent to a fleet of 32 hurricane hunter airplanes flying 24-7 throughout the tropics" Hurricane-penetrating aircraft have limited range and can spend only a short time inside a storm. Also, radar from weather satellites can't penetrate the heavy clouds near a hurricane's center to measure wind speeds and intensity. CYGNSS, however, works by receiving GPS satellite signals, which can penetrate even the heaviest cloud cover. The miniature satellites, each of which would fit atop a desk, measure how much GPS satellite signals are scattered as they reflect off the ocean surface. Greater scattering indicates a choppier surface due to higher wind speeds, which are a key component of storm intensity. "During this hurricane season, our team will stress-test our ground operations systems for near-real-time forecasting," said SwRI's Jillian Redfern, the CYGNSS project and mission operations manager. "We will downlink data from each of the eight 'microsats' at every ground station and then flow the data through the operations systems to the science community to minimize the time between 'acquiring' data to 'using' data. We anticipate increasing our ground contacts from the current level of four per day to 35 per day during testing. Fortunately, most of this will be automated." CYGNSS makes frequent measurements of ocean surface winds to monitor the location, intensity, size, and development of tropical cyclones. Flying in formation, the spacecraft cover an orbital swath that passes over most of the Earth's hurricane-producing zone, up to 35 degrees north and south of the Equator. SwRI, which led the engineering development and manages the operation of the constellation, is in Booth 57/58 at the Small Satellite Conference Aug. 5-10 in Logan, Utah. The University of Michigan Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering Department leads the science investigation, and the Earth Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate oversees the mission. SwRI's office in Boulder, Colorado, hosts the mission operations center, which commands the spacecraft, collects the telemetry, and transmits the data to the science operations center at the University of Michigan.


News Article | June 14, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) patented a new technology to inspect coatings of pipelines installed through horizontal directional drilling (HDD), a trenchless technology that has gained widespread acceptance over the past 20 years. The technology can determine both the extent and the configuration of any damage to the coating that occurs during HDD installation. “Our system provides a significant improvement over existing technologies that are only capable of estimating the extent of coating damage but do not provide information about the configuration of that damage,” said Dr. Pavan Shukla, one of the two SwRI engineers who invented the technology. Traditionally, workers install pipelines in open trenches, a method that disturbs roads, sidewalks, and environmentally sensitive areas. With this installation method, coating damage is more easily detected using various conventional techniques from the surface above the pipeline. HDD is used for pipelines that run under surface features, such as rivers, roadways, and railways, where trenching is not desirable or practical. Special methods and devices to detect coating damage and corrosion of HDD-installed pipelines are necessary because access to the surface above the pipeline is limited. Additionally, the HDD installation itself tends to damage coatings as pipeline segments are pulled through a borehole and contact soil, rock and other debris. The SwRI-patented technology can determine damage to the coating along both the length and around the circumference of the pipeline. Additional field testing is needed before the technology can be licensed for commercial use. SwRI’s “Detection of Coating Defects on Buried Pipelines Using Magnetic Field Variations within the Pipeline” (Patent No. 9,638,667) technology inspects pipeline segments for coating damage immediately after HDD installation. With this technology, engineers place a magnetic field sensor array within the pipeline. The sensor array generally matches the interior profile of the pipeline but is smaller. As the array moves along the pipeline, engineers analyze the output from each sensor to determine location, configuration, and the extent of coating damage. “It is important to determine the condition of the coating on the pipeline segment immediately after installation,” added Dr. Jay Fisher, the co-inventor of the technology. “Understanding the extent of any damage to the coating will help determine if it is too severe to be protected by a cathodic protection system, which inhibits the oxidation process and prevents corrosion, or whether it can be repaired or needs to be replaced before it is placed into service.” SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with nearly 2,700 employees and an annual research volume of $559 million. In 2017, SwRI celebrates 70 years of benefiting government, industry and the public with innovative R&D. Visit newsroom.swri.org for more SwRI developments. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0813b488-aa8c-4850-929c-62550a9f04df


Morbidelli A.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Nesvorny D.,SwRI
Astronomy and Astrophysics | Year: 2012

Context. Understanding the growth of the cores of giant planets is a difficult problem. Recently, Lambrechts & Johansen (2012, A&A, 544, A32, LJ12) proposed a new model in which the cores grow by the accretion of pebble-size objects, as the latter drift towards the star due to gas drag. Aims. We investigate the dynamics of pebble-size objects in the vicinity of planetary embryos of 1 and 5 Earth masses and the resulting accretion rates. Methods. We use hydrodynamical simulations, in which the embryo influences the dynamics of the gas and the pebbles suffer gas drag according to the local gas density and velocities. Results. The pebble dynamics in the vicinity of the planetary embryo is non-trivial, and it changes significantly with the pebble size. Nevertheless, the accretion rate of the embryo that we measure is within an order of magnitude of the rate estimated in LJ12 and tends to their value with increasing pebble-size. Conclusions. The model by LJ12 has the potential to explain the rapid growth of giant planet cores. The actual accretion rates however, depend on the surface density of pebble size objects in the disk, which is unknown to date. ©2012 ESO.

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