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De Rademaeker E.,Prevention Management International BVBA | Suter G.,Swissi Process Safety GmbH | Pasman H.J.,Texas A&M University | Fabiano B.,University of Genoa
Process Safety and Environmental Protection | Year: 2014

In 2013, the European Federation of Chemical Engineering (EFCE) celebrates its 60th anniversary. EFCE has continually promoted scientific collaboration and supported the work of engineers and scientists in thirty European countries. As for its mission statement, EFCE helps European Society to meet its needs through highlighting the role of Chemical Engineering in delivering sustainable processes and products. Within this organizational framework the Loss Prevention Symposium series, organized throughout Europe on behalf of the Loss Prevention Working Party of the EFCE, represents a fruitful tradition covering a time span of forty years. The tri-annual symposium gathers experts and scientists to seek technical improvements and scientific support for a growingly safer industry and quality of life. Following the loss prevention history in this paper, a time perspective on loss prevention and its future is presented. © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Source


Glor M.,Swissi Process Safety GmbH | Pey A.,Swissi Espana SLU
Journal of Electrostatics | Year: 2013

Computer modelling and simulation of electrostatic phenomena is nowadays not very often used in industry for an assessment of ignition hazards due to static electricity. With 4 examples (silo filling and assessment of occurrence of cone discharges, calculation of capacitances of screws and flanges for assessment of earthing and bonding requirements, influence of sample geometry on the surface resistance and surface resistivity and assessment of requirements for plastic hoses with a metal spiral for pneumatic transfer of powders) the usefulness and benefit of model calculations of electrostatic phenomena for the assessment of electrostatic ignition hazards is demonstrated. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Glor M.,Swissi Process Safety GmbH
Chemical Engineering Transactions | Year: 2016

In spiral coiled tubes electrostatic discharges - so called propagating brush discharges - have been observed during the pneumatic transfer of powders. Such discharges are rather energetic and may ignite most combustible powders. If the material in which the earthed metallic spiral coil is embedded is highly insulating, the charges resulting from friction between the powder particles and the inner tube wall cannot be quickly released to earth. As a consequence a high potential may be built-up on the inner wall giving rise to propagating brush discharges. Based on recent measurements of the charging current density and model calculations a safe upper limit of the resistivity of the material, in which the earthed coiled spiral is embedded, has been determined, below which no longer any propagating brush discharges will occur. The resistivity of a material can easily be determined from a sample in form of a cuboid or cylinder. This is however nearly impossible if the resistivity should be determined from a fully assembled spiral coiled tube without dismantling and destroying the whole tube. This paper gives guidance how this can be done by simple measurements and by interpreting the results with computer model calculations. © Copyright 2016, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Source


Glor M.,Swissi Process Safety GmbH
Chemical Engineering Transactions | Year: 2013

With 3 examples (silo filling and assessment of occurrence of cone discharges, calculation of capacitances of screws and flanges for assessment of earthing and bonding requirements and assessment of requirements for plastic hoses with a metal spiral for pneumatic transfer of powders) the usefulness and benefit of model calculations of electrostatic phenomena for the assessment of electrostatic ignition hazards is demonstrated. © 2013, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Source


Glor M.,Swissi Process Safety GmbH | Moritz K.,Merck KGaA
Chemical Engineering Transactions | Year: 2016

It is a well-known fact that the relative humidity of air may have an influence on the build-up of static electricity on equipment, installations, packages, personnel, etc. However the questions arise whether in industrial practice the increase of the relative humidity of air is sufficiently effective to prevent ignition of explosive atmospheres by static electricity, whether at high relative humidity earthing is no longer required and what are the limit values. In the present paper comprehensive measurements and results are presented, which clearly show that even an increase of the relative humidity of air above approximately 70% does not reduce the buildup of static electricity to such a degree that the well-known measures like earthing, use of conductive or dissipative materials, etc. are no longer required. © Copyright 2016, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Source

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