Swiss University of Distance Education

Switzerland

Swiss University of Distance Education

Switzerland
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Chiller-Glaus S.D.,University of Zürich | Chiller-Glaus S.D.,Swiss University of Distance Education | Schwaninger A.,Northwestern University | Schwaninger A.,University of Zürich | And 4 more authors.
Swiss Journal of Psychology | Year: 2011

This paper investigates whether the greater accuracy of emotion identification for dynamic versus static expressions, as noted in previous research, can be explained through heightened levels of either component or configural processing. Using a paradigm by Young, Hellawell, and Hay (1987), we tested recognition performance of aligned and misaligned composite faces with six basic emotions (happiness, fear, disgust, surprise, anger, sadness). Stimuli were created using 3D computer graphics and were shown as static peak expressions (static condition) and 7 s video sequences (dynamic condition). The results revealed that, overall, moving stimuli were better recognized than static faces, although no interaction between motion and other factors was found. For happiness, sadness, and surprise, misaligned composites were better recognized than aligned composites, suggesting that aligned composites fuse to form a single expression, while the two halves of misaligned composites are perceived as two separate emotions. For anger, disgust, and fear, this was not the case. These results indicate that emotions are perceived on the basis of both configural and component-based information, with specific activation patterns for separate emotions, and that motion has a quality of its own and does not increase configural or component-based recognition separately. © 2011 by Verlag Hans Huber, Hogrefe AG, Bern.


Weibel D.,University of Bern | Weibel D.,Swiss University of Distance Education | Wissmath B.,University of Bern | Wissmath B.,Swiss University of Distance Education | Mast F.W.,University of Bern
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2010

Previous research studies in the context of presence point out the importance of personality factors. Surprisingly, the relation between immersion and the Big Five personality factors has not yet been examined. Hence, we assessed these traits in an online survey (N =? 220) and relate them to immersive tendency, a disposition that determines whether someone is receptive to immersive experiences during media exposure. Using structural equation modeling, we can show that openness to experience, neuroticism, and extraversion are positively related to immersive tendency. The immersive tendency subscale absorption is related to openness to experience, whereas the immersive tendency subscale emotional involvement is related to openness, extraversion, and neuroticism. Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Weibel D.,University of Bern | Weibel D.,Swiss University of Distance Education | Stricker D.,University of Bern | Stricker D.,Swiss University of Distance Education | And 2 more authors.
Interactive Learning Environments | Year: 2012

We provided a virtual learning tool to undergraduate psychology students (n = 72) and investigated how different variables influence the learning outcome in terms of performance in an exam and satisfaction with the e-learning tool. These variables were: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude towards computers, attitude towards the learning subject and experiences of flow. The findings indicate that the attitudes towards computers and towards the learning subject as well as the perceived usefulness of the e-learning tool are predictors for learning success. These three variables influenced the outcome variables directly as well as indirectly via flow experiences and perceived ease of use. Thus, flow plays a crucial role and strongly influences satisfaction as well as performance. The results and their implications are discussed. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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