Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia

Swinburne University of Technology is an Australian public university of technology based in Melbourne, Victoria. Swinburne was founded in 1908 by the Honourable George Swinburne as the Eastern Suburbs Technical College. Its foundation campus is located in Hawthorn, a suburb of Melbourne which is located 7.5 km from the Melbourne central business district.In its first year, it enrolled 80 students in subjects including carpentry, plumbing and gas fitting. Today, Swinburne operates five campuses in two countries and has an enrolment of 60,000 students across vocational, undergraduate and postgraduate levels.In addition to its main Hawthorn campus, Swinburne has campuses in the Melbourne metropolitan area at Prahran, Wantirna and Croydon. Swinburne also has a branch campus in Sarawak, Malaysia which it has operated in partnership with the Sarawak State Government since 2000. Swinburne also have an online campus, Swinburne Online, which has been in operation since 2011. Internationally, Swinburne is ranked among the top 400 universities in the world by the Academic Ranking of World Universities and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and in the top 500 universities in the world by the 2013 QS World University Rankings. Swinburne is a member of the prestigious Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning, but its membership of European Consortium of Innovative Universities was inactive since 2012. Swinburne University of Technology is a principal partner to the Victorian Division of Engineers Australia. Wikipedia.


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Australian Company GlowThrow Begins Much-Awaited Kickstarter Crowdfunding Campaign in the Pet Niche for Innovative Glow-in-the-Dark Ball Launcher Product MELBOURNE, Australia, May 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, GlowThrow, a Melbourne-based company which has developed an ingenious pet-friendly product featuring the latest technology, has confirmed that it has launched a crowdfunding campaign on the global Kickstarter platform to help get its original provisional patent pending glow-in-the-dark fetch game for dogs off the ground. It is hoped that pet owners will be able to spend much more quality time with their dogs as the product can easily be used at night. Its target market is dog owners who get home after dark and people who happen to live in areas that get far less natural sunlight during the day, especially in winter. A 12-month labour of love has seen the GlowThrow developed and tested by a pet-centric lighting industry professional with a 7-year-old white coloured Whippet named Chicken who enjoys night time walks. Lachlan Scott is a heavy industrial mining lighting expert who earned his Degree from Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne. In the business world, he was a former Project Development Engineer and Sales Manager for a global lighting industry giant recording annual sales of $8.98 billion AUD per year. Importantly, with overall pet wellbeing and safety in mind, GlowThrow features a powerful inbuilt LED to charge the glow-in-the-dark ball whereby the LED and battery are located within the launcher rather than the ball - eliminating the risk of dogs accidentally eating the electronics while playing fetch. What's more, GlowThrow's unique design allows for a sustainable bright glow experience during every walk as the LED charges the Phosphor. "I work long hours and there can be so much emotion wrapped up in this as a dog owner. I felt so guilty working late. Our Whippet named Chicken really has a way of tugging at your heart strings. I think it must be the same for every pet owner who also finds themselves in our situation," expressed Lachlan Scott, Director, GlowThrow. "Now, the GlowThrow allows my girlfriend and me to get the most out of walks with Chicken - no matter what time we both can get home at. It has helped to nurture the bond that we have with our dog who feels so much like a part of the family. I guess a lot of people can relate to our story." Currently, with 2 staff and multiple outside contractors, GlowThrow solves a natural light problem for people who work long hours and often get home as the sun is setting or when it is already dark. Lachlan Scott also observed a major natural light issue when he lived in Vienna, Austria for 2 years. In the Northern Hemisphere, the sun sets at 4 pm in winter. Interestingly, from a quality of life standpoint, earlier this month, the Austrian capital was named the best city in the world to live in for the 8th year in a row. GlowThrow is committed to improving the quality of life for pet owners and dogs. In November 2016, the GlowThrow team filed for provisional patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The immediate goal is to complete a successful crowdfunding campaign and fulfil as many orders as possible with Kickstarter traction to get the product to backers. The vision for the business is to have GlowThrow stocked in as many pet shops as possible. GlowThrow is the world's only pet-friendly designed glow-in-the-dark fetch game for dogs that gives you the ability to keep the ball glowing super brightly while you effortlessly play fetch at night. To see GlowThrow in action at night visit: http://www.glowthrow.com/ To support and share our crowdfunding campaign to help to bring GlowThrow to the world please visit: http://kck.st/2roEBTk To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/glowthrow-launches-exciting-kickstarter-campaign-for-revolutionary-new-glow-in-the-dark-fetch-game-for-dogs-300459038.html


A 12-month labour of love has seen the GlowThrow developed and tested by a pet-centric lighting industry professional with a 7-year-old white coloured Whippet named Chicken who enjoys night time walks. Lachlan Scott is a heavy industrial mining lighting expert who earned his Degree from Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne. In the business world, he was a former Project Development Engineer and Sales Manager for a global lighting industry giant recording annual sales of $8.98 billion AUD per year. Importantly, with overall pet wellbeing and safety in mind, GlowThrow features a powerful inbuilt LED to charge the glow-in-the-dark ball whereby the LED and battery are located within the launcher rather than the ball - eliminating the risk of dogs accidentally eating the electronics while playing fetch. What's more, GlowThrow's unique design allows for a sustainable bright glow experience during every walk as the LED charges the Phosphor. "I work long hours and there can be so much emotion wrapped up in this as a dog owner. I felt so guilty working late. Our Whippet named Chicken really has a way of tugging at your heart strings. I think it must be the same for every pet owner who also finds themselves in our situation," expressed Lachlan Scott, Director, GlowThrow. "Now, the GlowThrow allows my girlfriend and me to get the most out of walks with Chicken - no matter what time we both can get home at. It has helped to nurture the bond that we have with our dog who feels so much like a part of the family. I guess a lot of people can relate to our story." Currently, with 2 staff and multiple outside contractors, GlowThrow solves a natural light problem for people who work long hours and often get home as the sun is setting or when it is already dark. Lachlan Scott also observed a major natural light issue when he lived in Vienna, Austria for 2 years. In the Northern Hemisphere, the sun sets at 4 pm in winter. Interestingly, from a quality of life standpoint, earlier this month, the Austrian capital was named the best city in the world to live in for the 8th year in a row. GlowThrow is committed to improving the quality of life for pet owners and dogs. In November 2016, the GlowThrow team filed for provisional patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The immediate goal is to complete a successful crowdfunding campaign and fulfil as many orders as possible with Kickstarter traction to get the product to backers. The vision for the business is to have GlowThrow stocked in as many pet shops as possible. GlowThrow is the world's only pet-friendly designed glow-in-the-dark fetch game for dogs that gives you the ability to keep the ball glowing super brightly while you effortlessly play fetch at night. To see GlowThrow in action at night visit: http://www.glowthrow.com/ To support and share our crowdfunding campaign to help to bring GlowThrow to the world please visit: http://kck.st/2roEBTk To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/glowthrow-launches-exciting-kickstarter-campaign-for-revolutionary-new-glow-in-the-dark-fetch-game-for-dogs-300459038.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A team of scientists from Australia, Belgium, Italy and the UK have demonstrated how ocean winds can generate spontaneous rogue waves, the first step to predicting the potentially dangerous phenomena. Rogue or freak waves are extremely high, steep waves appearing in deep ocean, surging without warning and seemingly at random. These events might cause severe damage to ships and structures like oil or gas platforms. The ability to forecast them would be hugely beneficial, but little is currently understood about what generates them. Researchers from The University of Melbourne (Australia), The Swinburne University of Technology (Australia), The University of Leuven (Belgium) and The University of East Anglia (UK) used a special circular wave tank at The University of Turin (Italy) to study the statistical properties of wind-generated waves, and therefore the likelihood of rogue wave development. Unlike previous experiments on rogue waves generated in conventional longitudinal tanks, the wave field they created by blowing wind in the annular wave flume can be thought of as infinitely long. Researchers started with still water in the tank, before turning on fans which replicated a steady wind, similar to conditions which might be seen on the ocean. Wind was blown over the surface for two hours, and the surface elevation of the water measured throughout. As wind starts blowing, an erratic wave field is generated. Rogue waves appear to develop naturally during the growth of the waves, and were detected just before the wave height reaches a stationary condition. The measurements let the research team estimate the probability of finding high steep waves, showing that this is higher than expected, thus providing crucial information about the mathematical likelihood of these waves occurring. Dr Davide Proment from UEA's School of Mathematics, said: "Despite a great effort made in recent decades the complete understanding of the formation of these extreme events remains elusive from the mathematical and physical point of view. "The particular geometry of the flume allowed us for the first time to create waves propagating circularly and continually - an 'unlimited-fetch' condition. Similar physical conditions actually appear in reality around the Antarctic continent where strong winds blow and seas states are notoriously extreme." The experiment took place at the TurLab facility of the Physics Department of the University of Turin (Italy). The experimental campaign was supported by the European Union through the European High Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence (EuHIT) consortium. 'Wind generated rogue waves in an annular flume' - A. Toffoli, D. Proment, H. Salman, J. Monbaliu, F. Frascoli, M.Dafilis, E. Stramignoni, R. Forza, M. Manfrin, and M. Onorato is published in the journal Physical Review Letters on Friday 7 April.


Graham A.W.,Swinburne University of Technology
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2012

The popular log-linear relation between supermassive black hole mass, Mbh, and the dynamical mass of the host spheroid, Msph, is shown to require a significant correction. Core galaxies, typically with M bh ≳ 2 × 108 M⊙ and thought to be formed in dry merger events, are shown to be well described by a linear relation for which the median black hole mass is 0.36% - roughly double the old value of constancy. Of greater significance is that Mbh α M2 sph among the (non-pseudobulge) lower-mass systems: specifically, log [Mbh/M⊙] = (1.92 0.38)log [M sph/7 × 1010 M⊙] + (8.38 ± 0.17). "Classical" spheroids hosting a 106 M ⊙ black hole will have Mbh/Msph 0.025%. These new relations presented herein (1) bring consistency to the relation α Mbhσ5 and the fact that α Lσx with exponents of 5 and 2 for bright (MB ≲ -20.5 mag) and faint spheroids, respectively, (2) mimic the non-(log-linear) behavior known to exist in the Mbh-(Sérsic n) diagram, (3) necessitate the existence of a previously overlooked Mbhα L2.5 relation for Sérsic (i.e., not core-Sérsic) galaxies, and (4) resolve past conflicts (in mass prediction) with the M bh-σ relation at the low-mass end. Furthermore, the bent nature of the Mbh-Msph relation reported here for "classical" spheroids will have a host of important implications that, while not addressed in this paper, relate to (1) galaxy/black hole formation theories, (2) searches for the fundamental, rather than secondary, black hole scaling relation, (3) black hole mass predictions in other galaxies, (4) alleged pseudobulge detections, (5) estimates of the black hole mass function and mass density based on luminosity functions, (6) predictions for space-based gravitational wave detections, (7) connections with nuclear star cluster scaling relations, (8) evolutionary studies over different cosmic epochs, (9) comparisons and calibrations matching inactive black hole masses with low-mass active galactic nucleus data, and more. © 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.


Reid M.D.,Swinburne University of Technology
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

Monogamy inequalities for the way bipartite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering can be distributed among N systems are derived. One set of inequalities is based on witnesses with two measurement settings, and may be used to demonstrate correlation of outcomes between two parties, that cannot be shared with more parties. It is shown that the monogamy for steering is directional. Two parties cannot independently demonstrate steering of a third system, using the same two-setting steering witness, but it is possible for one party to steer two independent systems. This result explains the monogamy of two-setting Bell inequality violations and the sensitivity of the continuous variable (CV) EPR criterion to losses on the steering party. We generalize to m settings. A second type of monogamy relation gives the quantitative amount of sharing possible, when the number of parties is less than or equal to m, and takes a form similar to the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters relation for entanglement. The results enable characterization of the tripartite steering for CV Gaussian systems and qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states. © 2013 American Physical Society.


We build a theoretical model to study the origin of the globular cluster metallicity bimodality in the hierarchical galaxy assembly scenario. The model is based on empirical relations such as the galaxy mass-metallicity relation [O/H]-Mstar as a function of redshift, and on the observed galaxy stellar mass function up to redshift z ∼ 4. We make use of the theoretical merger rates as a function of mass and redshift from the Millennium simulation to build galaxy merger trees. We derive a new galaxy [Fe/H]-Mstar relation as a function of redshift, and by assuming that globular clusters share the metallicity of their original parent galaxy at the time of their formation, we populate the merger tree with globular clusters. We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations of the galaxy hierarchical assembly, and study the properties of the final globular cluster population as a function of galaxy mass, assembly and star formation history, and under different assumptions for the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation. The main results and predictions of the model are the following. (1) The hierarchical clustering scenario naturally predicts a metallicity bimodality in the galaxy globular cluster population, where the metal-rich subpopulation is composed of globular clusters formed in the galaxy main progenitor around redshift z ∼ 2, and the metal-poor subpopulation is composed of clusters accreted from satellites, and formed at redshifts z ∼ 3-4. (2) The model reproduces the observed relations by Peng et al. for the metallicities of the metal-rich and metal-poor globular cluster subpopulations as a function of galaxy mass; the positions of the metal-poor and metal-rich peaks depend exclusively on the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the [O/Fe], both of which can be constrained by this method. In particular, we find that the galaxy [O/Fe] evolves linearly with redshift from a value of ∼0.5 at redshift z ∼ 4 to a value of ∼0.1 at z = 0. (3) For a given galaxy mass, the relative strength of the metal-rich and metal-poor peaks depends exclusively on the galaxy assembly and star formation history, where galaxies living in denser environments and/or early-type galaxies show a larger fraction of metal-poor clusters, while galaxies with a sparse merger history and/or late-type galaxies are dominated by metal-rich clusters. (4) The globular cluster metallicity bimodality disappears for galaxy masses around and below Mstar ∼ 109 M⊙, and for redshifts z > 2. © 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.


Van Straten W.,Swinburne University of Technology
Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series | Year: 2013

A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long timescales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semimajor axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it also places PSR J1022+1001 among the 10 best pulsars regularly observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is shown that the timing accuracy of a large fraction of the pulsars in the PPTA is currently limited by the systematic timing error due to instrumental polarization artifacts. More importantly, long-term variations of systematic error are correlated between different pulsars, which adversely affects the primary objectives of any pulsar timing array experiment. These limitations may be overcome by adopting the techniques presented in this work, which relax the demand for instrumental polarization purity and thereby have the potential to reduce the development cost of next-generation telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array. © 2013 The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.


Graham A.W.,Swinburne University of Technology
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2012

Four new nuclear star cluster masses, M nc, plus seven upper limits, are provided for galaxies with previously determined black hole masses, M bh. Together with a sample of 64 galaxies with direct M bh measurements, 13 of which additionally now have M nc measurements rather than only upper limits, plus an additional 29 dwarf galaxies with available M nc measurements and velocity dispersions σ, an diagram is constructed. Given that major dry galaxy merger events preserve the M bh/L ratio, and given that L∝σ 5 for luminous galaxies, it is first noted that the observation M bh∝σ 5 is consistent with expectations. For the fainter elliptical galaxies it is known that L∝σ 2, and assuming a constant M nc/L ratio, the expectation that M nc∝σ 2 is in broad agreement with our new observational result that M nc∝σ 1.57 ± 0.24. This exponent is however in contrast to the value of ∼4 which has been reported previously and interpreted in terms of a regulating feedback mechanism from stellar winds. Finally, it is predicted that host galaxies fainter than M B∼-20.5 mag (i.e. those not formed in dry merger events) which follow the relation M bh∝σ 5, and are thus not 'pseudo-bulges', should not have a constant M bh/M host ratio but instead have. It is argued that the previous near-linear and relations have been biased by the sample selection of luminous galaxies, and as such should not be used to constrain the co-evolution of supermassive black holes in galaxies other than those luminous few built by major dry merger events. © 2012 The Author Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society © 2012 RAS.


Liu X.-J.,Swinburne University of Technology
Physics Reports | Year: 2013

A strongly correlated Fermi system plays a fundamental role in very different areas of physics, from neutron stars, quark-gluon plasmas, to high temperature superconductors. Despite the broad applicability, it is notoriously difficult to be understood theoretically because of the absence of a small interaction parameter. Recent achievements of ultracold trapped Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance have ushered in enormous changes. The unprecedented control of interaction, geometry and purity in these novel systems has led to many exciting experimental results, which are to be urgently understood at both low and finite temperatures. Here we review the latest developments of virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi gas and their applications on ultracold trapped Fermi atoms. We show remarkable, quantitative agreements between virial predictions and various recent experimental measurements at about the Fermi degenerate temperature. For equations of state, we discuss a practical way of determining high-order virial coefficients and use it to calculate accurately the long-sought third-order virial coefficient, which is now verified firmly in experiments at ENS and MIT. We discuss also virial expansion of a new many-body parameter-Tan's contact. We then turn to less widely discussed issues of dynamical properties. For dynamic structure factors, the virial prediction agrees well with the measurement at the Swinburne University of Technology. For single-particle spectral functions, we show that the expansion up to the second order accounts for the main feature of momentum-resolved rf-spectroscopy for a resonantly interacting Fermi gas, as recently reported by JILA. In the near future, more practical applications with virial expansion are possible, owing to the ever-growing power in computation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Glazebrook K.,Swinburne University of Technology
Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia | Year: 2013

The last seven years have seen an explosion in the number of Integral Field galaxy surveys, obtaining resolved 2D spectroscopy, especially at high-redshift. These have taken advantage of the mature capabilities of 8-10 m class telescopes and the development of associated technology such as AO. Surveys have leveraged both high spectroscopic resolution enabling internal velocity measurements and high spatial resolution from AO techniques and sites with excellent natural seeing. For the first time, we have been able to glimpse the kinematic state of matter in young, assembling star-forming galaxies and learn detailed astrophysical information about the physical processes and compare their kinematic scaling relations with those in the local Universe. Observers have measured disc galaxy rotation, merger signatures, and turbulence-enhanced velocity dispersions of gas-rich discs. Theorists have interpreted kinematic signatures of galaxies in a variety of ways (rotation, merging, outflows, and feedback) and attempted to discuss evolution vs. theoretical models and relate it to the evolution in galaxy morphology. A key point that has emerged from this activity is that substantial fractions of high-redshift galaxies have regular kinematic morphologies despite irregular photometric morphologies and this is likely due to the presence of a large number of highly gas-rich discs. There has not yet been a review of this burgeoning topic. In this first Dawes review, I will discuss the extensive kinematic surveys that have been done and the physical models that have arisen for young galaxies at high-redshift. © 2013 Astronomical Society of Australia.

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