SVPUA and T

Meerut, India

SVPUA and T

Meerut, India
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Manju Y.,Banasthali University | Kumar Y.Y.,S.V.P.U.A. and T | Pushpendra K.,S.V.P.U.A. and T | Kumar S.R.,S.V.P.U.A. and T | And 11 more authors.
Research Journal of Biotechnology | Year: 2017

Simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker system was used to assess the genetic diversity among forty pigeonpea genotypes using eighty primer pairs. The banding pattern was recorded in the form of 0-1 data sheet which was analyzed using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean based on Jaccard's similarity coefficient. The results revealed that out of 80 SSR primers, 65 primers showed distinct polymorphism indicating the robust nature of microsatellites in revealing polymorphism. The number of alleles generated by each marker ranged from 2 to 7, with an average of 3.4 alleles. The polymorphism information content values for the SSR loci ranged from 0.24 to 0.86. Higher PIC value was observed for SSR primer CZ681974 (0.86) and lowest PIC value (0.24) was observed for the primer CZ682005. The SSR markers showed an average PIC value of 0.50. Markers with PIC values of 0.5 or higher are highly efficient in revealing genetic studies and are extremely valuable in distinguishing the polymorphism rate of a marker at a specific locus. The cluster analysis showed higher level of genetic variation among the genotypes. Similarity coefficients ranged from 0.45 to 0.93. The dendrogram based on the cluster analysis by microsatellite polymorphism, grouped 40 pigeonpea varieties into 2 major clusters which were further grouped into different sub-clusters. Based on the present study, the large range of similarity values for related genotypes using simple sequence repeats (SSR) provides greater certainty for the evaluation of genetic diversity and relationships for background selections during hybridization based crop improvement programmes.


Kumar S.,S.V.P.U.A. and T. | Prasad H.N.,C.S.A.U.A. and T. | Kishor R.,C.S.A.U.A. and T.
Plant Archives | Year: 2016

In Indian economy, the agricultural sector still contributes about 34 per cent to our national income where nearly 70 per cent of the population depends. In this regard, the I.C.A.R. introduced several first line transfers of technology projects. The Krishi Vigyan Kendra (Farm Science Centre) is one of them. In pursuance of the recommendations of Education Commission (1964-66) and Dr. Mohan Singh Mehta Committee report to establish institutions for providing vocational education in agriculture at the pre and post matriculate level, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research has started a scheme to establish KrishiVigyan Kendra's in the country. The national commission and Agriculture (1976) recommended the establishment of one K.V.K. The first K.V.K. was established in 1974 at Pondicherry under the administrative control of the Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore (T.N.) since then several K.V.Ks were established in different parts of the country. Up to October 31, 2016, 651 KVKs were established in the country. In Uttar Pradesh there were 68 KVKs established up to October, 2016 and the number is increasing every year. In U.P. district Pilibhit under the jurisdiction of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture & Technology, Modipuram, Meerut, was purposively selected as locale for present's investigation because the researcher was well acquainted with the locality and culture. There are 7 development blocks in district Pilibhit. All the blocks are covered under KrishiVigyan Kendra Pilibhit. Therefore, due to limited time and resources only two blocks i.e., Marauri and Lalorikhera were selected purposively for conducting present research projects. The reason for the selection of above blocks was that the Krishi Vigyan Kendra Pilibhit was also running training programmes. Majority of trained farmers was in the category of higher adoption is 86.66 per cent, followed by medium 13.33 per cent in respect of HYV. Seed rate, time and method of sowing, fertilizer application and improved agricultural implements of paddy crops, but for plant protection majority was under non-adopters category (76.66 per cent) followed by low high and medium. Majority of trained farmers had higher adoption in all the five selected practices of wheat except plant protection, where majority was under non-adoption i.e. 70 per cent. The majority of trained farmers 73.33 per cent were found under higher adoption of H.Y.V. followed by fertilizer application (66.66 per cent) and seed rate time and method of sowing of potato crops. In remaining practices like plant protection and use of improved agricultural implements 70 per cent and 31.66 per cent, respectively fell in the category of non adoption. The majority of trained farmers had higher adoption in the fertilizer application (66.66 per cent) seed rate time and method of sowing (65.00 per cent) and H.Y.V. (58.33 per cent) sugarcane.


Kumar S.,S.V.P.U.A. and T. | Prasad H.N.,C.S.A.U.A. and T. | Kishor R.,C.S.A.U.A. and T.
Plant Archives | Year: 2016

In Indian economy, the agricultural sector still contributes about 34 percent to our national income where nearly 70 percent of the population depends. Despite sustained efforts in agriculture and spectacular strides made in agriculture technology over the past several decades. There are a large number of school drop-outs in the rural areas who need training, in selected vocations, especially in agriculture so that they may be suitably employed in farming. In this regard, the I.C.A.R. introduced several first line transfers of technology projects. The Krishi Vigyan Kendra (Farm Science Centre) is one of them. In pursuance of the recommendations of Education Commission (1964-66) and Dr. Mohan Singh Mehta Committee report to establish institutions for providing vocational education in agriculture at the pre and post matriculate level, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research has started a scheme to establish Krishi Vigyan Kendra's in the country. The national commission and Agriculture (1976) recommended the establishment of one K.V.K. The first K.V.K. was established in 1974 at Pondicherry under the administrative control of the Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore (T.N.) since then several K.V. Ks were established in different parts of the country. Upto October 31, 2016, 651 KVKs were established in the country. Farmers perception on the problems faced by them during the training programmes of K.V.K., which is preferential order from most felt to least are lack of incentives (83.33 per cent) problems of conveyance (80 per cent) problems of boarding and lodging (71.66 per cent), no. proper follow up of activities (68.33 per cent), problems regarding to course content (51.66 per cent), irregular class held (38.33 per cent) and problems in monthly training (26.66%).


Sugarcane is a major commercial crop consuming more labour force for planting. Sugarcane planting is a time consuming and labour intensive operation in sugarcane cultivation. In the traditional method in India, all the sugarcane cultivation processes are carried out by manual labour except land preparation. Sugarcane planting requires manual power and a pair of bullock or a tractor with ridger to plant sugarcane setts in one hectare on an average. Although number of useful machines have been designed, developed and being manufactured for cultivating sugarcane, but due to lack of extension and socio-economic reasons, still majority of the farmers are using indigenous tools and equipments. Shortage of timely labour availability and exorbitant wages compel our farmers to limit their acreage under sugarcane crop. Therefore there is an urgent need to mechanize sugarcane planting operations for reducing the cost of planting, as well as, for reducing the human drudgery involved. The field trials of Khalsa Make three row automatic sugarcane planter was conducted for planting of sugarcane at farmers' field as well as at research farm. The performance indicators of the planter viz. field capacity, efficiency etc. were calculated. The effective field capacity was 0.38 ha/h with field efficiency up to 70.4%. © 2012 Society for Sugar Research & Promotion.


Kumar S.,SVPUA and T | Singh M.,SVPUA and T | Singh B.R.,SVPUA and T
Soil and Tillage Research | Year: 2013

The high seed rate and labor requirement are common problems associated to traditional sowing of bold seeds. For bold seeds such as maize, cotton, groundnut and pigeon pea planting and fertilizer placement are the two different unit operations performed either by tractor drawn planter or manually. Performance of tractor-drawn, commercially available raised bed planter for planting of wheat at the bed was tested. The machine has trapezoidal hopper and an inclined plate type metering unit. A suitable furrow opener system was equipped with the machine to place the seeds at the bed at desired depth. The power transmission to the metering unit is through a ground wheel by chain-sprockets system. The field trials were conducted for sowing of different seeds at farmers' field. The performance indicators of the planter viz. field capacity and efficiency were calculated by using the observed data in the field. An average field capacity of 0.28ha/h to 0.31 was obtained for continuous operation of raised bed planter at an average speed of 2.27km/h. A field efficiency of 71-73% was observed which was in the prescribed range of 65-75% for row crop planter. The average depth of placement of seed of 10 observations randomly selected was 4.1cm. The field machine index was recorded at an average of 77.38%. The seed rate obtained was 91kg/ha for wheat and depth of sowing was 38-45mm. Average plant population (plant/m2) after germination was found under the prescribed range i.e. 141-171. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Singh P.,S.V.P.U.A and T | Shukla U.N.,Banaras Hindu University | Kumar K.,Banaras Hindu University | Singh S.,Banaras Hindu University | And 2 more authors.
Bangladesh Journal of Botany | Year: 2014

Among genotypes, Dekalb 900 M Gold recorded significantly higher dry matter/plant, LAI, cobs placement height, grain yield, nitrogen content, protein content, protein yield and protein productivity than other genotypes. Leaves/plant and phytosynthetically active radiation (PAR) above canopy did not influenced by genotypes. Dry matter/plant, plant height, LAI, cobs placement height, protein content, protein yield and protein productivity exhibited higher under highest levels of nitrogen (160 kg N/ha), but at par with 120 kg N/ha. However, grain yield (6300 kg/ha) was highest under nitrogen levels of 120 kg/ha, but also at par with 160 kg N/ha (6240 kg/ha). The effect of applied nitrogen was found non-significant in respect of leaves/plant, PAR above and below canopy, photosynthetically active radiation interception and days taken to tasseling and silking.

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