Sacramento, CA, United States
Sacramento, CA, United States

Sutter Health is a not-for-profit health system in Northern California, headquartered in Sacramento. It includes doctors, hospitals and other health care services in more than 100 Northern California cities and towns. Major service lines of Sutter Health-affiliated hospitals include cardiac care, women’s and children’s services, cancer care, orthopedics and advanced patient safety technology. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

For Some, Pre-Hospice Care Can Be A Good Alternative To Hospitals Gerald Chinchar, a Navy veteran who loves TV Westerns, isn't quite at the end of his life, but the end is probably not far away. The 77-year-old's medications fill a dresser drawer, and congestive heart failure puts him at high risk of emergency room visits and long hospital stays. He fell twice last year, shattering his hip and femur, and now gets around his San Diego home in a wheelchair. Above all, Chinchar hopes to avoid another long stint in the hospital. He still likes to go watch his grandchildren's sporting events and play blackjack at the casino. "If they told me I had six months to live, or [could instead] go to the hospital and last two years, I'd say leave me home," he said. "That ain't no trade for me." Most aging people would choose to stay home in their last years of life. But for many, it doesn't work out: They go in and out of hospitals, getting treated for flare-ups of various chronic illnesses. It's a massive problem that costs the health care system billions of dollars and has galvanized health providers, hospital administrators and policymakers to search for solutions. Sharp HealthCare, the San Diego health system where Chinchar receives care, has devised a way to fulfill his wishes and reduce costs at the same time. It's a pre-hospice program called Transitions, designed to give elderly patients the care they want at home and keep them out of the hospital. Social workers and nurses from Sharp regularly visit patients in their homes to explain what they can expect in their final years, help them make end-of-life plans and teach them how to better manage their diseases. Physicians track their health and scrap unnecessary medications. Unlike hospice care, patients in this program don't need to have a prognosis of six months or less to live, and they can continue getting treatment that is aimed at curing their illnesses, not just treating symptoms. Before the Transitions program started, the only option for many patients in a health crisis was to call 911 and be rushed to the emergency room. Now, they can get round-the-clock access to nurses, one phone call away. "Transitions is for just that point where people are starting to realize they can see the end of the road," said Dr. Dan Hoefer, a San Diego palliative care and family practice physician, and one of the creators of the program. "We are trying to help them through that process," he said, "so it's not filled with chaos." The importance of programs like Transitions is likely to grow in coming years as 10,000 baby boomers — many with multiple chronic diseases — turn 65 every day. Transitions was among the first of its kind, but several such programs, formally known as home-based palliative care, have since opened around the country. They are part of a broader push to improve people's health and reduce spending through better coordination of care and more treatment outside hospital walls. But a huge barrier stands in the way of pre-hospice programs: There is no clear way to pay for them. Health providers typically get paid for office visits and procedures, and hospitals still get reimbursed for patients in their beds. The services provided by home-based palliative care don't fit that model. In recent years, however, pressure has mounted to continue moving away from traditional payment systems. The Affordable Care Act has established new rules and pilot programs that reward the quality of care, rather than the quantity. Those changes are helping to make home-based palliative care a more viable option. In San Diego, Sharp's palliative care program has a strong incentive to reduce the cost of caring for its patients, who are all in Medicare managed care. The nonprofit health organization receives a fixed amount of money per member each month, so it can pocket what it doesn't spend on hospital stays and other costly medical interventions. Palliative care focuses on relieving patients' stress, pain and other symptoms as their health declines, and it helps them maintain their quality of life. It's for people with serious illnesses, such as cancer, dementia and heart failure. The idea is for patients to get palliative care and then move into hospice care, but they don't always make that transition. The 2014 report "Dying in America," by the Institute of Medicine, recommended that all people with serious advanced illness have access to palliative care. Many hospitals now have palliative care programs, delivered by teams of social workers, chaplains, doctors and nurses, for patients who aren't yet ready for hospice. But until recently, few such efforts had opened beyond the confines of hospitals. Kaiser Permanente set out to address this gap nearly 20 years ago, creating a home-based palliative care program that it tested in California and later in Hawaii and Colorado. Two studies by Kaiser and others found that participants were far more likely to be satisfied with their care and more likely to die at home than those not in the program. (Kaiser Health News is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.) One of the studies, published in 2007, found that 36 percent of people receiving palliative care at home were hospitalized in their final months, compared with 59 percent of those getting standard care. The overall cost of care for those who participated in the program was a third less than for those who didn't. "We thought, 'Wow. We have something that works,'" said Susan Enguidanos, an associate professor of gerontology at the University of Southern California's Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, who worked on both studies. "Immediately we wanted to go and change the world." But Enguidanos knew that Kaiser Permanente was unlike most health organizations. It was responsible for both insuring and treating its patients, so it had a clear financial motivation to improve care and control costs. Enguidanos said she talked to medical providers around the nation about this type of palliative care, but the concept didn't take off at the time. Providers kept asking the same question: How do you pay for it without charging patients or insurers? "I liken it to paddling out too soon for the wave," she said. "We were out there too soon. ... But we didn't have the right environment, the right incentive." Hoefer is a former hospice and home health medical director and has spent years treating elderly patients. He learned an important lesson when seeing patients in his office: Despite the medical care they received, "they were far more likely to be admitted to the hospital than make it back to see me." When his patients were hospitalized, many would decline quickly. Even if their immediate symptoms were treated successfully, they would sometimes leave the hospital less able to take care of themselves. They would get infections or suffer from delirium. Some would fall. Hoefer's colleague, Suzi Johnson, a nurse and administrator in Sharp's hospice program, saw the opposite side of the equation. Patients admitted into hospice care would make surprising turnarounds once they stopped going to the hospital and started getting medical and social support at home, instead. Some lived longer than doctors had expected. In 2005, the pair hatched a bold idea: What if they could design a home-based program for patients before they were eligible for hospice? Thus, Transitions was born. They modeled their new program in part on the Kaiser experiment, then set out to persuade doctors, medical directors and financial officers to try it. But they met resistance from physicians and hospital administrators who were used to getting paid for seeing patients. "We were doing something that was really revolutionary, that really went against the culture of health care at the time," Johnson said. "We were inspired by the broken system and the opportunity we saw to fix something." Despite the concerns, Sharp's foundation board gave the pair a $180,000 grant to test out Transitions. And in 2007, they started with heart failure patients and later expanded the program to those with advanced cancer, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other progressive illnesses. They started to win over some doctors who appreciated having additional eyes on their patients, but they still encountered "some skepticism about whether it was really going to do any good for our patients," said Dr. Jeremy Hogan, a neurologist with Sharp. "It wasn't really clear to the group ... what the purpose of providing a service like this was." Nevertheless, Hogan referred some of his dementia patients to the program and quickly realized that the extra support for them and their families meant fewer panicked calls and emergency room trips. Hoefer said doctors started realizing home-based care made sense for these patients — many of whom were too frail to get to a doctor's office regularly. "At this point in the patient's life, we should be bringing health care to the patient, not the other way around," he said. Across the country, more doctors, hospitals and insurers are starting to see the value of home-based palliative care, said Kathleen Kerr, a health care consultant who researches palliative care. "It is picking up steam," she said. "You know you are going to take better care of this population, and you are absolutely going to have lower health care costs." Providers are motivated in part by a growing body of research. Two studies of Transitions in 2013 and 2016 reaffirmed that such programs save money. The second study, led by outside evaluators, showed it saved more than $4,200 per month on cancer patients and nearly $3,500 on those with heart failure. The biggest differences occurred in the final two months of life, said one of the researchers, Brian Cassel, who is palliative care research director at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond. Nurse Sheri Juan and social worker Mike Velasco, who both work for Sharp, walked up a wooden ramp to the Chinchars' front door one recent January morning. Juan rolled a small suitcase behind her containing a blood pressure cuff, a stethoscope, books, a laptop computer and a printer. Late last year, Gerald Chinchar's doctor recommended he enroll in Transitions, explaining that his health was in a "tenuous position." Chinchar has nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. He has had breathing problems much of his life, suffering from asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — ailments he partly attributes to the four decades he spent painting and sandblasting fuel tanks for work. Chinchar also recently learned he had heart failure. "I never knew I had any heart trouble," he said. "That was the only good thing I had going for me." Now he's trying to figure out how to keep it from getting worse: How much should he drink? What is he supposed to eat? That's where Juan comes in. Her job is to make sure the Chinchars understand Gerald's disease so he doesn't have a flare-up that could send him to the emergency room. She sat beside the couple in their living room and asked a series of questions: Any pain today? How is your breathing? Juan checked his blood pressure and examined his feet and legs for signs of more swelling. She looked through his medications and told him which ones the doctor wanted him to stop taking. "What we like to do as a palliative care program is streamline your medication list," she told him. "They may be doing more harm than good." His wife, Mary Jo Chinchar, said she appreciates the visits, especially the advice about what Gerald should eat and drink. Her husband doesn't always listen to her, she said. "It's better to come from somebody else." Outpatient palliative care programs are cropping up in various forms. Some new ones are run by insurers, others by health systems or hospice organizations. Others are for-profit, including Aspire Health, which was started by former senator Bill Frist in 2013. Sutter Health operates a project called Advanced Illness Management to help patients manage symptoms and medications and plan for the future. The University of Southern California and Blue Shield of California recently received a $5 million grant to provide and study outpatient care. "The climate has changed for palliative care," said Enguidanos, the lead investigator on the USC-Blue Shield project. Ritchie said she expects even more home-based programs in the years to come. "My expectation is that much of what is being done in the hospital won't need to be done in the hospital anymore and it can be done in people's homes," she said. Challenges remain, however. Some doctors are unfamiliar with the approach, and patients may be reluctant, especially those who haven't clearly been told they have a terminal diagnosis. Now, some palliative care providers and researchers worry about the impact of President Donald Trump's plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act and revamp Medicare — efforts that seem to be back in play. Gerald Chinchar, who grew up in Connecticut, said he never expected to live into old age. In his family, Chinchar said, "you're an old-timer if you make 60." Chinchar said he gave up drinking and is trying to eat less of his favorite foods — steak sandwiches and fish and chips. He just turned 77, a milestone he credits partly to the pre-hospice program. "If I make 80, I figured I did pretty good," he said. "And if I make 80, I'll shoot for 85." This story is part of NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. KHN is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. You can follow Anna Gorman on Twitter: @annagorman.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A sign on a restaurant informs customers that the facility is closed due to a power cut, in the financial district of San Francisco, California, U.S. April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A power outage triggered by a fire in a utility substation blacked out much of San Francisco on Friday, paralyzing the city's technology and finance center, halting its famed cable cars and shuttering major retailers. The utility PG&E Corp reported a fire and a circuit-breaker failure at a San Francisco substation, with a series of outages hitting the Bay Area city shortly after 9 a.m. (noon ET/1600 GMT) and ultimately cutting power to some 90,000 customers. Office workers in the city's financial district spilled out onto the sidewalks, wandering the streets in search of an open cafe, or stood waiting in the lobbies of their buildings as elevators came to a stop. "It's pretty big, seems like half the city has no power," said King Lip, chief investment officer at Baker Avenue Asset Management in San Francisco. "We were in the middle of a trade." Fourteen neighborhoods were affected, including the main shopping district near Union Square, where stores and coffee shops turns signs to closed and major retailers such as Macy's and Louis Vuitton shut their doors. In a city proud of its technological prowess, the outage forced residents back to the dark ages. At the salad bar chain MIXT downtown, cashiers took credit card payments using old-fashioned paper imprints, as customers lined up to eat in the dim natural light. "Old school," commented patron Ben Fackler. "I haven't seen that in forever." By 3 p.m. electricity had been restored to less than a third of the affected customers and PG&E spokesman Paul Doherty said that it would be several more hours before the rest would be brought back online. "Workers have entered the substation. They're assessing the damage and starting to make repairs,” Doherty said. San Francisco International Airport remained operational, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said through a spokesperson that the agency had not received any reports indicating that the outage was related to any security or terrorism incident. The spokesperson requested anonymity, citing department policy. "This had nothing to do with cyber," said Joe Weiss, an expert on control system cyber security who has testified to Congress about structural weaknesses in grid components. "The real question is how could one substation take out, effectively, San Francisco? What other failures occurred there that didn’t isolate this?" Wells Fargo & Co closed 13 bank branches and four office buildings, while the New York Stock Exchange said its ARCA options trading floor in San Francisco was briefly unavailable because of the power outage. For more than two hours, trains streamed through the Montgomery Street station as the outage prevented them from stopping until backup generators came on line at about 11:30 a.m., Bay Area Rapid Transit said. At Saint Francis Memorial Hospital in the Nob Hill neighborhood, all non-essential appointments and procedures had been canceled, spokeswoman Blair Holloway said. Two of four campuses of Sutter Health's California Pacific Medical Center were also impacted by the outage, spokesman Dean Fryer said. Elective surgeries were canceled and emergency patients were directed to other hospitals, Fryer said.


Stewart W.F.,Sutter Health | Roy J.,University of Pennsylvania | Lipton R.B.,Yeshiva University
Neurology | Year: 2013

Objective: To determine whether the known higher prevalence of migraine in lower household (HH) income groups is explained by a higher incidence rate or a lower remission rate. Methods: We used data from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study, a US national sample of 132,674 females (with a 64.3% response rate) and 124,665 males (with a 62.0% response rate) 12 years of age and older. Data were previously collected on migraine symptoms, onset age, and demographics. Previously validated methods applied to the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study data were used to simulate a cohort study. Incidence and remission rates were estimated within 3 sex-specific HH income groups (<$22,500, $22,500-$59,999, and ≥$60,000). The χ2 test was used to determine whether the incidence or remission rates differed by HH income group as an explanation for differences in migraine prevalence by HH income. Results: Migraine prevalence increased as HH income decreased for females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Differences were not explained by race and other known confounders. Variation in prevalence was explained, in large part, by a higher incidence rate in the lower HH income groups for both females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Migraine remission rates did not differ by HH income. Conclusions: The higher incidence of migraine in lower HH income groups is compatible with the social causation hypothesis. Once initiated, migraine remission is independent of HH income. Onset and remission may have etiologically distinct causes. © 2013 American Academy of Neurology.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A local surgeon is among the first in California to combine innovative techniques and new technology to improve the treatment of breast cancer. Dr. Anne G. W. Peled, M.D., surgeon at Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) is using an approach called oncoplastic surgery and a tiny new implant, called BioZorb, to provide better cosmetic outcomes after surgery and allow more precise targeting of radiation treatment. Dr. Peled, a breast oncologic surgeon and board-certified plastic surgeon with the CPMC breast cancer program, has helped pioneer use of the BioZorb marker. The three-dimensional device is placed during lumpectomy surgery, which removes the cancer and preserves the breast. This approach facilitates oncoplastic techniques, which involve rearrangement of the patient’s own breast tissue to provide both cancer control and more aesthetically pleasing results. “There are several ways BioZorb really helps our breast cancer patients,” Dr. Peled said. “Using this device provides a framework to help reshape the breast after surgery. It also allows the radiation oncologist to more precisely target radiation therapy. Longer term, it makes it easier to track the site of tumor removal on follow-up mammograms.” Susan Yeres, 62, is among Dr. Peled’s patients whose treatment included use of the marker. A San Rafael resident, Yeres is an independent consultant in the juvenile and criminal justice system. She was found to have a small tumor in each breast. In consultation with Dr. Peled, she decided to have a breast reduction and lumpectomy in both breasts. “Given that I had a breast reduction, the marker increased the ability to locate the original cancer site. It allowed me to have more extensive surgery and still have the original spot of the cancer easily identified,” she said. “I also feel good about the cosmetic outcome of the process. Having one surgeon do both the plastic surgery and oncological surgery was a winning idea for me.” Yeres noted that the marker fit well with her shorter course of follow-up radiation. “It was wonderful to be able to reduce the number of scans thanks to the marker,” she said. “It made the last portion of the treatment very easy.” Yeres had a quick recovery from treatment and was able to go on vacation shortly afterward. Among the radiation oncologists noting the benefit of using the BioZorb at CPMC is Dr. John W. Lee. He said the marker allowed him in most cases to narrow the radiation field to limit exposure to healthy tissue and surrounding organs such as the heart and lung. "The benefits to the patient with the marker are, first, they get better targeting because we know exactly where the tumor was; and second, fewer side effects because we don't have to treat such a large area of the breast," Dr. Lee said. BioZorb is the first device that identifies in a fixed, three-dimensional manner where the tumor was removed. The implantable device consists of a framework made of a bioabsorbable material that holds six titanium clips. The framework slowly dissolves as cells grow into the tumor cavity over the course of a year or more. The tiny marker clips stay in place so the surgical site can be viewed for long-term monitoring such as future mammograms. Where do these new approaches fit with other trends in breast cancer treatment? “Most of our patients are now wonderfully lucky to have their cancers detected early and to live a long time after their treatment,” Dr. Peled said. “After treatment they really want to have breasts that they are happy with and to feel like they are getting the right treatment that’s tailored for them.” “I love being able to offer this marker as a possibility for my patients,” Peled added “It lets them know I’m thinking about how to achieve the best outcome and gives them a great feeling about participating in something that’s going to advance the way we treat breast cancer.” About Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) At San Francisco’s California Pacific Medical Center, we believe in the power of medicine. We research the most up-to-date treatments, hire the most qualified individuals, and practice the most modern, innovative medicine available. We deliver the highest-quality expert care with kindness and compassion in acute, post-acute and outpatient services, as well as preventive and complementary medicine. As an affiliate of Sutter Health and one of California’s largest private, community-based, not-for-profit, teaching medical centers, we are able to reach deep into our community to provide education, screening and financial support in some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods. Like us on Facebook, watch us on YouTube and follow us on Twitter. For more information visit our web site at http://www.cpmc.org.


SACRAMENTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Surgical Affiliates Management Group, a leading surgical hospitalist company with proven results, today announced the launch of a new acute care orthopedic surgicalist services program at Memorial Hospital Los Banos (MHLB), part of the Sutter Health network. Located in the rural San Joaquin Valley of Central California approximately 60 miles south east of San Jose, MHLB is a 44-bed facility providing acute care and is the only full-service hospital serving Los Banos and the surrounding geographic areas. With the opening of this new program, residents will now have access 24/7 to acute orthopedic surgical care in their own backyard. “Surgical Affiliates is already successfully partnering with Los Banos in the hospital’s acute general surgery program, so it made sense for us to bring in a complementary orthopedic surgical team,” said Leon J. Owens, MD, FACS, CEO of Surgical Affiliates Management Group. “We have implemented these orthopedic surgicalist programs in hospitals in busy metropolitan areas and in rural locations, where the challenge of getting consistent orthopedic surgical coverage is especially difficult. This program is a long-term, sustainable approach to meeting orthopedic surgery needs in the community and ensuring consistent coverage for patients needing emergency orthopedic care.” The goal for the acute orthopedic surgery program is to have a team of orthopedic surgeons, who are focused on providing care in the community 24/7, both to patients inside the hospital, as well as those who arrive in the Emergency Department needing orthopedic care. “Our acute orthopedic program is a great partnership that will help create a long-term, sustainable approach for meeting orthopedic surgery needs in the community and ensure consistent coverage for those patients needing emergency orthopedic care,” said Pamela Mehta, MD, Surgical Affiliates’ Chief of Orthopedic Surgery. “Up until now, community residents who have found themselves in need of urgent orthopedic care would have to find that care outside the community. Now, they will be able to have their care and procedures done right here at their local hospital.” In addition to Dr. Mehta, the local physician team for this new program includes Vincent Colin, MD, and Kerisimasi Reynolds, DO. The Surgical Affiliates’ model is based on leadership from expert surgeons and executives, building outstanding surgical teams that follow evidence-based guidelines in care delivery and collaboration with the hospital staff to consistently improve patient care and safety. As a result, there is increased physician and patient satisfaction, improved clinical outcomes, reduced length of stay and decreased costs per case. Surgical Affiliates Management Group is the first and only surgical hospitalist company with published, proven results that its programs improve patient care, lower costs, reduce readmissions and enhance hospital throughput. Surgical Affiliates’ System of Care© is a permanent solution to the challenge of providing integrated, 24/7 hospital-based surgical teams and one that raises the level of hospital performance across the board, preparing these facilities for the world of pay-for-performance and accountable care models. Surgical Affiliates provides trauma, orthopedic and acute care surgery programs in hospitals ranging from rural facilities to large community hospitals to multi-hospital systems. For more information, visit the Surgical Affiliates website at http://samgi.com.


WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - Feb 13, 2017) - DirectTrust today released for public comment a white paper containing more than 50 recommendations aimed at the more than 350 EHR vendors and HIT products' vendors that provide Direct Interoperability, urging them to significantly improve the usability of their products for secure, interoperable clinical messaging. The paper, "Feature and Function Recommendations to the HIT Industry to Optimize Clinician Usability of Direct Interoperability to Enhance Patient Care," was authored by a DirectTrust workgroup whose members are physicians and nurses with significant experience using Direct messaging to support health record sharing for care coordination and transitions of care. The paper contains recommendations to vendors for standardizing and enhancing their users' experience in handling both inbound and outbound Direct clinical messages, and for facilitating how the clinical information exchanged during care coordination is managed and used. The paper ranks the recommendations into three categories: Required/Urgently Needed Highly Desired and Advanced/Future Development. Examples of "Required" recommendations include: that EHR software send Direct messages in "real time", not in delayed or batch mode; that multiple, common structured and unstructured file formats can be attached to any Direct message; e.g. PDF, Word, CCDA; and that all EHR systems must be able to automate patient matching of incoming Direct messages for patients that already exist in the recipient EHR. "Sharing patients' clinical information across commonly-encountered boundaries of health IT systems is critically important to clinicians and their teams who are coordinating their patients' care across different providers and organizations," commented Steven Lane, MD, Clinical Informatics Director at Sutter Health and Co-Chair of the Clinicians Steering Workgroup. "Right now, in the typical medical community there is great diversity in the brands of EHRs and other health IT systems used by clinicians for Direct messaging. We're calling for all these vendors to make available more consistent and standardized software features to manage Direct clinical messages and their attachments. The existing variability in usability among different vendors' products is unacceptably high and poses a barrier to Direct interoperability, and thus to the adoption of secure messaging by clinicians to support common care coordination workflows." "In a community where high risk patients receive care from multiple clinicians associated with diverse organizations using different EHR systems, Direct interoperability can put critical clinical information in front of the physician inside their own EHR," said Holly Miller, MD, Co-Chair of the Workgroup and Chief Medical Officer at MedAllies. "This has been found to prevent patient adverse events and to be potentially lifesaving. Direct interoperability has provided basic connectivity. Now the HIT community needs to enhance usability, and address deficiencies and inconsistencies of messaging content and functionality." Dr. Miller continued, "Clinicians recognize the possibilities for clinical efficiencies through enhancements to their systems and are clamoring for these improvements. Our hope is that this white paper will be used to help EHR and other vendors understand what clinicians need to support safe, secure, efficient and cost effective patient care as patients transition across their medical neighborhoods. This is about standardizing software features and functions so clinical personnel can reliably do their jobs and deliver high value patient care." A copy of the white paper can be accessed here. Comments should be submitted to Admin@DirectTrust.org by March 30, 2017. About DirectTrust DirectTrust is a five-year old, non-profit, vendor neutral, self-regulatory entity initially created by and for participants in the Direct exchange community, including Health Internet Service Providers (HISPs), Certificate Authorities (CAs), Registration Authorities (RAs), doctors, patients and vendors. DirectTrust supports both provider-to-provider and patient-to-provider Direct exchange. In the period 2013 to 2015, DirectTrust was the recipient of a Cooperative Agreement Award from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) as part of the Exemplar HIE Governance Program. DirectTrust serves as a forum and governance body for persons and entities engaged in the Direct exchange of electronic health information as part of the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN). DirectTrust's Security and Trust Framework is the basis for the voluntary accreditation of service providers implementing Direct health information exchange. The goal of DirectTrust is to develop, promote, and, as necessary, help enforce the rules and best practices necessary to maintain security and trust within the Direct community, consistent with the HITECH Act and the governance rules for the NwHIN established by ONC. DirectTrust is committed to fostering widespread public confidence in the interoperable exchange of health information. To learn more, visit www.directtrust.org.


Next generation design enables hospitals to deliver more compassionate, standardized, patient-centered blood draws SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 27, 2017) -  Medical device innovator Velano Vascular announced today that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for PIVO™, its innovative needle-free vascular access device that seeks to improve the blood draw experience for patients while reducing risk to both patients and practitioners. Based on significant usage and input from practitioners, the new, improved device is designed for ease-of-use and high volume manufacturing. "The deliberate and thoughtful design inputs for the next generation of PIVO reflect our commitment to rapid product development cycles informed by real world experience in the country's leading health systems," said Velano Vascular Chief Executive Eric M. Stone. "Feedback from hundreds of practitioners already using our technology reinforced PIVO's ability to enhance the blood draw experience for patients and clinical staff, and helped us to develop a next generation product better suited for widespread adoption." PIVO is a single-use, disposable device that enables consistent, high quality blood samples from indwelling peripheral IV lines, allowing hospitals to reduce reliance on repeated needle sticks and central line access for blood collection. In addition to seeking a more compassionate care experience for patients, a safer environment for practitioners, and a more financially responsible alternative for health systems, PIVO aims to equip hospitals to better serve the increasing population of DVA (Difficult Venous Access) patients. "Our experience with PIVO illuminates that blood draws can be a painless, lower risk experience for patients and practitioners," explained Sutter Health Chief Nurse Officer Anna Kiger, DNP, D.Sc., MBA, R.N. "By further improving the usability and accessibility of this innovation, the potential exists for a global standard of more compassionate care." PIVO is currently in use at multiple health systems nationwide and will be available more broadly in 2017 following this FDA-clearance for the second generation PIVO solution. Frost & Sullivan awarded PIVO its New Product Innovation Award for Vascular Access in 2016. About Velano Vascular Velano Vascular is a medical device company committed to reducing the pain, risk, and inefficiencies of vascular access and blood collection practices. The company's revolutionary PIVO device enables needle-free blood draws directly from Peripheral IV catheters, aiming to enable more compassionate care for hospital inpatients, a safer practice for caregivers, and a more financially responsible alternative for health systems. Velano Vascular is backed by a series of well-respected investment firms, health systems, and dozens of health-industry veterans. Company collaborators include several of the leading hospital systems in the United States. More information is available at www.velanovascular.com and @velanovascular


Leader in Real-Time IT Analytics Positioned Furthest to the Right for Completeness of Vision SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - Feb 27, 2017) - ExtraHop, the leader in real-time IT analytics, today announced it has been recognized by Gartner, Inc. in the Visionaries quadrant of the "Magic Quadrant for Network Performance Monitoring and Diagnostics."1 "ExtraHop is honored to be recognized as a Visionary, furthest to the right of any vendor for Completeness of Vision," said Arif Kareem, CEO, ExtraHop. "We believe our placement in the Magic Quadrant acknowledges the differentiation of our approach, as well as the transformation occurring within IT. The era of infrastructure- and application-centric monitoring is over. The digital business era has arrived, and it requires real-time IT analytics." According to Gartner analysts Sanjit Ganguli and Vivek Bhalla, "For decades, the well-established practice of network management has enjoyed no shortage of available monitoring technologies, tools and vendors; however, the vast majority of those solutions, both acquired and implemented over the years, have been designed to support isolated, reactive resolution of availability issues by network specialists."2 ExtraHop delivers market-leading network performance monitoring, but that's just the beginning. ExtraHop has pioneered a fundamentally new way to observe and analyze digital interactions to support data-driven enterprises. With real-time analytics and machine learning, ExtraHop provides the most accurate and timely insight into performance, availability and security -- from infrastructure to the application to the cloud -- enabling IT teams to ensure seamless digital experience. "Our vision has always been bold: transform IT from an infrastructure-centric operation focused on components like servers and storage, to a data-driven one focused on outcomes," said Jesse Rothstein, co-founder and CTO of ExtraHop. "We feel our placement as a Visionary confirms our perspective: the future of performance monitoring is IT analytics." "Performance monitoring technologies were built to inform IT about infrastructure performance," said Ted Coons, General Partner at Technology Crossover Ventures (TCV) and ExtraHop Board Member. "ExtraHop has upended the market, delivering sophisticated analytics and machine learning that have transformed IT data into a powerful engine for the data-driven enterprise. The company's growth and expansion -- more than 50 percent year over year in 2016 -- put it on pace to be the next breakout player in IT analytics. We believe ExtraHop's position in the Gartner Magic Quadrant affirms that opportunity." "It comes as no surprise to see ExtraHop recognized by Gartner as a Visionary," said Wes Wright, CTO at Sutter Health. "I first used the platform at Seattle Children's Hospital, and it's now a central part of our IT operations at Sutter. ExtraHop gives us the real-time insight we need to keep our systems and applications up and running, and enables our entire organization -- from IT to clinicians -- to deliver better patient care and experience." In addition, Gartner recognized ExtraHop in its February 2017 Critical Capabilities for Network Performance Monitoring and Diagnostics, a companion document to the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for NPMD. Download your complimentary copy of the full Gartner Magic Quadrant and Critical Capabilities reports. Disclaimer: Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner's research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. About ExtraHop ExtraHop makes data-driven IT a reality. By applying real-time analytics and cloud-based machine learning to all digital interactions, ExtraHop delivers instant and unbiased insights. IT leaders turn to ExtraHop first to help them make faster, better-informed decisions that improve performance, security, and digital experience. Just ask the hundreds of global ExtraHop customers, including Sony, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Adobe, and Google. To experience the power of ExtraHop, explore our interactive online demo. Connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Company Will Showcase Solutions to Detect and Mitigate Ransomware and Deliver Complete Citrix Visibility in Support of the Real-Time Health System ORLANDO, FL--(Marketwired - Feb 20, 2017) - HIMSS17 - ExtraHop, the leader in real-time IT analytics, today announced its participation in HIMSS17. During the show, ExtraHop will be offering demonstrations of its Ransomware and Citrix solutions, which help leading healthcare organizations like Seattle Children's Hospital, Phoenix Children's Hospital, and Sutter Health deliver better patient care and experience. To see these solutions and learn more about how ExtraHop supports the real-time health system, visit booth #367 during the show. Behind every healthcare IT ticket is a patient whose care depends on the organization's ability to keep its systems running smoothly. ExtraHop applies real-time analytics and machine learning to deliver the most accurate and timely insight into the performance, availability, and security of every IT system. With this insight, healthcare IT teams can proactively detect problems and restore the performance of critical clinical systems before patient care and experience is impacted. Citrix performance and ransomware threats are two of the most critical issues faced by healthcare organizations today. The ExtraHop platform can detect and thwart against ransomware attacks in real time, as well as provide visibility across the Citrix ecosystem to guarantee fast Citrix delivery. About ExtraHop ExtraHop makes data-driven IT a reality. By applying real-time analytics and cloud-based machine learning to all digital interactions, ExtraHop delivers instant and unbiased insights. IT leaders turn to ExtraHop first to help them make faster, better-informed decisions that improve performance, security, and digital experience. Just ask the hundreds of global ExtraHop customers, including Sony, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Adobe, and Google. To experience the power of ExtraHop, explore our interactive online demo. Connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Physicians Medical Forum (PMF) aims to expand the pipeline and the number of African American/Black students who want to become physicians. PMF also provides a network of support that encourages medical students and residents to pursue their careers as physicians in the Oakland/San Francisco Northern California, Bay Area. PMF’s mission is to improve the delivery of culturally competent medical care to better meet the healthcare needs of the community-at-large. To that end, on Saturday, March 18th, the non-profit organization will host its Seven Annual "Doctors On Board Pipeline Program” (DOB), a day-long, tuition-free, information-filled series of workshops on admissions, exam prep, writing personal statements and mastering interviewing skills, and mentoring sessions with physicians that inspire the growth of African American/Black, Native American and other underrepresented minority students to attend medical schools and residency programs. Stalfana A. Bello, M.P.A., Physicians Medical Forum Executive Director, stated, "The Doctors On Board Pipeline Program is a one of a kind program that pulls together major resources to focus students on becoming physicians. The beauty of DOB is that almost all of the students will be the ‘First Generation’ in their families to become doctors or pharmacists." Dr. Albert L. Brooks, PMF President and Chief of Medical Services at Washington Hospital Healthcare System in Fremont, CA said, “Historically, African American/Black students have had limited access to higher education in the field of medicine. This remains to be a startling truth, even today. Doctors On Board provides students with their ‘first’ critically important steps towards successfully managing their exciting journey to becoming doctors.” Many of Northern California's most prominent physicians from medical schools in Northern California and nationwide, from Kaiser Permanente, the Sinkler Miller Medical Association and the Students National Medical Association (SNMA) Chapters from UCSF, UC Davis and Stanford Schools of Medicine and others will provide students with an innovative opportunity to explore varied facets of medicine and provide information about medical school preparation, specialties field, and life as a physician. Physicians Medical Forum is supported by The California Wellness Foundation, Kaiser Foundation Hospital Fund for Community Benefit Programs at the East Bay Community Foundation, San Francisco Foundation, Wells Fargo, and the National Medical Fellowships. Segments of the DOB Program will include: Students who wish to take part in this innovative, inter-active, one-day program may learn more and register by visiting http://www.PMFMD.com. Student Applications may be submitted online no later than 5:00 p.m., Friday, March 3, 2017. Parents, guardians and adult family member of students who are accepted into the program may also register at the website to attend the workshop, “Guide to Parents/Family of Future Doctors.” WHO:        Physicians Medical Forum (PMF) WHAT:            “Doctors On Board Pipeline Program” (Pre-medical Pipeline School Conference) WHEN:        Saturday, March 18, 2016 | 6:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.                         Registration & breakfast (6:30 A.M. – 7:30 A.M.); Workshops, mentoring, lunch, mock clinics (7:30 A.M.-4:00 P.M.);                                                                 Workshop: Guide for Parents/Family of Future Doctors (2:00 - 4:00 P.M.);                         Certificate of Completion Award Ceremony and Reception (4:00 - 5:00 P.M.) WHERE:    Claremont – A Fairmont Hotel | 41 Tunnel Road, Berkeley, CA Leading physicians, faculty, residents, medical students and business professionals will instruct, mentor and network with the program's student participants. They will include representatives from the PMF Board of Directors, Kaiser Permanente, Sinkler Miller Medical Association (SMMA), Student National Medical Association (SNMA), UCSF, UC Davis, and Stanford Schools of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Well Fargo, UCSF Office of Diversity and Outreach, Sutter Health, Washington Hospital Healthcare System, Highland Hospital and San Francisco General Hospital, US Navy Medical Service Corps (partial list). ABOUT PHYSICIANS MEDICAL FORUM (PMF): The Physicians Medical Forum is an Oakland, CA-based non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to encourage recruitment and retention of African American/Black physicians to eliminate health disparities; improve access to care; and maintain diversity within the profession, thereby, improving the quality of healthcare for the community overall. PMF programs and initiatives include: Community Health Ambassadors Internship Program; Doctors Rock Workshop Series on Mentoring, Exam Prep, Interview/Personal Statement Skills Clinics; Physicians mentoring and networking events, studies on physicians’ retention and recruitment; Visiting Elective/Visiting Clerkship Resident Scholarships, physician education and development; providing scholarships for medical students and residents; networking with legislators and medical organizations; and community outreach programs. EDITORS: The following “Doctors On Board Pipeline Program” participants are immediately available for pre-event interviews:

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