Sacramento, CA, United States
Sacramento, CA, United States

Sutter Health is a not-for-profit health system in Northern California, headquartered in Sacramento. It includes doctors, hospitals and other health care services in more than 100 Northern California cities and towns. Major service lines of Sutter Health-affiliated hospitals include cardiac care, women’s and children’s services, cancer care, orthopedics and advanced patient safety technology. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Through the partnership, Sutter Health and the Steinberg Institute will help to enhance and expand One Mind at Work's engagement with major employers across sectors, industries, and national boundaries. This will include developing and providing quality education and training resources; policy, legislative, and best practice advocacy; connections between employers and providers; and a community of practice for employers committed to systems change in their own organizations and the external environment. Together, these efforts address the immense societal and business costs of mental health conditions, which are projected to drain $16 trillion in economic output by 2030. "Through this game-changing partnership, our two organizations will join One Mind at Work and its existing partners to take action, empower employers to more effectively address workplace mental health, and make a difference in a coordinated way," said Sarah Krevans, President and CEO of Sutter Health. "As a healthcare employer, Sutter Health knows firsthand the hurdles organizations and employees face — from stigma to barriers to service — and we look forward to sharing our ongoing efforts and experiences in creating a healthier workforce." "We're excited to be part of an effort that seeks to normalize discussion of mental health in the workplace," said Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg, who founded the Steinberg Institute with the goal of making mental health care a public policy priority in the U.S. "Our aim is to ensure brain health is given the same attention as physical health when it comes to prevention, intervention, and treatment." The organizations will participate in an event on September 13 and 14, 2017 in Napa, California: "One Mind at Work — Launching A Global Movement." The event will convene Fortune 100 executives, leading academic experts in mental health, and representatives from national and international health organizations. Topics will include a gold standard for workplace mental health best practices, the business case for mental health, addressing provider shortages and access barriers, and tech-enabled approaches to brain health. One Mind Institute is a public nonprofit organization committed to improving lives globally by raising awareness, supporting innovative services, and funding open science to find preventions and cures for all brain illnesses. Contributions to One Mind Institute and its affiliate, One Mind, have resulted in over $260 million for research, changed thousands of lives, and funded stunning discoveries for better therapies now and tomorrow. https://www.onemindinstitute.org/ Founded by Sacramento Mayor and former State Senate President pro Tempore Darrell Steinberg, the Steinberg Institute is a leading nonprofit public policy institute that supports and encourages effective and comprehensive mental health public policymaking; helps solve disputes between mental health stakeholders; engages business leaders and other non-traditional stakeholders; evaluates the impact of current investments; and implements a bold, best-practices vision to advance mental health services and support integrated systems of care. http://steinberginstitute.org/ Sutter Health was named one of the nation's top five large health systems in 2016 thanks to its integrated network of physician, employee and volunteer pioneers—more than 60,000 people strong. Rooted in Sutter Health's not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support and learn from the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter pioneers adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for people experiencing homelessness, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to smart glass technology, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their medical journey. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/trailblazing-partnership-to-galvanize-workplace-mental-health-efforts-300454030.html


Gabrielle Sulzberger Appointed New Chair of the Board; Mary Ellen Coe Appointed New Chair of Nominating & Governance Committee New Directors Provide Retail, Financial and Leadership Expertise and Track Records Creating Value for Shareholders AUSTIN, Texas, May 10, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Whole Foods Market, Inc. (NASDAQ:WFM) (“Whole Foods Market” or “the Company”) today announced a significant refreshment of its Board of Directors by appointing five new independent directors, effective immediately: Ken Hicks; Joe Mansueto; Sharon McCollam; Scott Powers; and Ron Shaich. The Company also announced that Gabrielle Sulzberger has been appointed the new Chair of the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors and Mary Ellen Coe has been appointed the new Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee. Gabrielle Sulzberger has served as an independent director of the Company since 2003. Ms. Sulzberger’s years serving on public company boards and experience as a chief financial officer provide Whole Foods Market with financial, M&A and risk assessment expertise. Most recently and since December 2016, Ms. Sulzberger served as Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee of the Whole Foods Market Board. Mary Ellen Coe joined the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors in November 2016 and has served on the Nominating & Governance Committee and has assisted Ms. Sulzberger throughout the Board refreshment process. As an executive at Google, Ms. Coe brings deep technology expertise in marketing, digital strategy and brand strategy. These appointments are part of Whole Food Market’s Board Succession and Development Plan, a robust refreshment process designed to help ensure that the Company’s Board has the best mix of skills and experience necessary to support Whole Foods Market’s leadership team in accelerating shareholder value creation. With these changes, the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors will comprise 12 directors, 10 of whom are independent and six of whom were added in the last seven months. The average tenure of the new Board will be seven years. The new Board includes nine directors who are current or former CEOs or CFOs and four female directors. Collectively, the Whole Foods Market Board brings a broad range of leadership, retail, technology, finance, risk management and M&A experience, as well as valuable shareholder perspective. “With today’s additions to the Board, and changes in our Board’s leadership, we are well positioned as we enter the next phase of our evolution,” said John Mackey, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Whole Foods Market. “We believe that we have the right plan – and the right team – to execute on our initiatives at an aggressive pace, deliver results and enhance value for our shareholders.” “The five new independent directors have distinguished track records as value creators and as experienced leaders,” said Gabrielle Sulzberger, Chair of the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors. “Our new directors join a Board that is focused on being responsive to our shareholders and is committed to achieving the significant opportunities ahead. Since becoming the Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee, I have been leading the Board’s succession and development plans alongside my fellow directors. On behalf of the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors, I look forward to working with Ken, Joe, Sharon, Scott and Ron as we work to improve financial and operational performance, and deliver our value enhancement strategy.” Ms. Sulzberger continued, “On behalf of the Board, I want to thank the departing directors for their many contributions to Whole Foods Market over the years. The change that is underway would not have been possible without the leadership of these directors and their commitment to making Whole Foods Market what it is today. It is a testament to their service as directors that they chose to step down and make way for the new directors joining the Board. Each and every one of these departing directors has our deep gratitude and admiration.” Following the refreshment, the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors will include: Gabrielle Sulzberger, Chair of the Board; Mary Ellen Coe, Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee; Shahid (Hass) Hassan, Chair of the Compensation Committee; Jonathan Seiffer, Chair of the Audit Committee; Ken Hicks; Stephanie Kugelman; John Mackey; Joe Mansueto; Sharon McCollam; Scott Powers; Walter Robb; and Ron Shaich. Accelerated Value Enhancement Plan and New CFO In separate press releases issued today, Whole Foods Market detailed its accelerated path to shareholder value creation and quarterly earnings and announced Keith Manbeck as its new Chief Financial Officer. Ken C. Hicks is the former Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Foot Locker, a major athletic apparel retailer. Mr. Hicks has over 29 years of experience in the retail industry formerly serving as President and Chief Merchandising Officer of J.C. Penney from 2005 to 2009, as well as serving as a member of its Board of Directors from 2008 to 2009. From 2002 to 2004 he was J.C. Penney’s President and Chief Operating Officer of Stores and Merchandise Operations. Prior to joining J.C. Penney, Mr. Hicks was President of Payless ShoeSource. He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy and holds an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. He has served on the Board of Directors of Avery Dennison Corporation since 2007. Joe Mansueto founded Morningstar in 1984 and became Executive Chairman in 2017. He has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors for the duration of his tenure, and as Chief Executive Officer from 1984 to 1996 and again from 2000 to 2016. He received the Distinguished Entrepreneurial Alumnus Award from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business in 2000. Before founding Morningstar, Mr. Mansueto was a securities analyst at Harris Associates. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in business administration from the University of Chicago and a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He previously served as a Director of TransUnion Corp. Sharon L. McCollam most recently served as Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Best Buy, from 2012 to 2017. In this role, Ms. McCollam has been broadly recognized as the co-pilot of the company's Renew Blue transformation. Ms. McCollam previously served as Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Williams-Sonoma, Inc. and in 2010 was appointed to the Board of Directors. She retired from the company in 2012. Prior to her time at Williams-Sonoma, Ms. McCollam served as Chief Financial Officer of Dole Fresh Vegetables Inc. from 1996 to 2000. She currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of Hallmark Cards, Inc. Stitch Fix, Art.com, and Sutter Health. Ms. McCollam previously served on the Boards of Directors for Williams-Sonoma, Del Monte Foods and OfficeMax Incorporated. Ms. McCollam received a Bachelor of Science in accounting from the University of Central Oklahoma and is a Certified Public Accountant. Mr. Powers held leadership positions at State Street Corporation from 2008 to 2015, most recently as Executive Vice President of State Street Corp. and President and Chief Executive Officer of State Street Global Advisors. He previously served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Old Mutual USA and Old Mutual Asset Management from 2001 to 2008. He also held executive roles at Mellon Financial Corporation and Boston Company Asset Management. Mr. Powers is a member of the Board of Directors of Sun Life Financial, Inc., where he serves on the Governance, Nomination & Investment Committee and the Management Resources Committee. Mr. Powers is also a member of the Board of Directors of The PulteGroup, where he serves as a member of the Nominating and Governance Committee and the Compensation and Management Development Committee. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in economics from Harvard College. Mr. Shaich is the Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Panera Bread Company, which established the high-growth fast-casual restaurant segment, as well as the Founder of Au Bon Pain, which established the bakery-cafe segment. He serves as President of the Panera Bread Foundation and spearheaded the Panera Cares initiative, through which the Foundation creates nonprofit community cafes aimed at addressing issues related to food insecurity. Mr. Shaich received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Clark University and a Master of Business Administration degree from Harvard Business School. He is also the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Clark University. Ms. Sulzberger has served as a Principal of a diversified investment fund, Rustic Canyon/Fontis Partners, LP, since its inception in October 2005. In addition, Ms. Sulzberger served as Chief Financial Officer of the Villanueva Companies, a private holding company with diverse investment interests, from 2002 through 2005. Ms. Sulzberger also serves on the boards of directors of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Brixmor Property Group Inc. Ms. Sulzberger served on the board of directors of Stage Stores, Inc. until June 2015. Ms. Coe serves as President of Google Marketing Solutions, overseeing the global mid-market and small advertiser business which serves millions of customers and agencies worldwide. Her teams include sales and support for this high-growth segment as well as acquisition of new advertisers and channel partners for AdWords. Prior to this role she served as Vice President Global Sales Operations and Strategy for Google's global business organization supporting the large client advertising sales, services and publisher businesses. Before joining Google in 2012, Mary Ellen was a Partner with McKinsey & Company from 2000-2012 serving leading consumer and retail companies and led the North America Consumer Marketing practice. Earlier in her career, she worked at the Leo Burnett Company on the Procter and Gamble beauty care portfolio, and worked in Product Management in the durable goods industry at Haworth. Ms. Coe completed graduate studies at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and completed her bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan. Founded in 1978 in Austin, Texas, Whole Foods Market is the leading natural and organic foods supermarket, the first national “Certified Organic” grocer, and uniquely positioned as America’s Healthiest Grocery Store™.  In fiscal year 2016, the Company had sales of approximately $16 billion and has more than 460 stores in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.  Whole Foods Market employs approximately 87,000 team members and has been ranked for 20 consecutive years as one of the “100 Best Companies to Work For” in America by Fortune magazine.  For more information, please visit www.wholefoodsmarket.com or @wholefoods on Twitter.


"The cooperation between the three nonprofits – T3 Charities, 21 Strong and Practice Like Pros – has been amazing, and the fantastic response from members of the NFL is heart-warming knowing they are supportive of our cause," said Jeffrey R. Jenkins, M.D., chief medical executive of Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital. "I am also grateful to all of our sponsors for helping bring this issue to the greater public. Because of this spirit of cooperation, we will be able to make a huge difference in the knowledge about detection, prevention and treatment of traumatic brain injuries among high school athletes." The tournament is hosted by the family of 17-year-old Toran Maronic of Bear River High School in Grass Valley, who was a college prospect in football and lacrosse. In June 2016, the wide receiver was brain-injured during a 7-on-7 scrimmage. Specialists believed Toran would never come out of his coma or fully recover, but he did and is now awaiting clearance to pursue playing lacrosse again. He became the first patient enrolled in groundbreaking scientific research on "second-impact syndrome" among high school football players. Proceeds of the tournament will go to the research project, which is being conducted by Robert C. Cantu, M.D., co-founder of the Concussion Legacy Foundation in Boston. The research is sponsored by Practice Like Pros, which encourages high school football programs to hold practices like the NFL does. According to the group, just 2½ percent of NFL injuries happen during practices, while 58 percent of high school injuries occur at practice. Former Oakland Raiders greats Jim Plunkett, Ted Kwalick, Daryle Lamonica, Phil Villapiano, Rod Martin and Charles Woodson are among the three-dozen sports celebrities participating in the golf tournament. Every player who signs up will be in a five-some captained by one of the celebrities. Entry and sponsorship fees are tax-deductible. "We have no overhead, and our organizers are all volunteers," said tournament host and Toran's father, David Maronic. "Every dime will go to our charities." The event begins Friday, June 16, with a pairing party hosted by Charles Woodson Wines at Thunder Valley Casino Resort, with the golfing at Whitney Oaks on Saturday, June 17. That evening, the event returns to Thunder Valley with cocktails, awards and an auction of football memorabilia and other items. To sign up for the event as a player or sponsor, go to www.T3charities.events/golf-event.html. For more information on the tournament or sponsorships, email David Maronic at toranmaronic@aol.com or call (510) 693-9566. Sutter Health was named one of the nation's top five large health systems in 2016 thanks to its integrated network of physician, employee and volunteer pioneers—more than 60,000 people strong. Rooted in Sutter Health's not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care. For more information about the Sutter Health network visit sutterhealth.org. T3 Charities, a foundation in support of Bear River High School's Toran Maronic, is dedicated to helping local families in need. Visit www.T3charities.events. 21 Strong Foundation was formed after a November 2016 traumatic brain injury suffered by a player at The Woodlands High School in Texas. It provides assistance nationwide to families affected by such tragedies. See www.21strongfoundation.org. Practice Like Pros is a national movement to reduce needless injury in high school football, endorsed by Mike Ditka, Archie Manning, Tony Dorsett, Ronnie Lott, Warren Moon, Anthony Munoz and dozens of other progressive minds from football and medical science. Visit www.practicelikepros.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sutter-health-sponsors-celebrity-golf-classic-benefiting-football-brain-injury-research-300461646.html


ARMONK, N.Y., May 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A team of scientists at IBM (NYSE: IBM) Research, in collaboration with scientists from Sutter Health, recently completed research developing methods to help predict heart failure based on hidden clues in Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Ove...


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Hall of Famer Willie Brown, Jim Plunkett, Daryle Lamonica, Charles Woodson, Phil Villapiano, Rod Martin and several more Oakland Raiders headline a dazzling field of sports stars for the first Game Changer Celebrity Golf Classic, June 16-17 at Whitney Oaks Golf Club in Rocklin, Calif. Proceeds will fund the first-ever scientific research of catastrophic brain injury among adolescent football players. “Every fivesome will be captained by a celebrity, so every golfer will play with one of these sports stars,” said Tournament Director Dave Maronic. “Entry and sponsorship fees are 100 percent tax-deductible because expenses are covered by our title sponsor, Sutter Health. We have no overhead, and organizers are all volunteers. Every dime will go to our charities.” Maronic is the father of Toran Maronic, a standout football/lacrosse athlete at Bear River High School in Grass Valley who a suffered traumatic brain injury last June during a 7-on-7 football scrimmage. Toran has since made a miraculous recovery and is awaiting clearance to play lacrosse. His was the first case consented into the scientific research now being conducted by Dr. Robert C. Cantu of Boston and teams of researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Md., and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. “The Maronics are an amazing family,” said Terry O’Neil, Founder/CEO of Practice Like Pros, a collaborator in the scientific research. “Toran has become an inspirational speaker with a dramatic story to tell. He and his mother, Cortney, visit boys around the country who have suffered serious brain injury. And his father, Dave, is determined to pay back the support shown during Toran’s crisis.” The Maronics’ newly formed foundation, T3 Charities, is presenting sponsor of the golf event, along with Practice Like Pros and the 21 Strong Foundation of The Woodlands in Houston. To participate in the Game Changer Celebrity Golf Classic as a player or sponsor, go to http://www.t3charities.events/golf-event.html or call Dave Maronic at 510-693-9566 or e-mail him at toranmaronic(at)aol(dot)com. Exclusive features for participants include: Here are the Raiders playing in the tournament: In addition, there are several other NFL greats and other sports stars playing, including: Sutter Health is an integrated network of physician, employee and volunteer pioneers – more than 60,000 people strong. Rooted in Sutter Health’s not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. Sutter pioneers adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. For more information about the Sutter network, visit http://www.sutterhealth.org. T3 Charities is a foundation dedicated to helping local families in need. See http://www.T3charities.events. 21 Strong Foundation was formed after a November, 2016, traumatic brain injury suffered by a player at The Woodlands, Tx., High School. It provides direct assistance nationwide to families afflicted by such tragedies. See http://www.21strongfoundation.org. Practice Like Pros is a national movement to reduce needless injury in high school football, endorsed by Mike Ditka, Archie Manning, Tony Dorsett, Ronnie Lott, Warren Moon, Anthony Munoz and dozens of other progressive minds from football and medical science. See http://www.practicelikepros.com.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

For Some, Pre-Hospice Care Can Be A Good Alternative To Hospitals Gerald Chinchar, a Navy veteran who loves TV Westerns, isn't quite at the end of his life, but the end is probably not far away. The 77-year-old's medications fill a dresser drawer, and congestive heart failure puts him at high risk of emergency room visits and long hospital stays. He fell twice last year, shattering his hip and femur, and now gets around his San Diego home in a wheelchair. Above all, Chinchar hopes to avoid another long stint in the hospital. He still likes to go watch his grandchildren's sporting events and play blackjack at the casino. "If they told me I had six months to live, or [could instead] go to the hospital and last two years, I'd say leave me home," he said. "That ain't no trade for me." Most aging people would choose to stay home in their last years of life. But for many, it doesn't work out: They go in and out of hospitals, getting treated for flare-ups of various chronic illnesses. It's a massive problem that costs the health care system billions of dollars and has galvanized health providers, hospital administrators and policymakers to search for solutions. Sharp HealthCare, the San Diego health system where Chinchar receives care, has devised a way to fulfill his wishes and reduce costs at the same time. It's a pre-hospice program called Transitions, designed to give elderly patients the care they want at home and keep them out of the hospital. Social workers and nurses from Sharp regularly visit patients in their homes to explain what they can expect in their final years, help them make end-of-life plans and teach them how to better manage their diseases. Physicians track their health and scrap unnecessary medications. Unlike hospice care, patients in this program don't need to have a prognosis of six months or less to live, and they can continue getting treatment that is aimed at curing their illnesses, not just treating symptoms. Before the Transitions program started, the only option for many patients in a health crisis was to call 911 and be rushed to the emergency room. Now, they can get round-the-clock access to nurses, one phone call away. "Transitions is for just that point where people are starting to realize they can see the end of the road," said Dr. Dan Hoefer, a San Diego palliative care and family practice physician, and one of the creators of the program. "We are trying to help them through that process," he said, "so it's not filled with chaos." The importance of programs like Transitions is likely to grow in coming years as 10,000 baby boomers — many with multiple chronic diseases — turn 65 every day. Transitions was among the first of its kind, but several such programs, formally known as home-based palliative care, have since opened around the country. They are part of a broader push to improve people's health and reduce spending through better coordination of care and more treatment outside hospital walls. But a huge barrier stands in the way of pre-hospice programs: There is no clear way to pay for them. Health providers typically get paid for office visits and procedures, and hospitals still get reimbursed for patients in their beds. The services provided by home-based palliative care don't fit that model. In recent years, however, pressure has mounted to continue moving away from traditional payment systems. The Affordable Care Act has established new rules and pilot programs that reward the quality of care, rather than the quantity. Those changes are helping to make home-based palliative care a more viable option. In San Diego, Sharp's palliative care program has a strong incentive to reduce the cost of caring for its patients, who are all in Medicare managed care. The nonprofit health organization receives a fixed amount of money per member each month, so it can pocket what it doesn't spend on hospital stays and other costly medical interventions. Palliative care focuses on relieving patients' stress, pain and other symptoms as their health declines, and it helps them maintain their quality of life. It's for people with serious illnesses, such as cancer, dementia and heart failure. The idea is for patients to get palliative care and then move into hospice care, but they don't always make that transition. The 2014 report "Dying in America," by the Institute of Medicine, recommended that all people with serious advanced illness have access to palliative care. Many hospitals now have palliative care programs, delivered by teams of social workers, chaplains, doctors and nurses, for patients who aren't yet ready for hospice. But until recently, few such efforts had opened beyond the confines of hospitals. Kaiser Permanente set out to address this gap nearly 20 years ago, creating a home-based palliative care program that it tested in California and later in Hawaii and Colorado. Two studies by Kaiser and others found that participants were far more likely to be satisfied with their care and more likely to die at home than those not in the program. (Kaiser Health News is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.) One of the studies, published in 2007, found that 36 percent of people receiving palliative care at home were hospitalized in their final months, compared with 59 percent of those getting standard care. The overall cost of care for those who participated in the program was a third less than for those who didn't. "We thought, 'Wow. We have something that works,'" said Susan Enguidanos, an associate professor of gerontology at the University of Southern California's Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, who worked on both studies. "Immediately we wanted to go and change the world." But Enguidanos knew that Kaiser Permanente was unlike most health organizations. It was responsible for both insuring and treating its patients, so it had a clear financial motivation to improve care and control costs. Enguidanos said she talked to medical providers around the nation about this type of palliative care, but the concept didn't take off at the time. Providers kept asking the same question: How do you pay for it without charging patients or insurers? "I liken it to paddling out too soon for the wave," she said. "We were out there too soon. ... But we didn't have the right environment, the right incentive." Hoefer is a former hospice and home health medical director and has spent years treating elderly patients. He learned an important lesson when seeing patients in his office: Despite the medical care they received, "they were far more likely to be admitted to the hospital than make it back to see me." When his patients were hospitalized, many would decline quickly. Even if their immediate symptoms were treated successfully, they would sometimes leave the hospital less able to take care of themselves. They would get infections or suffer from delirium. Some would fall. Hoefer's colleague, Suzi Johnson, a nurse and administrator in Sharp's hospice program, saw the opposite side of the equation. Patients admitted into hospice care would make surprising turnarounds once they stopped going to the hospital and started getting medical and social support at home, instead. Some lived longer than doctors had expected. In 2005, the pair hatched a bold idea: What if they could design a home-based program for patients before they were eligible for hospice? Thus, Transitions was born. They modeled their new program in part on the Kaiser experiment, then set out to persuade doctors, medical directors and financial officers to try it. But they met resistance from physicians and hospital administrators who were used to getting paid for seeing patients. "We were doing something that was really revolutionary, that really went against the culture of health care at the time," Johnson said. "We were inspired by the broken system and the opportunity we saw to fix something." Despite the concerns, Sharp's foundation board gave the pair a $180,000 grant to test out Transitions. And in 2007, they started with heart failure patients and later expanded the program to those with advanced cancer, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other progressive illnesses. They started to win over some doctors who appreciated having additional eyes on their patients, but they still encountered "some skepticism about whether it was really going to do any good for our patients," said Dr. Jeremy Hogan, a neurologist with Sharp. "It wasn't really clear to the group ... what the purpose of providing a service like this was." Nevertheless, Hogan referred some of his dementia patients to the program and quickly realized that the extra support for them and their families meant fewer panicked calls and emergency room trips. Hoefer said doctors started realizing home-based care made sense for these patients — many of whom were too frail to get to a doctor's office regularly. "At this point in the patient's life, we should be bringing health care to the patient, not the other way around," he said. Across the country, more doctors, hospitals and insurers are starting to see the value of home-based palliative care, said Kathleen Kerr, a health care consultant who researches palliative care. "It is picking up steam," she said. "You know you are going to take better care of this population, and you are absolutely going to have lower health care costs." Providers are motivated in part by a growing body of research. Two studies of Transitions in 2013 and 2016 reaffirmed that such programs save money. The second study, led by outside evaluators, showed it saved more than $4,200 per month on cancer patients and nearly $3,500 on those with heart failure. The biggest differences occurred in the final two months of life, said one of the researchers, Brian Cassel, who is palliative care research director at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond. Nurse Sheri Juan and social worker Mike Velasco, who both work for Sharp, walked up a wooden ramp to the Chinchars' front door one recent January morning. Juan rolled a small suitcase behind her containing a blood pressure cuff, a stethoscope, books, a laptop computer and a printer. Late last year, Gerald Chinchar's doctor recommended he enroll in Transitions, explaining that his health was in a "tenuous position." Chinchar has nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. He has had breathing problems much of his life, suffering from asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — ailments he partly attributes to the four decades he spent painting and sandblasting fuel tanks for work. Chinchar also recently learned he had heart failure. "I never knew I had any heart trouble," he said. "That was the only good thing I had going for me." Now he's trying to figure out how to keep it from getting worse: How much should he drink? What is he supposed to eat? That's where Juan comes in. Her job is to make sure the Chinchars understand Gerald's disease so he doesn't have a flare-up that could send him to the emergency room. She sat beside the couple in their living room and asked a series of questions: Any pain today? How is your breathing? Juan checked his blood pressure and examined his feet and legs for signs of more swelling. She looked through his medications and told him which ones the doctor wanted him to stop taking. "What we like to do as a palliative care program is streamline your medication list," she told him. "They may be doing more harm than good." His wife, Mary Jo Chinchar, said she appreciates the visits, especially the advice about what Gerald should eat and drink. Her husband doesn't always listen to her, she said. "It's better to come from somebody else." Outpatient palliative care programs are cropping up in various forms. Some new ones are run by insurers, others by health systems or hospice organizations. Others are for-profit, including Aspire Health, which was started by former senator Bill Frist in 2013. Sutter Health operates a project called Advanced Illness Management to help patients manage symptoms and medications and plan for the future. The University of Southern California and Blue Shield of California recently received a $5 million grant to provide and study outpatient care. "The climate has changed for palliative care," said Enguidanos, the lead investigator on the USC-Blue Shield project. Ritchie said she expects even more home-based programs in the years to come. "My expectation is that much of what is being done in the hospital won't need to be done in the hospital anymore and it can be done in people's homes," she said. Challenges remain, however. Some doctors are unfamiliar with the approach, and patients may be reluctant, especially those who haven't clearly been told they have a terminal diagnosis. Now, some palliative care providers and researchers worry about the impact of President Donald Trump's plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act and revamp Medicare — efforts that seem to be back in play. Gerald Chinchar, who grew up in Connecticut, said he never expected to live into old age. In his family, Chinchar said, "you're an old-timer if you make 60." Chinchar said he gave up drinking and is trying to eat less of his favorite foods — steak sandwiches and fish and chips. He just turned 77, a milestone he credits partly to the pre-hospice program. "If I make 80, I figured I did pretty good," he said. "And if I make 80, I'll shoot for 85." This story is part of NPR's partnership with Kaiser Health News. KHN is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. You can follow Anna Gorman on Twitter: @annagorman.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A sign on a restaurant informs customers that the facility is closed due to a power cut, in the financial district of San Francisco, California, U.S. April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A power outage triggered by a fire in a utility substation blacked out much of San Francisco on Friday, paralyzing the city's technology and finance center, halting its famed cable cars and shuttering major retailers. The utility PG&E Corp reported a fire and a circuit-breaker failure at a San Francisco substation, with a series of outages hitting the Bay Area city shortly after 9 a.m. (noon ET/1600 GMT) and ultimately cutting power to some 90,000 customers. Office workers in the city's financial district spilled out onto the sidewalks, wandering the streets in search of an open cafe, or stood waiting in the lobbies of their buildings as elevators came to a stop. "It's pretty big, seems like half the city has no power," said King Lip, chief investment officer at Baker Avenue Asset Management in San Francisco. "We were in the middle of a trade." Fourteen neighborhoods were affected, including the main shopping district near Union Square, where stores and coffee shops turns signs to closed and major retailers such as Macy's and Louis Vuitton shut their doors. In a city proud of its technological prowess, the outage forced residents back to the dark ages. At the salad bar chain MIXT downtown, cashiers took credit card payments using old-fashioned paper imprints, as customers lined up to eat in the dim natural light. "Old school," commented patron Ben Fackler. "I haven't seen that in forever." By 3 p.m. electricity had been restored to less than a third of the affected customers and PG&E spokesman Paul Doherty said that it would be several more hours before the rest would be brought back online. "Workers have entered the substation. They're assessing the damage and starting to make repairs,” Doherty said. San Francisco International Airport remained operational, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said through a spokesperson that the agency had not received any reports indicating that the outage was related to any security or terrorism incident. The spokesperson requested anonymity, citing department policy. "This had nothing to do with cyber," said Joe Weiss, an expert on control system cyber security who has testified to Congress about structural weaknesses in grid components. "The real question is how could one substation take out, effectively, San Francisco? What other failures occurred there that didn’t isolate this?" Wells Fargo & Co closed 13 bank branches and four office buildings, while the New York Stock Exchange said its ARCA options trading floor in San Francisco was briefly unavailable because of the power outage. For more than two hours, trains streamed through the Montgomery Street station as the outage prevented them from stopping until backup generators came on line at about 11:30 a.m., Bay Area Rapid Transit said. At Saint Francis Memorial Hospital in the Nob Hill neighborhood, all non-essential appointments and procedures had been canceled, spokeswoman Blair Holloway said. Two of four campuses of Sutter Health's California Pacific Medical Center were also impacted by the outage, spokesman Dean Fryer said. Elective surgeries were canceled and emergency patients were directed to other hospitals, Fryer said.


As part of this transformative gift, Sutter Health will name the lobby of its Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) San Carlos Center in honor of Michael and Judith Gaulke. In addition, Sutter will name its PAMF Palo Alto Center after the Gaulkes in a formal ceremony in the fall. Sutter's Innovation Hatchery tests promising ideas during 90-day sprints in hospitals and clinics. It focuses on solutions in five key areas: primary care, mothers and babies, mental health, compassionate hospitalization and end-of-life care. The Innovation Hatchery's swift process and unique approach allows for quicker implementation of practices that can benefit patients in real-time and that can shape their experiences for the better. Sutter Health aims to revolutionize healthcare by making it simpler, engaging and more human. Led by Sutter's first-ever Chief Innovation Officer Chris Waugh, the healthcare network embraces a human-centered design approach that sets out to develop new product and service experiences, forge strategic partnerships with cutting-edge startups and technology companies, and help create a culture of innovation across the organization. Patients benefit from recent partnerships with Augmedix, OpenIDEO, Lyft and Velano Vascular: The Gaulkes are longtime Sutter Health Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) patients and advocates. They are cancer survivors, and as a result, healthcare has a personal meaning to them both. Michael serves on the PAMF Community Board of Trustees and is currently the Chair of the Sutter Health Board of Trustees. His experience as Chair of Exponent, Inc., an engineering and scientific consulting firm, will bring ideas from Silicon Valley and tech in general to impact the delivery of healthcare. Judy has a passion for healthcare as well, devoting her time and energy to women's health issues. "Judy and I made this gift to Sutter Health because we wholeheartedly believe in what the Hatchery is doing to marry promising innovations with what patients need most," Gaulke said. "It's going to take the kind of innovative breakthroughs that come to life every day in Northern California to make a difference in healthcare, and we believe in Sutter's approach to 'hatching' new ideas to improve care quality and access for the better. Judy and I are incredibly optimistic. We believe that investing today will increase our chances of seeing significant change in healthcare tomorrow, so that there is real progress in our lifetime." About Sutter Health Sutter Health is one of the nation's top five large health systems thanks to its integrated network of physician, employee and volunteer pioneers—more than 60,000 people strong. Rooted in Sutter Health's not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support and learn from the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter pioneers adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to smart glass technology, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their medical journey. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/20-million-gift-establishes-michael-and-judith-gaulke-innovation-hatchery-endowment-fund-at-sutter-health-300471538.html


News Article | June 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Our doctors and Sutter care teams continually focus on thinking ahead, learning and innovating to meet the needs of our patients and make them feel supported," said Jeff Burnich, M.D., senior vice president of Sutter Health's Medical and Market Networks. "We're proud of our efforts to improve quality, safety and accessibility, and to provide meaningful care to those we serve in Northern California." Physician organizations voluntarily participate in CAPG's Standards of Excellence™ survey. This year, 140 medical groups—covering more than 17 million patients nationwide— took part in the evaluation. The survey ratings, which assess medical group performance in six rigorous categories, help consumers evaluate a physician group's technical quality, patient experience and affordability. "Our Standards of Excellence™ survey is recognized as the industry standard by which the nation's healthcare systems can assess the delivery of accountable and value-based care and improve patient care coordination, in line with the nation's movement towards alternative payment models," said Donald Crane, CAPG President and CEO. For complete survey results and additional information, visit capg.org/soe. Sutter Health was named one of the nation's top five large health systems in 2016 thanks to its integrated network of physician, employee and volunteer pioneers—more than 60,000 people strong. Rooted in Sutter Health's not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support and learn from the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter pioneers adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to smart glass technology, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their medical journey. For more information about the Sutter Health network visit: sutterhealth.org | facebook.com/sutterhealth | youtube.com/sutterhealth | twitter.com/sutterhealth. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sutter-health-physician-organizations-earn-elite-honors-300479163.html


News Article | June 13, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SACRAMENTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sutter Health, a not-for-profit health care system in Northern California, and Aetna (NYSE: AET) today announced plans to launch a jointly owned health plan. This new collaboration, the first of its kind in Northern California, will bring together Sutter Health’s network of nationally recognized, high-quality doctors and hospitals with Aetna’s leading health plan expertise, cutting-edge data, analytics and health information technology, and shared care management capabilities. This joint venture will deliver a differentiated, personalized experience for members and is designed to help lower the cost of care, resulting in competitively priced products. Sutter Health and Aetna anticipate offering self-insured commercial products starting mid-2018 in the greater Sacramento, Central Valley and Bay Area communities, as well as fully insured PPO products to follow in early 2019, pending regulatory approval. This new company will complement Sutter Health’s and Aetna’s current products by providing more choices to Northern California’s commercially and self-insured populations. By equally sharing ownership and accountability, Sutter Health and Aetna aim to integrate the continuum of care delivery, from wellness to disease management, care coordination, and access. The joint venture will also streamline administrative services for members. This new approach to care management will focus on enhancing member engagement through combined data analytics that identify at-risk patients sooner and provides them with earlier access to care by expanding access to alternative sites of care, and using advanced population health technology to help members better manage chronic and other health conditions. “We are excited to partner with Sutter Health on this joint venture,” said Mike Bahr, Aetna’s senior vice president of local markets and territories. “With Sutter Health, we believe we have found a strong partner that shares our vision to transform health care in Northern California by providing members with a simpler, more personal experience.” Through this new relationship, Sutter Health and Aetna will work together to integrate health care and insurance coverage that provides members with the services they need as quickly and efficiently as possible. “Patients benefit when providers and health plans share resources and work together,” says Phil Jackson, Sutter Health’s CEO of Health Plan Products. “Our Sutter Health and Aetna insurance product offerings will provide employers with new self-funded and fully insured PPO options in Northern California.” Currently, Sutter Health-affiliated providers care for more than three million Northern California residents. Aetna provides health care benefits to approximately 415,000 members in Northern California. Aetna projects to have at least 75 percent of its claim payments in value-based models by 2020. About Aetna Aetna is one of the nation's leading diversified health care benefits companies, serving an estimated 44.9 million people with information and resources to help them make better informed decisions about their health care. Aetna offers a broad range of traditional, voluntary and consumer-directed health insurance products and related services, including medical, pharmacy, dental, behavioral health, group life and disability plans, and medical management capabilities, Medicaid health care management services, workers' compensation administrative services and health information technology products and services. Aetna's customers include employer groups, individuals, college students, part-time and hourly workers, health plans, health care providers, governmental units, government-sponsored plans, labor groups and expatriates. For more information, see www.aetna.com and learn about how Aetna is helping to build a healthier world. @AetnaNews About Sutter Health Sutter Health is a nationally recognized leader in health care for quality outcomes, exceptional patient care and safety and was named one of the top performing health systems in the country by Truven in 2016. Rooted in Sutter Health’s not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support and learn from the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter pioneers adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to smart glass technology, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their medical journey.

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