Time filter

Source Type

Cape Town, South Africa

Petersen L.M.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Petersen L.M.,University of Queensland | Moll E.J.,University of the Western Cape | Hockings M.T.,University of Queensland | Collins R.J.,University of Queensland
Local Environment

Despite a highly visible presence, policy-maker knowledge of the drivers and participants in the informal economy of wild-harvested medicinal plants in Cape Town remains limited. To illuminate the workings of this local cultural business activity, the researchers adopted value chain analysis (VCA) for dissecting harvesting, trading and consumer demand in the trade. The study included qualitative, open-ended interviews with 58 traditional healers and a quantitative consumer study of 235 township households. Cape Town's traditional healers are numerous and potentially more uniquely culturally diverse than elsewhere, serving various community health needs. Healer groups enhance their healing reputation by utilising wild-sourced medicines – much of which is harvested locally. Their services remain culturally important and utilised by at least 50% of all consumer respondents. The VCA revealed a universal healer and consumer requirement for wild medicine stocks which has considerable implications for policy-making, protected area management and traditional medicine-oriented conservation projects. © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Source

Charman A.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Walzl G.,Stellenbosch University | Preiser W.,University of Cape Town
Open Infectious Diseases Journal

The paper reports on an investigation undertaken for the Network for European/ICPC cooperation in the field of AIDS and TB (EUCO-Net) into the state of biomedical research on the HIV/AIDS and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)/tuberculosis (TB) within 13 selected Sub-Saharan African countries. The case countries were Botswana, Central African Republic, Ethiopia, Gambia, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. An important objective of the research was to document the extent of linkages between HIV/AIDS and TB research endeavours within these countries to address co-infection. The study examines five aspects of current research in these fields. First, it considers individual country demographic and epidemiological status. Second, it examines the scope and costs of diagnostic services for these diseases. Third, it considers inter-cultural sensitivities that positively or negatively impact on (or influence) biomedical research in the case countries. Fourth, it identifies the extent of funding for basic science research and details the main institutional funders and recipients of funding. Fifth, it details the scale of medical studies with respect to the two diseases, identifying the scope of research activities within the case countries, the nature of the funding and research partners. The research concludes that African institutions can significantly contribute towards addressing the scientific challenges needed to advance diagnostics, pioneer new drugs and develop vaccines, but only if they receive a significantly higher injection of funding. South African institutions are well positioned (scientifically) to lead research within the African context, having the human capacity to conduct research and benefiting from supportive state institutions. © Charman et al. Source

Charman A.J.E.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Petersen L.M.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Petersen L.M.,University of Queensland | Govender T.,Urban Works Architecture and Urbanism
South African Geographical Journal

The paper explores the complex role of drinking in Sweet Home Farm (an informal settlement) through an examination of its contextual setting and its spatial characteristics. It examines, through a social-spatial ethnographic method and focus on a series of case studies, how shebeens are positioned in terms of their relationship to urban settlement, their role in providing publicly accessible venues within an over-crowed slum and influence on drinking outcomes. Our analysis of space focuses on the context of the informal settlement as an (un)regulated space which permits emergent spatial expressions and arrangements. Through a detail examination of four case studies, we consider the intimate configuration and organisation (place) of specific venues. From the perspective of place, the analysis examines the use (and non-use) of equipment/objects and internal architecture to define the character of particular typologies of establishments and their positioning vis-a-vis market niches. We reflect on the role and impact of shebeens on life within Sweet Home Farm, both in terms of providing space for socialisation and in supporting diverse cultures of drinking and business forms. © 2014 Society of South African Geographers. Source

Petersen L.M.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Petersen L.M.,University of Queensland | Charman A.J.E.,Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation | Moll E.J.,University of the Western Cape | And 2 more authors.
Society and Natural Resources

South Africa's organically emerged cultural business of traditional healing is almost exclusively reliant on wild-harvested resources extracted from wilderness areas or open-access commons. The wild medicine business has been described for much of South Africa, although is little understood in Cape Town, the urban centerpiece of the Cape Floristic Region (CFR). A census of different traditional healer typologies in five typical working-class residential areas (representing ~71,500 residents) was conducted to assess the nature and extent of traditional medicine harvesting and trade. Extrapolating these findings for the city reveals a local industry of more than 15,000 practitioners collectively conducting trade worth US $15.6 million per year. More than 40% of the volume of traditional medicines traded in the city is harvested from the CFR. Future conservation approaches must consider that the business of traditional healing and dispensing wild-harvested medicines is both economically important and culturally entrenched. © 2014 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source

Discover hidden collaborations