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Kennedy M.,Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland | Basu B.,Trinity College Dublin
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2014

This paper examines the complexity of the current negotiations to avert climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Drawing on economic game theory modelling, it interprets the latest developments within the international negotiations and provides a political economy analysis of the climate change architecture. It places the pursuit of international co-operation, via the Kyoto Protocol's second commitment period, in the context of a country's maintenance of national interest and a flexible emissions abatement strategy. Accepting that countries will reject an international agreement or obligation that is seen as inimical to their economic competitiveness, it incorporates a new game theory model, considers how learning from such models can influence agreement design and proposes a new approach from a non-monotonic polluting payoff function. Attention is placed on enabling conditions that entice countries to ratify a climate agreement, thereby encouraging participation and accelerating a near term deployment of low carbon technologies. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Kennedy M.,Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland | Basu B.,Trinity College Dublin
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2013

The paper critically reviews and explores the impact of renewable energy heat policies to induce technological change in Ireland. It is in response to the challenge of better understanding the broad effects and attributes of renewable energy policy instruments in Ireland and beyond. Using the Irish residential sector as a case study, and analysing data of more than 31,600 technology installations under the Irish Government's Greener Homes Scheme [GHS], the paper assesses the extent to which policy makers may be informed of the willingness of consumers to adopt these technologies in their homes. In doing so, it attempts to provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation in relation to renewable energy in the residential sector. It represents investment decisions and technological choice by the end user and reflects the growing concern among energy policy markets regarding the representation of user preferences. The overall intent is to investigate the implications of analysing different variables and their contribution to making more balanced renewable energy policies. It provides a critical analysis of the Greener Homes Scheme, the key instrument for implementing Ireland's renewable heating policy from 2006 to 2010, established to induce technological change within the residential sector. In assessing the impact of the Scheme, attention focuses on decision frameworks for technological choice and the treatment of market and behavioural failures. It considers how consumers have responded to new technological policies aimed at deploying renewable heat technologies, and the specific policies aimed at advancing certain technologies over others. Through a case study investigation, the paper explores the relationship and dependencies that influence consumers' decision-making regarding the choice of renewable energy heating technologies in the domestic sector in Ireland. Consumer preferences and their subsequent investment decisions, motives and technological choice are reflected. It concludes that while economic factors are important, a much broader variety of determinants is required when analysing the process of adoption of technology. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Kennedy M.,Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland | Dinh V.-N.,Galway Technology Park | Dinh V.-N.,Trinity College Dublin | Basu B.,Trinity College Dublin
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2016

Through a modelling-based contribution, this paper critically reviews and explores the impact of low carbon heat policies to induce technological policy development. The paper interrogates an Irish government funded sustainable energy financed scheme (the 'Greener Homes Scheme'), launched in 2006 and aimed at the deployment of low carbon technology in the residential sector. This paper analyses 31,560 technology installations supported under this scheme and it utilises artificial neural network modelling as a method of better analysing and understanding the effects, relationships and dependencies that influence consumer decision making and responses to new technological policies. It is responding to a perceived limited understanding of the variables that influence a wider adoption of low carbon technologies and the opportunities and potential that could result in a wider appreciation of the broader impact of market barriers. It builds up on the artificial neural networks modelling work, explores its application in pattern recognition and interprets its influence in predicting customer behaviour. The paper provides an enhanced understanding of the various factors that influence consumer selection of one low carbon technology over another. Evaluation of the results revealed that the developed artificial neural network model (generic 7-6-4 neurons layered architecture) is the most appropriate tool and suitable network in predicting indices, based on certain social conditions, on the choice of certain low carbon technologies. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


News Article | November 9, 2015
Site: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com

The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) is funding the Ireland division of U.S.-based Ocean Renewable Power Co. (ORPC) to identify feasible tidal energy sites in the coastal waters of County Donegal. 


Kennedy M.,Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland | Basu B.,Trinity College Dublin
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2013

Through a case study investigation, this paper critically reviews and explores the impact of a number of projects within developing and emerging economies that are advancing low carbon technologies. It is in response to the challenge of better understanding the broad effect of imperfections and barriers that may alter the acceleration of such technologies. In analysing the impact of a number of projects, it highlights the challenges that projects are encountering and attempts to provide some valuable guidance for policy makers. The paper considers the realms of regulatory, institutional, financial and information frameworks that may prevent the accelerated development of markets for low carbon technologies. It concludes that such barriers have implications for energy policy and presents some lessons and potential actions that can aid policy makers, market actors and technology innovators in understanding the transfer and deployment of low carbon technologies. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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