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Fleige L.E.,Sustain Inc. | Moore W.R.,Sustain Inc. | Garlick P.J.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Murphy S.P.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | And 4 more authors.
Nutrition Reviews | Year: 2010

Fortified blended foods (FBFs)were introduced into the Food for Peace program(also known as US Public Law 480) in the 1960s. Minimal changes have since been made to their formulations. A Food Aid Quality Enhancement Project to assess the nutritional adequacy of FBFs for vulnerable populations was conducted, and the findings indicate that FBFs do not meet the nutritional needs of infants and young children between the ages of 6 and 24 months. Improvements are also needed for FBFs intended for school-aged children and adults. Two separate products would better meet the varying nutritional needs of diverse groups of beneficiaries. Proposed here is a two-step strategy for better addressing the needs of today's food aid beneficiaries: 1) improving FBFs for general distribution to households, schools, and emergency settings, with potential efficiencies gained in manufacturing and formulation to reduce costs; 2) developing new products for infants and young children, which would deliver the nutrient density required for growth and development. © 2010 International Life Sciences Institute.


Fleige L.E.,Sustain Inc. | Sahyoun N.R.,University of Maryland University College | Murphy S.P.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2010

Current micronutrient levels in Public Law 480 fortified blended foods (FBF) may not be appropriate for all food aid beneficiaries, particularly infants and/or young children and pregnant and/or lactating women. A simulation model was developed to determine the micronutrient fortification levels to include in FBF for food aid programs with the goal of reducing the risk of inadequate micronutrient intakes without exceeding the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for any recipient group. For each micronutrient, the age and gender group with the highest daily Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) relative to energy requirement was identified and the effect of providing different percentages of that RNI (66, 75, and 100%) was simulated. In this modeling exercise, we also examined consumption of the FBF at 25 (the usual level), 50, and 100% of daily energy requirement. Results indicated that 2 FBF products are needed: a complementary food for age 6-36 mo and a supplementary food for the older groups. Both of the FBF could be fortified to supply at least 75% of the RNI to all groups, without exceeding the UL for most nutrients, if consumed at 25% of the energy requirement. Even if consumed at 50% of energy requirements, mean intakes of most micronutrients would not exceed the UL, although at 100% of the energy requirement, several micronutrients were undesirably high. We conclude that fortifying an FBF to provide 75% of the RNI would be appropriate for most micronutrients, but this level of fortification would not be appropriate for long-term consumption of the FBF at 100% of the energy requirements. © 2010 American Society for Nutrition.


Stokes L.,Keele University | Stokes L.,Sustain Inc. | Combes H.,Staffordshire University | Stokes G.,BUPA UK
Psychogeriatrics | Year: 2015

This review examines how people understand and make sense of a dementia diagnosis. The review explores how lay frameworks and information presented at diagnosis may inform a caregiver's understanding of dementia in a family member. Existing qualitative research exploring how caregivers understand and make sense of dementia is reviewed. A literature search was conducted, and the results indicated that family carers often receive little or unclear information about dementia, with diagnostic information often delivered in euphemistic terms. Lack of clarity regarding diagnosis and prognosis creates uncertainty for caregivers and impacts future care planning. Caregiver's understandings of the condition vary, with some symptoms often not attributed to the condition. The literature highlights significant gaps and misconceptions in public knowledge regarding dementia, which raises questions about how family caregivers understand the condition. Further research is required to explore how information is presented to family carers at the time of diagnosis and how this is used to understand the condition. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 The Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.


Moore W.R.,Sustain Inc. | DeVries J.,Medallion Laboratories General Mills Inc. | MacDonald J.,Organic Laboratory | Hare L.,Statistical Strategies LLC
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2010

Two multilaboratory investigations were conducted by SUSTAIN to assess variability in the measurement of vitamin A, the marker used to verify levels of vitamin premix addition to enriched/fortified food aid products, including the widely distributed corn-soy blend (CSB). CSB specifications identify AACC Approved Method 86-06 or equivalent methods for vitamin A analysis, however there is no requirement to demonstrate equivalency. CSB samples with known and blinded levels of vitamin A and a reference standard were analyzed by 16 laboratories using their respective methods. Calculated coefficients of variation across all laboratories and methods for unknown samples and reference standard were 35 and 7.1%, respectively, suggesting the largest source of variation is the vitamin extraction procedure. Laboratories generally overestimated low levels and underestimated high levels of vitamin A within the range of 6000 and 16 000 lU/lb. Only two laboratories demonstrated excellent internal precision (±300 IU vitamin A/lb) and reported values within 95% confidence interval for all blinded samples. Results of this study have implications both for quality control in food aid products (due to the use of vitamin A as a marker) and for regulatory oversight of vitamin A content in commercial food products.


SAN DIEGO, Dec. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited chronic disorder characterized by rigid, sickle-shaped red blood cells that get stuck in veins and block blood flow, which can cause severe pain, stroke, organ failure, and complications leading...


PubMed | Sustain Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of nutrition | Year: 2010

Current micronutrient levels in Public Law 480 fortified blended foods (FBF) may not be appropriate for all food aid beneficiaries, particularly infants and/or young children and pregnant and/or lactating women. A simulation model was developed to determine the micronutrient fortification levels to include in FBF for food aid programs with the goal of reducing the risk of inadequate micronutrient intakes without exceeding the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for any recipient group. For each micronutrient, the age and gender group with the highest daily Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) relative to energy requirement was identified and the effect of providing different percentages of that RNI (66, 75, and 100%) was simulated. In this modeling exercise, we also examined consumption of the FBF at 25 (the usual level), 50, and 100% of daily energy requirement. Results indicated that 2 FBF products are needed: a complementary food for age 6-36 mo and a supplementary food for the older groups. Both of the FBF could be fortified to supply at least 75% of the RNI to all groups, without exceeding the UL for most nutrients, if consumed at 25% of the energy requirement. Even if consumed at 50% of energy requirements, mean intakes of most micronutrients would not exceed the UL, although at 100% of the energy requirement, several micronutrients were undesirably high. We conclude that fortifying an FBF to provide 75% of the RNI would be appropriate for most micronutrients, but this level of fortification would not be appropriate for long-term consumption of the FBF at 100% of the energy requirements.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

MORGANTOWN, W.Va., Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- SustainU®, a leading producer of 100% recycled and American-Made fan wear, today announced an extension of its licensing partnership with MLB®, creating a T-shirt club for baseball fans. The MLB® T-Shirt Club by SustainU® features all 30 MLB...

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