SUSS MicroOptics SA

Hauterive, Switzerland

SUSS MicroOptics SA

Hauterive, Switzerland
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Optics InfoBase Conference Papers | Year: 2017

Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology (KET) for many productions and applications today. We report on the state of the art of wafer-scale manufacturing, testing and packaging of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. © OSA 2017.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EID | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EID | Award Amount: 3.86M | Year: 2016

The target of this project is to prepare and train future engineers for the design challenges and opportunities provided by modern optics technology. Such challenges include lossless photon management, modelling at the system, components and feature level, and the link between design and technology. Today all optical designs are often perceived following different approaches, namely geometrical optics, physical optics and nano-photonics. Traditionally these approaches are linked to the different lengths-scale that are important to the system. Starting from the entire system that is macroscopic and uses geometrical optics, over the miniaturized unit that is based on micro-optics and needs physical optics design, down to the active nano-photonics entity that allows steering light truly at the nano-scale but which requires to be designed with rigorous methods that provide full wave solutions to the governing Maxwells equations. A design for manufacture of next generation optical applications necessarily requires to bridge the gap between the different length scales and to consider the design at a holistic level. At the core are optical simulation models developed and used in the academic research and the one used for optical designs in industry. Up to now, only the academic partners apply an integral approach to include micro- and nano-photonics in their simulations. Together with the industrial partners projects will be launched to promote the academic developments in optical design and simulation over different length scales towards the industry. The industry will use the know-how to consolidate their expertise, expand their businesses, and occupy new fields of activities. For each research subject, may it be nano-photonics, micro-optics or system engineering, a channel can be provided to access particular knowledge and/or stimulate collaborations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.1 | Award Amount: 14.06M | Year: 2010

SEAL is a project for an integrated project consisting of 17 equipment assessment sub-projects in the area of semiconductor manufacturing equipment. The assessment themes are equally spread amongst processing and metrology equipment, heading beyond the current state-of-the-art both for More Moore and More than Moore applications. The strategic objective of SEAL is to effectively combine efforts, resources and expertise in the joint assessment of novel equipment supported by cross-cut R&D dedicated to the identified needs of the assessment sub-projects.For Lithography, the key areas of illumination systems for mask aligners, EUV mask manufacturing and intelligent overlay management are addressed as well as massively parallel e-beam lithography. In addition, three important processes are addressed: low temperature oxidation, cleaning of sensitive interconnect stacks/structures and ion implantation for ultra shallow junctions and defect engineering. For metrology and analysis, the main focus is on enabling innovative systems to efficiently contribute to at-line and in-line monitoring and control within semiconductor facilities. Without such equipment, it will not be possible to validate progressively advanced processes during development and manufacturing.Cross-cut R&D activities relating to all equipment assessment sub-projects are covered including APC, model based control, equipment simulation, enhanced wafer and equipment logistics, advanced communication and man machine-interfaces, and virtual equipment engineering. A common approach for the assessment activities will be utilised with specifications that will be refined for each equipment type for the progressively emerging technology nodes.Overall, SEAL will strengthen the European equipment manufacturing industry in an ideal and sustainable way by combining advanced R&D topics in equipment sub-projects involving a wide community of users, research institutes and equipment suppliers with many SMEs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.3 | Award Amount: 4.32M | Year: 2013

The ACTION project builds on the recent discovery that relatively low levels of pulsed infrared laser light are capable of triggering activity in hair cells of the partially hearing (hearing impaired) cochlea and vestibule. So far the excessively large volume of optical fibre systems and external light sources used for animal studies prevented the practical use of this discovery for long term animal research devices or for human grade implants. ACTION aims to develop a self-contained, smart, highly miniaturised system to provide optoacoustic stimuli directly from the electrode array of a cochlear implant system. The resultant neural cell response will be electrically recorded and direct feedback to the light source will be provided to enable automated, objective hearing threshold assessment and optimization of sound feature coding enhancements for improved quality of the acoustic sound. The new implant is aimed to lead to more effective non-contact treatment, as a device with intra-cochlear sound sources offers many potential advantages over a traditional in the ear hearing aid/speech processor combination. This approach will at the same time avoid damage of neural tissue by high electrical current, and introduction of high-frequency artifacts to the recording signal. Biocompatible, long-term implantable materials for micropackage and integration principles for the light sources (specific pulsed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers optimized for optical neurostimulation) will be selected. The project includes neural response measurements and communication between discrete elements to achieve robust and reliable miniature standalone devices with high acceptance within the medical sector. Pre-clinical tests for optoacoustic cochlear implants will be an integral part of the project.


Weichelt T.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Vogler U.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | Stuerzebecher L.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | And 2 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2014

The application of the phase-shift method allows a significant resolution enhancement for proximity lithography in mask aligners. Typically a resolution of 3 μm (half-pitch) at a proximity distance of 30 μm is achieved utilizing binary photomasks. By using an alternating aperture phase shift photomask (AAPSM), a resolution of 1.5 μm (half-pitch) for non-periodic lines and spaces pattern was demonstrated at 30 μm proximity gap. In a second attempt a diffractive photomask design for an elbow pattern having a half-pitch of 2 μm was developed with an iterative design algorithm. The photomask was fabricated by electron-beam lithography and consists of binary amplitude and phase levels. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


Stuerzebecher L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Harzendorf T.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Vogler U.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | Zeitner U.D.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Optics Express | Year: 2010

The Talbot effect is utilized for micro-fabrication of periodic microstructures via proximity lithography in a mask aligner. A novel illumination system, referred to as MO Exposure Optics, allows to control the effective source shape and accordingly the angular spectrum of the illumination light. Pinhole array photomasks are employed to generate periodic high-resolution diffraction patterns by means of self-imaging. They create a demagnified image of the effective source geometry in their diffraction pattern which is printed to photoresist. The proposed method comprises high flexibility and sub-micron resolution at large proximity gaps. Various periodic structures have been generated and are presented. © 2010 Optical Society of America.


Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

Optical lithography has been the engine that has empowered semiconductor industry to continually reduce the half-pitch for over 50 years. In early mask aligners a simple movie lamp was enough to illuminate the photomask. Illumination started to play a more decisive role when proximity mask aligners appeared in the mid-1970s. Off-axis illumination was introduced to reduce diffraction effects. For early projection lithography systems (wafer steppers), the only challenge was to collect the light efficiently to ensure short exposure time. When projection optics reached highest level of perfection, further improvement was achieved by optimizing illumination. Shaping the illumination light, also referred as pupil shaping, allows the optical path from reticle to wafer to be optimized and thus has a major impact on aberrations and diffraction effects. Highly-efficient micro-optical components are perfectly suited for this task. Micro-optics for illumination evolved from simple flat-top (fly's-eye) to annular, dipole, quadrupole, multipole and freeform illumination. Today, programmable micro-mirror arrays allow illumination to be changed on the fly. The impact of refractive, diffractive and reflective microoptics for photolithography will be discussed. © 2014 SPIE.


Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Proceedings of Frontiers in Optics 2015, FIO 2015 | Year: 2015

Photolithography is the engine that empowered microelectronics and semiconductor industry for more than 50 years. Photolithography allows building very complex micro- and nanostructures by copying a pattern from a photomask to a wafer. Photolithography is the key enabling technology (KET) behind the powerful concept of "shrinkage", also referred to as "die shrink", the ability to reduce the minimum feature size of transistors, electronic wires and other components of a microchip from some 50 microns in the early 1960s to some tens of nanometers today. Die shrink allows manufacturing more chips on a wafer, reducing manufacturing costs, minimizing the power consumption and improving the performance in terms of speed, storage capacity and customer convenience. Planar micro-optical elements play a decisive role in modern photolithography systems, e.g. for line width narrowing, laser beam shaping (customized illumination), phase-shift masks (PSM), optical proximity correction (OPC), diffraction-based overlay (DBO). In a holistic approach, modern photolithography uses precise shaping of the illumination light in combination with optimized phase-shift masks, referred to as source-mask optimization (SMO), to minimize diffraction effects and residual aberrations in the projection optics. This paper summarizes the development of planar micro-optics from the invention of a computergenerated hologram (CGH) in the 1960s towards today's wafer-based manufacturing of high-quality refractive and diffractive planar micro-optical elements. The manufacturing of planar micro-optics on wafer-level and the applications in modern projection lithography systems will be explained. © OSA 2015.


Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
MOC 2015 - Technical Digest of 20th Microoptics Conference | Year: 2015

Photolithography is the engine that empowered microelectronics and semiconductor industry for more than 50 years. Photolithography is the enabling process behind the powerful concept of "shrinkage ", also referred to as "die shrink ", the ability to reduce the minimum feature size of transistors, electronic wires and other components of a microchip from some 50 microns in the early 1960s to some tens of nanometers today. Die shrink allows manufacturing more chips on a wafer, reducing manufacturing costs, minimizing the power consumption and improving the performance in terms of speed, storage capacity and customer convenience. Diffractive and refractive micro-optical elements play a decisive role in modern photolithography systems, e.g. for laser line width narrowing, laser beam shaping (customized illumination), as phase-shift masks (PSM), for optical proximity correction (OPC), and for diffraction-based overlay (DBO). The contribution of micro-optics in photolithography enhancement will be discussed in detail. © 2015 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.


Harzendorf T.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Stuerzebecher L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Vogler U.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | Zeitner U.D.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

The half-tone lithography using pixilated chromium masks in a projection stepper is an established technology in micro-optics fabrication. However, the projection lithography tool is comparably expensive and the achievable lateral resolution is typically limited. By using pixel diffraction effects, binary and continuous profile lithography with submicron resolution can be installed on a conventional mask aligner. To achieve this goal the control of both, the angular spectrum of the illumination and the mask features is essential. We used a novel micro-optics based illumination system referred as "MO Exposure Optics System" in a SUSS MicroTec MA6 mask aligner for the dedicated shaping of the angular illumination distribution. In combination with an adapted lithography mask the formation of a desired intensity distribution in the resist layer is possible. A general mathematic model describes the relation between the angular spectrum of the mask illumination, pixel size and pitch in the mask, proximity distance and propagated field, which also includes special cases like Talbot imaging. We show that a wide range of different micro-optical structures can be optimized by controlling the light diffraction in proximity lithography. Parameter settings were found for submicron binary pattern up to continuous profile structures with extensions up to several tens of microns. An additional interesting application of this approach is the combination of binary and continuous profiles in single elements, e.g. micro lenses with diffractive correction or AR structures. Experimental results achieved for blazed gratings with a period of 2 microns are presented. © 2010 SPIE.

Loading SUSS MicroOptics SA collaborators
Loading SUSS MicroOptics SA collaborators