Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
MOC 2015 - Technical Digest of 20th Microoptics Conference | Year: 2015

Photolithography is the engine that empowered microelectronics and semiconductor industry for more than 50 years. Photolithography is the enabling process behind the powerful concept of "shrinkage ", also referred to as "die shrink ", the ability to reduce the minimum feature size of transistors, electronic wires and other components of a microchip from some 50 microns in the early 1960s to some tens of nanometers today. Die shrink allows manufacturing more chips on a wafer, reducing manufacturing costs, minimizing the power consumption and improving the performance in terms of speed, storage capacity and customer convenience. Diffractive and refractive micro-optical elements play a decisive role in modern photolithography systems, e.g. for laser line width narrowing, laser beam shaping (customized illumination), as phase-shift masks (PSM), for optical proximity correction (OPC), and for diffraction-based overlay (DBO). The contribution of micro-optics in photolithography enhancement will be discussed in detail. © 2015 The Japan Society of Applied Physics. Source


Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

Optical lithography has been the engine that has empowered semiconductor industry to continually reduce the half-pitch for over 50 years. In early mask aligners a simple movie lamp was enough to illuminate the photomask. Illumination started to play a more decisive role when proximity mask aligners appeared in the mid-1970s. Off-axis illumination was introduced to reduce diffraction effects. For early projection lithography systems (wafer steppers), the only challenge was to collect the light efficiently to ensure short exposure time. When projection optics reached highest level of perfection, further improvement was achieved by optimizing illumination. Shaping the illumination light, also referred as pupil shaping, allows the optical path from reticle to wafer to be optimized and thus has a major impact on aberrations and diffraction effects. Highly-efficient micro-optical components are perfectly suited for this task. Micro-optics for illumination evolved from simple flat-top (fly's-eye) to annular, dipole, quadrupole, multipole and freeform illumination. Today, programmable micro-mirror arrays allow illumination to be changed on the fly. The impact of refractive, diffractive and reflective microoptics for photolithography will be discussed. © 2014 SPIE. Source


Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Proceedings of Frontiers in Optics 2015, FIO 2015 | Year: 2015

Photolithography is the engine that empowered microelectronics and semiconductor industry for more than 50 years. Photolithography allows building very complex micro- and nanostructures by copying a pattern from a photomask to a wafer. Photolithography is the key enabling technology (KET) behind the powerful concept of "shrinkage", also referred to as "die shrink", the ability to reduce the minimum feature size of transistors, electronic wires and other components of a microchip from some 50 microns in the early 1960s to some tens of nanometers today. Die shrink allows manufacturing more chips on a wafer, reducing manufacturing costs, minimizing the power consumption and improving the performance in terms of speed, storage capacity and customer convenience. Planar micro-optical elements play a decisive role in modern photolithography systems, e.g. for line width narrowing, laser beam shaping (customized illumination), phase-shift masks (PSM), optical proximity correction (OPC), diffraction-based overlay (DBO). In a holistic approach, modern photolithography uses precise shaping of the illumination light in combination with optimized phase-shift masks, referred to as source-mask optimization (SMO), to minimize diffraction effects and residual aberrations in the projection optics. This paper summarizes the development of planar micro-optics from the invention of a computergenerated hologram (CGH) in the 1960s towards today's wafer-based manufacturing of high-quality refractive and diffractive planar micro-optical elements. The manufacturing of planar micro-optics on wafer-level and the applications in modern projection lithography systems will be explained. © OSA 2015. Source


Weichelt T.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Vogler U.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | Stuerzebecher L.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | And 2 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2014

The application of the phase-shift method allows a significant resolution enhancement for proximity lithography in mask aligners. Typically a resolution of 3 μm (half-pitch) at a proximity distance of 30 μm is achieved utilizing binary photomasks. By using an alternating aperture phase shift photomask (AAPSM), a resolution of 1.5 μm (half-pitch) for non-periodic lines and spaces pattern was demonstrated at 30 μm proximity gap. In a second attempt a diffractive photomask design for an elbow pattern having a half-pitch of 2 μm was developed with an iterative design algorithm. The photomask was fabricated by electron-beam lithography and consists of binary amplitude and phase levels. © 2014 Optical Society of America. Source


Stuerzebecher L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Harzendorf T.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Vogler U.,SUSS MicroOptics SA | Zeitner U.D.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | Voelkel R.,SUSS MicroOptics SA
Optics Express | Year: 2010

The Talbot effect is utilized for micro-fabrication of periodic microstructures via proximity lithography in a mask aligner. A novel illumination system, referred to as MO Exposure Optics, allows to control the effective source shape and accordingly the angular spectrum of the illumination light. Pinhole array photomasks are employed to generate periodic high-resolution diffraction patterns by means of self-imaging. They create a demagnified image of the effective source geometry in their diffraction pattern which is printed to photoresist. The proposed method comprises high flexibility and sub-micron resolution at large proximity gaps. Various periodic structures have been generated and are presented. © 2010 Optical Society of America. Source

Discover hidden collaborations