Surgical Research Laboratories

Medicine at, Lebanon

Surgical Research Laboratories

Medicine at, Lebanon

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Kuijlen J.M.A.,University of Groningen | Bremer E.,University of Würzburg | Mooij J.J.A.,University of Groningen | Den Dunnen W.F.A.,University of Groningen | Helfrich W.,Surgical Research Laboratories
Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology | Year: 2010

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating cancer with a median survival of around 15 months. Significant advances in treatment have not been achieved yet, even with a host of new therapeutics under investigation. Therefore, the quest for a cure for GBM remains as intense as ever. Of particular interest for GBM therapy is the selective induction of apoptosis using the pro-apoptotic tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL signals apoptosis via its two agonistic receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. TRAIL is normally present as homotrimeric transmembrane protein, but can also be processed into a soluble trimeric form (sTRAIL). Recombinant sTRAIL has strong tumouricidal activity towards GBM cells, with no or minimal toxicity towards normal human cells. Unfortunately, GBM is a very heterogeneous tumour, with multiple genetically aberrant clones within one tumour. Consequently, any single agent therapy is likely to be not effective enough. However, the anti-GBM activity of TRAIL can be synergistically enhanced by a variety of conventional and novel targeted therapies, making TRAIL an ideal candidate for combinatorial strategies. Here we will, after briefly detailing the biology of TRAIL/TRAIL receptor signalling, focus on the promises and pitfalls of recombinant TRAIL as a therapeutic agent alone and in combinatorial therapeutic approaches for GBM. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Savellano M.D.,Surgical Research Laboratories | Owusu-Brackett N.,Surgical Research Laboratories | Owusu-Brackett N.,University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | Son J.,Surgical Research Laboratories | And 4 more authors.
Photochemistry and Photobiology | Year: 2013

A novel pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) derivative, Ac-sPPp, was developed in our lab for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) and combination therapies. Its versatile peptide moiety, high water-solubility, amphiphilicity, and micellar aggregation allow efficient coupling to targeting moieties and convenient mixing with other therapeutics. Photosensitizer immunoconjugate (PIC) targeted PDT, using Ac-sPPp conjugated to therapeutic anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab, and PDT + chemotherapy combination treatment, using Ac-sPPp mixed with stealth liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), were investigated as promising strategies for potentiating PDT and improving target specificity. Passively targeted PDT with Ac-sPPp only or surfactant-solubilized PPa was also investigated for comparison. The A-431 human vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, xenografted in nude mice, was chosen as a tumor model because of its high EGFR expression and sensitivity to liposomal doxorubicin in vitro. Fluorescence imaging and PDT experiments showed that Ac-sPPp formulations circulated far longer and provided superior tumor contrast and superior tumor control compared to PPa. Strong PDT vascular effects were observed by laser Doppler imaging regardless of whether Ac-sPPp was passively or actively targeted. Passively targeted Ac-sPPp PDT gave equivalent or better tumor control than PIC-targeted PDT or PDT + Doxil combination therapy, and when treatments were repeated, it also yielded the highest cure rate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Savellano M.D.,Surgical Research Laboratories | Owusu-Brackett N.,Surgical Research Laboratories | Son J.,Surgical Research Laboratories | Callier T.,Surgical Research Laboratories | And 2 more authors.
Photochemistry and Photobiology | Year: 2010

To better assess the efficacy of erbB-targeted therapies, it would help to have optical reporting human tumor xenograft models that abundantly express erbB receptors. A-431 cells have frequently been used in erbB1-targeting studies, but a well-characterized optical reporting version of the cell line has not been readily available. In this study, optical reporting A-431 clones were developed that express both a fluorescent protein reporter (green, GFP; or red, RFP) and a bioluminescent reporter, firefly luciferase. Reporter genes were transduced into cells using commercial lentiviral vectors, and clonal selection was carried out using a series of procedures. A number of clones were isolated for further characterization. A GFP/luciferase clone, A-431/D4, and an RFP/luciferase clone, A-431/G4, were obtained that exhibit erbB1 expression levels and tumor growth kinetics similar to the parental cells. To demonstrate the utility of the optical reporting clones, A-431/G4 tumors were grown subcutaneously in nude mice and treated with vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT), which targets the angiogenic consequences of erbB signaling. The A-431/G4 tumor model permitted highly sensitive longitudinal monitoring of PDT treatment response using optical imaging. A-431/D4 and A-431/G4 optical reporting tumor models should also prove useful for assessing therapies that directly target the erbB1 receptor. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation. The American Society of Photobiology.


PubMed | Surgical Research Laboratories
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Photochemistry and photobiology | Year: 2013

A novel pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) derivative, Ac-sPPp, was developed in our lab for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) and combination therapies. Its versatile peptide moiety, high water-solubility, amphiphilicity, and micellar aggregation allow efficient coupling to targeting moieties and convenient mixing with other therapeutics. Photosensitizer immunoconjugate (PIC) targeted PDT, using Ac-sPPp conjugated to therapeutic anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab, and PDT + chemotherapy combination treatment, using Ac-sPPp mixed with stealth liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), were investigated as promising strategies for potentiating PDT and improving target specificity. Passively targeted PDT with Ac-sPPp only or surfactant-solubilized PPa was also investigated for comparison. The A-431 human vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, xenografted in nude mice, was chosen as a tumor model because of its high EGFR expression and sensitivity to liposomal doxorubicin in vitro. Fluorescence imaging and PDT experiments showed that Ac-sPPp formulations circulated far longer and provided superior tumor contrast and superior tumor control compared to PPa. Strong PDT vascular effects were observed by laser Doppler imaging regardless of whether Ac-sPPp was passively or actively targeted. Passively targeted Ac-sPPp PDT gave equivalent or better tumor control than PIC-targeted PDT or PDT + Doxil combination therapy, and when treatments were repeated, it also yielded the highest cure rate.


PubMed | Surgical Research Laboratories
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Photochemistry and photobiology | Year: 2010

To better assess the efficacy of erbB-targeted therapies, it would help to have optical reporting human tumor xenograft models that abundantly express erbB receptors. A-431 cells have frequently been used in erbB1-targeting studies, but a well-characterized optical reporting version of the cell line has not been readily available. In this study, optical reporting A-431 clones were developed that express both a fluorescent protein reporter (green, GFP; or red, RFP) and a bioluminescent reporter, firefly luciferase. Reporter genes were transduced into cells using commercial lentiviral vectors, and clonal selection was carried out using a series of procedures. A number of clones were isolated for further characterization. A GFP/luciferase clone, A-431/D4, and an RFP/luciferase clone, A-431/G4, were obtained that exhibit erbB1 expression levels and tumor growth kinetics similar to the parental cells. To demonstrate the utility of the optical reporting clones, A-431/G4 tumors were grown subcutaneously in nude mice and treated with vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT), which targets the angiogenic consequences of erbB signaling. The A-431/G4 tumor model permitted highly sensitive longitudinal monitoring of PDT treatment response using optical imaging. A-431/D4 and A-431/G4 optical reporting tumor models should also prove useful for assessing therapies that directly target the erbB1 receptor.

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