Emergency and Transplant Surgery

Palermo, Italy

Emergency and Transplant Surgery

Palermo, Italy
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Scerrino G.,Emergency and Transplant Surgery | Inviati A.,Emergency and Transplant Surgery | Di Giovanni S.,Emergency and Transplant Surgery | Paladino N.C.,Emergency and Transplant Surgery | And 8 more authors.
Giornale di Chirurgia | Year: 2016

Background. Patients undergoing thyroidectomy often complain aerodigestive disorders. In a previous study we showed the associations between voice impairment and proximal acid reflux, swallowing impairment and Upper Esophageal Sphyncter (UES) incoordination and the decrease in UES pressure in thirty-six patients observed before and soon afterwards uncomplicated thyroidectomy. This study investigated the state of post-thyroidectomy esophageal motility changes and its associations with these disorders after 18-24 months. Patients and methods. The thirty-six patients prospectively recruited according to selection criteria (thyroid volume ≤60 ml, benign disease, age 18-65 years, previous neck surgery, thyroiditis, pre- or postoperative vocal cord palsy) underwent voice (VIS) and swallowing (SIS) impairment scores, esophageal manometry and pH monitoring once again. Results. After 18-24 months, both VIS and SIS recovered (respectively: p=0,022; p=0,0001); UES pressure increased (p=0,0001) nearing the preoperative values. The persistence of swallowing complaints were associated with the persistence of esophageal incoordination (p=0,03); the association between voice impairment and proximal acid reflux was confirmed (p<0,001). Conclusions. Our study confirms that aerodigestive disorders after uncomplicated thyroidectomy, largely transient, are strictly connected with upper esophageal motility changes. In this viewpoint, the innervation of upper aerodigestive anatomical structures (larynx, pharynx, upper esophagus) and its variations should be focused. © 2016, CIC Edizioni Internazionali, Roma.


Guarnotta V.,University of Palermo | Riela S.,University of Palermo | Massaro M.,University of Palermo | Bonventre S.,Emergency and Transplant Surgery | And 5 more authors.
Frontiers in Endocrinology | Year: 2017

The consumption of soft drinks is a crucial factor in determining persistent hypocalcemia. The aim of the study is to evaluate the biochemical mechanisms inducing hypocalcemia in a female patient with usual high consumption of cola drink and persistent hypocalcemia, who failed to respond to high doses of calcium and calcitriol supplementation. At baseline and after pentagastrin injection, gastric secretion (Gs) and duodenal secretion (Ds) samples were collected and calcium and total phosphorus (Ptot) concentrations were evaluated. At the same time, blood calcium, Ptot, sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium concentrations, and vitamin D were sampled. After intake of cola (1 L) over 180 min, Gs and Ds and blood were collected and characterized in order to analyze the amount of calcium and Ptot or sodium, potassium, magnesium, and chloride ions, respectively. A strong pH decrease was observed after cola intake with an increase in phosphorus concentration. Consequently, a decrease in calcium concentration in Gs and Ds was observed. A decrease in calcium concentration was also observed in blood. In conclusion, we confirm that in patients with postsurgical hypoparathyroidism, the intake of large amounts of cola containing high amounts of phosphoric acid reduces calcium absorption efficiency despite the high doses of calcium therapy. © 2017 Guarnotta, Riela, Massaro, Bonventre, Inviati, Ciresi, Pizzolanti, Benvenga and Giordano.

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