Brighton, MA, United States
Brighton, MA, United States

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Kim E.,Surface Logix | Campbell S.,Surface Logix | Schueller O.,Surface Logix | Wong E.,Surface Logix | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics | Year: 2011

First-generation microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitors were designed to inhibit hepatic MTP and provide a novel treatment of dyslipidemia. Effective at lowering low-density lipo-protein-cholesterol (LDL-C), these inhibitors also elevate liver enzymes and induce hepatic steatosis in animals and humans. MTP is highly expressed in the enterocytes, lining the lumen of the jejunum, and is critical in the production of chylomicrons assembled from lipid/cholesterol and their transfer into systemic circulation. 6-(4′-Trifluoromethyl-6-methoxy-biphenyl-2-ylcarboxamido)-1, 2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-2-carboxylic acid phenyl ester (SLx-4090) (IC 50 value ∼8 nM) was designed to inhibit only MTP localized to enterocytes. In Caco-2 cells SLx-4090 inhibited apolipoprotein B (IC 50 value ∼9.6 nM) but not apolipoprotein A1 secretion. Administered orally to rats SLx-4090 reduced postprandial lipids by >50% with an ED50 value ∼7 mg/kg. SLx-4090 was not detected in the systemic or portal vein serum of the animals (lower limit of quantitation ∼5 ng/ml) after single or multiple oral doses in fasted rodents. When coadministered with tyloxapol, SLx-4090 did not inhibit the secretion of hepatic triglycerides (TG), consistent with the absence of systemic exposure. Chronic treatment with SLx-4090 in mice maintained on a high-fat diet decreased LDL-C and TG and resulted in weight loss without the elevation of liver enzymes or an increase in hepatic fat. The compound did not result in toxicity when administered to rats for 90 days at a dose of 1000 mg/kg per day. These data support the concept that the inhibition of enterocytic MTP could serve as a useful strategy in the treatment of metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2011 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.


Patent
Surface Logix | Date: 2014-12-23

The present invention relates to inhibitors of ROCK1 and ROCK2 and methods of modulating the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic properties of such compounds. Also provided are methods of inhibiting ROCK1 and or ROCK2 that are useful for the treatment of disease.


Patent
Surface Logix | Date: 2012-12-07

A compound of formula A having improved non-specific binding characteristics and pharmacokinetic properties is provided: or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, stereoisomer, or hydrate thereof.


Patent
Surface Logix | Date: 2012-12-14

The present invention relates to inhibitors of ROCK1 and ROCK2 and methods of modulating the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic properties of such compounds. Also provided are methods of inhibiting ROCK1 and or ROCK2 that are useful for the treatment of disease.


Patent
Surface Logix | Date: 2014-03-12

A compound of the formula (A) having improved non-specific binding characteristics and pharmacokinetic properties is provided or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, stereoisomer, or hydrate thereof.


Aveo Adds Termeer to Board, Monsanto Partners With Atlas, Biogen Drug Meets Clinical Goal, & More Boston-Area Life Sciences News We saw financings, CEO and board hires, and clinical results from New England area biotechs this week. —Blueprint Medicines, a startup focused on developing personalized cancer treatments, said it nabbed a $40 million Series A financing led by Third Rock Ventures. Mark Levin and Alexis Borisy of Third Rock serve on board of directors at Blueprint, which is using molecular and cancer genome data and a proprietary chemical compound library to develop drugs more tailored to patients’ conditions. —Weston, MA-based Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) said that its oral multiple sclerosis drug candidate, dimethyl fumarate (BG-12), met its main goal in a pivotal study of 1,200 patients, by reducing MS flare-ups over two years compared with a placebo. The treatment also met its secondary goals, like slowing the rate of disability from the neurodegenerative disorder. —Aveo Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: AVEO), a Cambridge, MA-based drug developer working on an advanced treatment for kidney cancer, said that it added Henri Termeer to its board of directors. Termeer will be leaving his role as chairman and CEO of Genzyme (NASDAQ: GENZ) now that Sanofi-Aventis has completed its $20.1 billion buyout of the biotech. —Enlight Biosciences, a Boston-based firm founded to aid Big Pharma with R&D challenges, added Roche veteran Michelle Browner as CEO. Enlight founding CEO David Steinberg, a partner at Boston-based venture firm PureTech Ventures, will remain on the company’s board. —Brighton, MA-based surface engineering and nanotechnology provider Nano Terra said it acquired Surface Logix, also of Brighton. Both firms were founded by Harvard University chemist George Whitesides. The acquisition will enable Surface Logix, a drug developer, to apply the Nano Terra technology to healthcare products. —MIT spinout Taris Biomedical added $18.3 million in a financing led by new investor Third Rock. The money will go to advancing the company’s lead drug, a potential treatment for a number of bladder ailments, into mid-stage clinical trials. —Monsanto (NYSE: MON) said it was partnering with Cambridge-based Atlas Venture to find life sciences investments complementing Monsanto’s agriculture business. The were no financial terms disclosed for the multi-year collaboration, in which Atlas will help Monsanto scout investments in the areas of genomics, informatics, and biology, and Atlas will gain insight and technology to make its own future investments. —Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, a Cambridge-based developer of cancer treatments, announced it had raised $77 million in Series G funding from new and existing investors, which include Crocker Ventures, Jennison Associates, TPG-Axon Capital, and WT Investment Advisors Fund.


News Article | April 12, 2011
Site: www.xconomy.com

Nano Terra, a Brighton, MA-based company that works with industry on surface engineering and nanotechnology projects, said today that it has acquired the drug developer Surface Logix. The terms and details of the deal were not disclosed. Harvard University chemist George Whitesides (an Xconomist) is a founder of both Nano Terra and Surface Logix. “Surface Logix is an excellent fit for Nano Terra since our business was also built on intellectual property from the Whitesides lab,” said Myer Berlow, CEO of Nano Terra, in a statement. “We think we can achieve significant synergies through our proven co-development model. This acquisition opens the door to the use of Nano Terra’s technology in a variety of healthcare products.”


News Article | March 9, 2009
Site: www.xconomy.com

Surface Logix got a new CEO on board last fall, and five months later it has nailed down a load of new cash. The Brighton, MA-based biotech company, which uses an unusual chemical trick to treat obesity and diabetes, has secured $20 million to see if it can prove its experimental drugs work in human beings. The Series E financing, being announced today, is coming in the form of $15 million in venture capital and a $5 million loan. The equity backers include Arch Venture Partners, HBM BioVentures, Healthcare Focus, Intel Capital, Saudi Venture Development, Unilever Technology Ventures, and Venrock Associates. The venture loan comes from Silicon Valley Bank. This shot of cash comes less than six months into the tenure of Surface Logix’s new CEO Keith Dionne. He sold his previous company, Cambridge, MA-based Alantos Pharmaceuticals, to Amgen for $300 million. His new mission will be to lead this venture through a critical proving ground, pushing its top drug candidate through a pair of clinical trials for obesity and diabetes that should yield results by the end of the year. If the investors’ hunch is right, Surface Logix will be able to show its chemists have made the first drug that can block fat from being absorbed in the body, without causing the sort of liver-damaging side effects that plagued similar efforts at drug giants like Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson. The prize for anyone who comes up with a truly effective and safe obesity drug is huge—about two-thirds of Americans are estimated to be overweight or obese. “These are darn good programs,” Dionne says. “These are big markets, the drugs are novel, no one’s done it before, and they’re wholly owned by the company.” Surface Logix, which has about 35 employees, got its start in 2001 with technology from the prolific Harvard University chemistry lab of George Whitesides. The idea is that if medicinal chemists could borrow some of the techniques from their relatives in physical chemistry, by modifying the surface of conventional small-molecule oral drugs, they might be able to better control how drugs interact with proteins the drugs need to block in the body, Dionne says. The lead drug candidate that will test this idea is SLX-4090. This oral drug is designed to block something called the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). This protein, found in the cells that line the intestines, has the important job of helping transport fatty cholesterols, triglycerides, and other nutrients so they get absorbed from the gut into the body, where, sadly, the fat often gets stored. Scientists have tried blocking this critical gateway protein before with small-molecule drugs, but the problem was that the drug got absorbed throughout the bloodstream, and ended up trapping too much fat in the liver where the drug gets broken down, Dionne says. This caused all sorts of worrisome liver damage, like cirrhosis. “It was unacceptable,” Dionne says. Surface Logix thinks it has a better idea, because its drug will never travel to the liver. This compound … Next Page »


News Article | July 16, 2010
Site: www.xconomy.com

Surface Logix, a Brighton, MA-based developer of drugs for obesity and diabetes, pulled in $4 million in an offering of equity, options, and warrants that could total $4.6 million, according to an SEC filing. The startup, which launched in 2001 with technology from Harvard chemist George Whitesides, raised $20 million in Series E funding last year, with backing from Arch Venture Partners, HBM BioVentures, Healthcare Focus, Intel Capital, Saudi Venture Development, Unilever Technology Ventures, and Venrock Associates.The filing for the newest funding for Surface lists 17 investors.

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