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Gokdemir Y.,Marmara University | Cakir E.,Bezmialem Foundation University | Kut A.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital | Erdem E.,Marmara University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health | Year: 2013

Background Persistent or recurrent pneumonia in children can pose a significant challenge to paediatricians and respiratory physicians. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the role of flexible bronchoscopy (FB) in evaluation of recurrent or persistent pneumonia that remain otherwise unexplained by non-invasive diagnostic tests in children. Methods Retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent FB with an indication of recurrent or persistent pneumonia from 1997 to 2011. Results Among 2600 FB procedures, 434 (17%) were performed with the indication of recurrent or persistent pneumonia. There were 237 (54%) boys. Median age at presentation was 84 months, and median duration of symptoms was 9 months. FB led to specific diagnosis in 33% of the cases. The most common diseases diagnosed by FB were malacia disorders (n: 32, 7%), aspirated foreign body (n: 30, 7%), endobronchial tuberculosis (n: 20, 5%), congenital airway anomalies (n: 14, 3%), mucus plugs (n: 14, 3%), pulmonary haemosiderosis (n: 12, 3%) and middle lobe syndrome (n: 11, 3%). During FB, only 6% of the patients had minor complications such as transient hypoxia, stridor and tachycardia. Conclusions In our study, FB proved to be a safe and effective tool in evaluation of children with persistent or recurrent pneumonia. FB is indicated for children with recurrent or persistent pneumonia where the underlying diagnosis remains unclear even after non-invasive diagnostic tests. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians). Source


Sulu E.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital
Monaldi archives for chest disease = Archivio Monaldi per le malattie del torace / Fondazione clinica del lavoro, IRCCS [and] Istituto di clinica tisiologica e malattie apparato respiratorio, Università di Napoli, Secondo ateneo | Year: 2012

A 61-year-old non-smoking Turkish woman presented with chest pain for 10 months. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a solitary, relatively well circumscribed, heterogeneous mass of 4 x 6 cm diameter in left posterior-lateral hemithorax. On thoracotomy, an extraparanchymal mass destructing the ribs was determined. Mass excision and partial chest wall resection were performed. On histopathologic examination, this mass showed features of the hyaline vascular type of Castleman's disease. Source


Cakir E.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital
Pediatric pulmonology | Year: 2010

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare cause of chronic lung disease in children. A 7-year-old girl who attended our clinics with cough and sputum lasting for 5 years, has been evaluated for bilateral alveolar infiltration and ground-glass opacities. Peripheral eosinophilia was detected in total cell blood count. Flexible bronchoscopy showed mucous plugs. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and cell block of mucous plugs determined hypereosinophilia. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was confirmed after the elimination of other eosinophilic lung diseases and the case was accepted to be idiopathic. She showed a dramatic response to oral corticosteroids. This is the first reported case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia presenting with mucous plugs in children described to date in the literature. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Source


Kut A.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital | Cakir E.,Bezmialem Foundation University | Midyat L.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital
Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology | Year: 2012

Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by inflammation and destruction of cartilaginous tissue. Atypical initial symptoms and signs may cause difficulties in the diagnosis of RP for pediatricians. In this article, we report a 9-year-old male who presented with stridor and hoarseness indicating upper respiratory tract involvement in the setting of chronic polyarthralgia. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed subglottic stenosis. Increasing awareness of early respiratory manifestations of RP will prevent life-threatening complications. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source


Midyat L.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital | Cakir E.,Bezmialem Foundation University | Kut A.,Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Investigation Hospital
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2012

Objectives: Rapid anatomical evaluation is essential to establish the severity of cases with upper respiratory obstruction and to define the degree of respiratory distress. Detailed airway endoscopy is required in most patients, not only for diagnosis, but also to treat the condition.. In this study, as two of the largest paediatric pulmonology centres in Turkey, we reviewed the data of our bronchoscopy patients, and aimed to document the upper airway abnormalities that we detected during these procedures. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was made of the records of 1076 paediatric cases with pulmonary/airway disease who had undergone flexible bronchoscopy between 2007 and 2011. Results: Upper airway malacia disorders were the most common (79.6%, n= 259) bronchoscopic findings detected in the patients. The other most common pathologies were laryngeal edema (12.9%, n= 42), external tracheal compression (12.3%, n= 40), subglottic stenosis (4.0%, n= 13), tracheal stenosis (2.8%, n= 9), and vocal cord paralysis/irregularity (2.8%, n= 9). The mean duration of symptoms was shortest in patients with vocal cord paralysis, and longest in patients with tracheal nodules (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Paediatricians should keep in mind the possibility of malacia disorders and other congenital and acquired upper airway abnormalities in children with chronic respiratory problems. Diagnosis of underlying diseases, as soon as possible, permits the withdrawal of antibiotics or antiasthmatic drugs often used unnecessarily for long periods to treat these children. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source

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