Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center

Sūrat, India

Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center

Sūrat, India

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Shukla R.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Patel T.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Gupte S.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Year: 2015

Background: Storage time of blood components plays a major role in the accumulation of cytokines causing adverse transfusion reactions. Aims: The aim was to study the trend in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation, normal T-cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) during storage of whole blood (WB) and red cell concentrate (RCC) and to study the effect of leukoreduction (LR). Materials and Methods: WB sample was taken on 0, 7, 14, 21, and between 28 and 35 days and plasma aliquots were frozen. Samples from RCC and buffy-coat depleted RCC prepared using Optipress II were collected on 0, 7, 14, 21 and between 28 and 35 days. Cytokine estimation was done using ELISA development kits. Normal range of cytokines was established using 0 day samples of WB. Statistical analysis was done using nonparametric tests. Results and Conclusion: The normal range of IL-6 was 0-23 pg/ml, IL-8 0-12 pg/ml, TNF-α 0-3 pg/ml, and RANTES 1200-2000 pg/ml. IL-6 was in normal range and showed a decreasing trend during storage. IL-8 levels increased significantly from 0 to 35 days. In RCC, the highest level was 480 pg/ml on 28 th day. It was in the normal range in buffy-coat depleted RCC up to 28 days. RANTES level was significantly low in buffy-coat depleted RCC compared to RCC. We conclude that WB has high levels of IL-8 and RANTES. The levels of cytokines are affected by storage period and LR. Comparison of WB and buffy-coat depleted RCC shows significantly low levels of IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES in buffy-coat depleted RCC. This study emphasizes the use of red cell components instead of WB and buffy-coat depleted RCC instead of RCC. © 2015 Asian Journal of Transfusion Science.


Joshi S.R.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Naik R.A.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Gupte S.C.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Year: 2015

Background: Cold agglutinins (CA) are benign naturally occurring low titer autoantibodies present in most individuals. Those with moderate strength are found in infections, malignancies or autoimmune conditions with diagnostic importance. Aim: Present report deals with CA that brought spontaneous hemagglutination in blood units stored at 2-6°C. Study design: Over 32 months period between July 1993 and December 1995, blood units were inspected for spontaneous cold auto-hemagglutination (SpCA) phenomenon. The plasma from these units was separated and investigated for serological specificity using in house red cell panel and standard serological methods. Results: Among 51,671 blood units, 112 units showed SpCA phenomenon. A rising trend seen in first half of study period significantly fell in remaining half. Specificities of the antibodies detected include anti-I (27), anti-i (53), anti-Pr (21) with remaining few being undetermined specificity. Absorption of serum using enzyme-treated red cells revealed a presence of anti-Pr among the cases, the two of which with new specificities that reacted preferentially with red cells from either new-born or adults and were tentatively named as anti-Pr Fetal and anti-Pr adult , respectively. While 9 cases showed optimum reaction at neutral pH of 7, 68 (62%) cases reacted at pH 5.8 through 8.0, 28 (26%) cases preferred an acidic pH 5.8 and 4 cases opted an alkaline pH 8. Of 28 cases with antibodies preferentially reacting in acidic medium, 17 (60%) cases were anti-i and 7 (25%) cases were anti-Pr. Conclusion: Unique SpCA phenomenon observed in blood units stored under blood bank conditions seems to be due to CA developed in response to vector-borne infectious agents. Majority of the cases displayed their specificities, otherwise are rare to be encountered. © 2015 Asian Journal of Transfusion Science.


Ali S.,KEM Hospital | Shetty S.,KEM Hospital | Ghosh K.,KEM Hospital | Ghosh K.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases | Year: 2016

Inherited macrothrombocytopenia is a subgroup of thrombocytopenias, and is characterised by the presence of giant platelets and decreased platelet count with variable bleeding manifestations. Bengal macrothrombocytopenia is a newly described entity, previously called asymptomatic constitutional macrothrombocytopenia (ACMT), presented with variable bleeding tendencies; with mild to severe thrombocytopenia and macro-platelets in their peripheral blood smear and it is not totally an innocuous condition as described previously. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Pathak V.A.,KEM Hospital | Ghosh K.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Anemia | Year: 2016

Anemia is the primary clinical manifestation of malarial infections and is responsible for the substantial rate of morbidity. The pathophysiology discussed till now catalogued several causes for malarial anemia among which ineffective erythropoiesis being remarkable one occurs silently in the bone marrow. A systematic literature search was performed and summarized information on erythropoietic response upon malaria infection and the factors responsible for the same. This review summarizes the clinical and experimental studies on patients, mouse models, and in vitro cell cultures reporting erythropoietic changes upon malaria infection as well as factors accountable for the same. Inadequate erythropoietic response during malaria infection may be the collective effect of various mediators generated by host immune response as well as parasite metabolites. The interplay between various modulators causing the pathophysiology needs to be explored further. Globin gene expression profiling upon malaria infection should also be looked into as abnormal production of globin chains could be a possible contributor to ineffective erythropoiesis. © 2016 Vrushali A. Pathak and Kanjaksha Ghosh.


Antony H.A.,Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research | Pathak V.,National Institute of Immunohaematology NII | Parija S.C.,Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research | Ghosh K.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Bhattacherjee A.,SciGenom Labs Pvt. Ltd.
Genomics Data | Year: 2016

The emergence and distribution of drug resistance in malaria are serious public health concerns in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. However, the molecular mechanism of drug resistance remains unclear. In the present study, we performed a high-throughput RNA-Seq to identify and characterize the differentially expressed genes between the chloroquine (CQ) sensitive (3D7) and resistant (Dd2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite cells were cultured in the presence and absence of CQ by in vitro method. Total RNA was isolated from the harvested parasite cells using TRIzol, and RNA-Seq was conducted using an Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform with paired-end reads and annotated using Tophat. The transcriptome analysis of P. falciparum revealed the expression of ~. 5000 genes, in which ~ 60% of the genes have unknown function. Cuffdiff program was used to identify the differentially expressed genes between the CQ-sensitive and resistant strains. Here, we furnish a detailed description of the experimental design, procedure, and analysis of the transcriptome sequencing data, that have been deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (accession nos. PRJNA308455 and GSE77499). © 2016 The Authors.


Antony H.A.,Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research | Pathak V.,KEM Hospital Campus | Ghosh K.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Parija S.C.,Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research
Tropical Parasitology | Year: 2016

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the protein expression patterns of Plasmodium falciparum extracellular and intracellular proteins separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) from the chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) MRC2 strain and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) RKL9 strain. Materials and Methods: Both the extracellular protein (ECP) and intracellular protein (ICP) were extracted and solubilized. The proteins were separated by 2-DE, first based on their charges using isoelectric focusing and then their sizes by electrophoresis. The separated protein spots were detected by silver staining, and further, the protein spot density was analyzed by an image analysis software. Results: 2-DE separated the proteins extracted from the CQS and CQR strains based on their differentially expressed protein patterns. Extracellular Protein Analysis: A total of 109 and 77 protein spots were detected by image analysis of ECP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. There was a marked reduction in protein expression pattern in the CQR strain when compared with the CQS strain. Interestingly, 50 and 18 protein spots were uniquely expressed in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. When MRC2 strain-expressed proteins were taken as the control, 12 upregulated and 14 downregulated protein spots were observed in the RKL9 strain-extracted proteins. Intracellular Protein Analysis: ICP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains showed 187 and 199 protein spots by an image analysis software, and a small enhancement of protein expression was measured when comparing the CQR strain with CQS strain. There were 67 and 79 unique protein spots detected in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. A total of 120 protein spots were similar when MRC2 proteins were taken as the control; among these protein spots, 40 upregulated and 22 downregulated protein spots were detected in RKL9 strain-expressed protein. Conclusions: Both these unique and matched protein spots might be molecularly potent drug targets for chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum. Further identification of these proteins by mass spectrometry/peptide sequencing is essential to clearly understand the mechanism of resistance. © 2016 Tropical Parasitology.


Gupte S.C.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Patel A.G.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Patel T.G.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Journal of Vector Borne Diseases | Year: 2012

Background & objectives: Literature reports several studies on ABO groups and malaria but a study with an adequate sample size and controls is not available. ABO groups are genetically controlled, hence, large sample size and comparison with population frequency is essential. To determine whether malaria infection with variable severity has correlation with ABO groups. Study design & Methods: Blood samples of non-transfused malaria cases were obtained from pathology laboratories and transfused malaria patients' from Blood Bank. The malaria parasites were identified by examination of thick and thin smears. Control (normal population) included 11,303 students. Results: The ABO group frequency of normal population was 'O' 32.3%, 'A' 22.2%, 'B' 36.7% and 'AB' 8.8%. The overall ABO group distribution in 8028 malaria cases was 'O' 30%, 'A' 24.6%, 'B' 35.5% and 'AB' 8.9%. 'A' group incidence was significantly higher than normal ('A' vs non-'A' χ2 = 15, df=1, p <0.001). ABO group frequencies were comparable within Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria. There was no significant difference in ABO group distribution in malaria patients having severe anemia or among transfused and nontransfused malaria cases. About 32% of P. falciparum cerebral malaria cases and 36% DIC cases were of 'A' group. Compared to 22.2% 'A' group in the population, malaria cases showed preponderance of 'A' group. Because of the small numbers statistical evaluation was not done. Conclusion: 'A' blood group is more susceptible to have malaria infection and risk of cerebral malaria and DIC in malaria is also more in 'A' group individuals.


Bhukhanvala D.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Gupte S.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Patel A.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Shah A.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center | Sorathiya S.,Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Indian Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2012

Background: From the data of transfusion-dependent thalassemia major cases, the 4 communities (Muslim, Dhodia Patel, Kachhiya Patel, and Modh Bania) with high prevalence but not studied methodically were selected. Aim: The aim of this study is to find prevalence of -thalassemia and sickle cell anemia in 4 selected communities and also to evaluate hematological profile in them. Materials and Methods: For screening of -thalassemia trait (BTT) and sickle cell trait (SCT), all samples were tested for red cell indices, solubility, HbA 2 level and doubtful cases confirmed on HPLC. Statistical Analysis: Mean SD, 2 and ′t′ tests were used to evaluate the significance. Results and Conclusion: Among 4 selected communities, the highest prevalence of BTT was observed in Modh Bania (6.2%) and Kachhiya Patel (6.05%) and that of SCT in Dhodia Patel (14.0%). Significantly higher prevalence of BTT was observed in Memon ( P < 0.0001) and of SCT in Khalifa 6.6% ( P < 0.0001) compared to other Muslim sub castes. Anemia was more prevalent in BTT compared to non-BTT and non-SCT subjects. 80% of Dhodia Patel non-BTT and non-SCT subjects showed microcytic red cell morphology. Their Mean SD Hb concentration was 12.1 1.73, hence iron deficiency cannot be a sole reason. This community needs -thalassemia and iron studies.


PubMed | National Institute of Immunohaematology ICMR and Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center
Type: | Journal: Journal of clinical laboratory analysis | Year: 2016

Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by increased iron absorption.HFE gene mutations C282Y and H63D are responsible for the majority of hereditary hemochromatosis cases.We tried to look at the effect of HFE mutations on the iron status. A total of 100 thalassemia traits (BTT) with 100 normal individuals were screened for the C282Y and H63D mutations using PCR-RFLP. The serum ferritin levels were determined using ELISA kit.We did not find the C282Y mutation in our study group. The allelic frequencies for H63D mutation did not differ significantly between -thalassemia traits (8.5%) and normal controls (9%). with H63D genotype of H/D (143.16 80.3 ng/ml) and D/D (504 ng/ml) showed higher ferritin levels as against H/H genotype (88.64 92.43 ng/ml). The statistically significant difference was observed in the mean serum ferritin levels among the individuals showing H/H and D/D genotypes (P < 0.002) and H/D and D/D genotype (P < 0.01) in both the groups.This suggests that iron load in BTT tends to aggravated with the co-inheritance of the H63D mutation. The mutant H63D gene showed the presence of haplotype 6 which is reported in the European population suggesting a common origin.


PubMed | Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Surat Raktadan Kendra and Research Center and KEM Hospital Campus
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical parasitology | Year: 2016

The objective of this study was to compare the protein expression patterns of 2-DE separated the proteins extracted from the CQS and CQR strains based on their differentially expressed protein patterns.A total of 109 and 77 protein spots were detected by image analysis of ECP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. There was a marked reduction in protein expression pattern in the CQR strain when compared with the CQS strain. Interestingly, 50 and 18 protein spots were uniquely expressed in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. When MRC2 strain-expressed proteins were taken as the control, 12 upregulated and 14 downregulated protein spots were observed in the RKL9 strain-extracted proteins.ICP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains showed 187 and 199 protein spots by an image analysis software, and a small enhancement of protein expression was measured when comparing the CQR strain with CQS strain. There were 67 and 79 unique protein spots detected in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. A total of 120 protein spots were similar when MRC2 proteins were taken as the control; among these protein spots, 40 upregulated and 22 downregulated protein spots were detected in RKL9 strain-expressed protein.Both these unique and matched protein spots might be molecularly potent drug targets for chloroquine resistance in

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