Supportive Care in Cancer Unit

Milano, Italy

Supportive Care in Cancer Unit

Milano, Italy

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Ripamonti C.I.,Supportive Care in Cancer Unit | Maniezzo M.,Dental Team | Boldini S.,Supportive Care in Cancer Unit | Pessi M.A.,Supportive Care in Cancer Unit | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Bone Oncology | Year: 2012

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) is an adverse event reported especially in patients receiving cancer treatments regimen, bisphosphonates (BPs), and denosumab. We performed an open-label, prospective study in patients treated with zoledronic acid who developed ONJ lesions > 2.5 cm, and had no benefit after the treatment with the standard therapy, to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of medical ozone (O3) treatment delivered as gas insufflations on each ONJ lesions. Twenty-four patients (mean age 62.5, range 41-80; 12 female) with bone metastases due to breast (11), prostate (4)and lung (4)cancers, myeloma (2), or osteoporosis (3), previously treated with zoledronic acid and not underwent dental preventive measures and with ONJ lesions > 2.5 cm, were observed and treated with topical O3 gas insufflation every third day for a minimum of 10 for each pathological area or till necrotic bone sequestrum or surgery. We used a special insufflation bell-shaped device adjusted to the specific characteristics of the patient, capable of eliminating any residue of O3 diffusion by degrading it and releasing O 2 into the air. Azithromicin 500 mg/day was administered for 10 days in all patients before the first three gas insufflation although they had previously received various cycles of antibiotics. Ten patients required more than 10 O3 gas insufflations due to multiple lesions and/or purulent sovrainfections; one patient received two further O3 insufflations while waiting the day of surgery. Six of 24 patients interrupted the O 3 gas therapy for oncological disease progression (five patients) and for fear of an experimental therapy (one patient). Six patients had the sequestrum and complete or partial (one patient) spontaneous expulsion of the necrotic bone followed by oral mucosa re-epithelization after a range of 4-27 of O3 gas insufflations. No patient reported adverse events. In 12 patients with the largest and deeper ONJ lesions, O3 gas therapy produced the sequestrum of the necrotic bone after 10 to 38 insufflations; surgery was necessary to remove it (11 patients). Of interest, removal was possible without the resection of healthy mandible edge because of the presence of bone sequestrum. All together the response rate was 75.0% (95% CI, 53.3-90.2%) in ITT analysis and 100% (95% CI, 81.5-100%) in the PP analysis. In all patients treated with O3 gas ± surgery, no ONJ relapse appeared (follow-up mean 18 months, range 1-3 years). Medical O3 gas insufflations is an effective and safe treatment for patients treated with BPs who developed ONJ lesions > 2.5 cm. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Medical Statistic and Biometry Unit, Supportive Care in Cancer Unit and Dental Team
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of bone oncology | Year: 2016

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) is an adverse event reported especially in patients receiving cancer treatments regimen, bisphosphonates (BPs), and denosumab. We performed an open-label, prospective study in patients treated with zoledronic acid who developed ONJ lesions >2.5cm, and had no benefit after the treatment with the standard therapy, to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of medical ozone (O3) treatment delivered as gas insufflations on each ONJ lesions. Twenty-four patients (mean age 62.5, range 41-80; 12 female) with bone metastases due to breast (11), prostate (4)and lung (4)cancers, myeloma (2), or osteoporosis (3), previously treated with zoledronic acid and not underwent dental preventive measures and with ONJ lesions >2.5cm, were observed and treated with topical O3 gas insufflation every third day for a minimum of 10 for each pathological area or till necrotic bone sequestrum or surgery. We used a special insufflation bell-shaped device adjusted to the specific characteristics of the patient, capable of eliminating any residue of O3 diffusion by degrading it and releasing O2 into the air. Azithromicin 500mg/day was administered for 10 days in all patients before the first three gas insufflation although they had previously received various cycles of antibiotics. Ten patients required more than 10 O3 gas insufflations due to multiple lesions and/or purulent sovrainfections; one patient received two further O3 insufflations while waiting the day of surgery. Six of 24 patients interrupted the O3 gas therapy for oncological disease progression (five patients) and for fear of an experimental therapy (one patient). Six patients had the sequestrum and complete or partial (one patient) spontaneous expulsion of the necrotic bone followed by oral mucosa re-epithelization after a range of 4-27 of O3 gas insufflations. No patient reported adverse events. In 12 patients with the largest and deeper ONJ lesions, O3 gas therapy produced the sequestrum of the necrotic bone after 10 to 38 insufflations; surgery was necessary to remove it (11 patients). Of interest, removal was possible without the resection of healthy mandible edge because of the presence of bone sequestrum. All together the response rate was 75.0% (95% CI, 53.3-90.2%) in ITT analysis and 100% (95% CI, 81.5-100%) in the PP analysis. In all patients treated with O3 gas surgery, no ONJ relapse appeared (follow-up mean 18 months, range 1-3 years). Medical O3 gas insufflations is an effective and safe treatment for patients treated with BPs who developed ONJ lesions >2.5cm. Short abstract: ONJ is an adverse event reported in patients receiving cancer treatments regimen, bisphosphonates and denosumab. We performed an open-label, prospective study in 24 patients with solid tumours, myeloma or osteoporosis due to hormonal therapy, treated with zoledronic acid without previuos preventive dental screening, who developed ONJ lesions >2.5cm, and had no benefit after standard therapy, to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of medical ozone (O3) treatment delivered as gas insufflations on each ONJ lesions. The patients were treated with O3 every third day for a minimum of 10 for each pathological area or till necrotic bone sequestrum or surgery. Eleven patients required more than ten O3 gas insufflations. Six of 24 patients interrupted the therapy for oncological disease progression. Six patients had the sequestrum and complete or partial (one patient) spontaneous expulsion of the necrotic bone followed by oral mucosa re-epithelization after a range of 4 to 27 of O3 gas insufflations. No patient reported adverse events. In 12 patients with the largest and deeper ONJ lesions, O3 gas therapy produced the sequestrum of the necrotic bone after 10 to 38 insufflations; surgery was necessary to remove it (11 patients). Of interest, removal was possible without the resection of healthy mandible edge because of the presence of bone sequestrum. All together the response rate was 75.0% (95% CI, 53.3-90.2%) in ITT analysis and 100% (95% CI, 81.5-100%) in the PP analysis. In all patients treated with O3 gas surgery, no ONJ relapse appeared (follow-up mean 18 months, range 1-3 years).


Vignaroli E.,Hospital Tornu | Vignaroli E.,FEMEBA Foundation | Bennett M.I.,University of Leeds | Nekolaichuk C.,University of Alberta | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Palliative Medicine | Year: 2012

The aim of this study was to determine by consensus the components of an opioid essential prescription package (OEPP) to be used when initiating a prescription for the control of moderate to severe chronic pain. Palliative care physicians (n=60) were sampled from the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) membership list to represent a range of countries of varying economic levels and diverse geographical regions. Using a Delphi study method, physicians were asked to rank preferences of drug and dosing schedule for first-line opioid, antiemetic, and laxative for the treatment of adults with chronic pain due to cancer and other life-threatening conditions. Overall response rates after two Delphi survey rounds were 95% (n=57) and 82% (n=49), respectively. A consensus (set at ≥75% agreement) was reached to include morphine as first-line opioid at a dose of 5mg orally every 4 hours. Consensus was reached to include metoclopramide as a first-line antiemetic, but there was no consensus on "regular" or "as needed" administration. No consensus was reached regarding a first-line laxative, but a combination of senna and docusate secured 59% agreement. There was consensus (93% agreement) that laxatives should always be given regularly when opioid treatment is started. Further work is needed to establish a recommended dose of metoclopramide and a type and dose of laxative. The resulting OEPP is international in scope and is designed to ensure that opioids are better tolerated by reducing adverse effects of opioids, which could lead to more sustained improvements in pain management. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Supportive Care in Cancer Unit, Head and Neck Medical Oncology Unit, Medical Oncology 1 Unit and Medical Day Hospital Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tumori | Year: 2015

There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence, intensity, and treatment of nausea and vomiting during the intercycle periods of chemotherapy (CHT). The aims of the study were to assess the incidence and intensity of intercycle nausea and vomiting, to assess the use of rescue antiemetic medications, and to define the more uncomfortable symptom between nausea and vomiting.In a prospective study, 108 chemotherapy-naive patients treated with highly or moderately emetogenic CHT for different primary cancers were enrolled. All patients filled out the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System tool before the first cycle of CHT (T0) and on 14-16 days thereafter for the first 3 cycles of CHT (i.e., T1, T2, T3).Sixty-seven patients completed the study. During CHT administration, all patients received antiemetics according to international guidelines. During the intercycle periods, nausea was reported in 6.0% of patients at T0, 10.5% at T1, and 26.9% at T2 and T3, respectively. The intensity of nausea was mild for 6.0%, 21%, and 18% of patients at T1, T2, and T3, respectively; moderate for 1.5%, 3.0%, and 6.0% at T1 to T3; and severe in only 3.0% of patients at any time. Vomiting was present in 1.5% and 10.5% of patients at T2 and T3. Rescue antiemetic medication was required for 41.8% at T1, 53% at T2, and 47.8% at T3. At the end of the study, 70.1% of patients described nausea as the more uncomfortable symptom compared to vomiting.Nausea has a higher burden of impact over vomiting and should be assessed and treated separately throughout multiple cycles of CHT.


Pessi M.A.,Supportive Care in Cancer Unit | Zilembo N.,Instituto Nazionale Tumori Of Milan | Haspinger E.R.,Instituto Nazionale Tumori Of Milan | Molino L.,Instituto Nazionale Tumori Of Milan | And 3 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2014

Purpose of research: Revision of the literature on targeted therapy-induced diarrhea (TT-ID). Principal results: TT-ID is frequent; the mechanisms are mainly secretive, followed by ischemic or autoimmune ones. The duration of TT-ID is protracted over time. Its intensity is of grade G1-G3 but may be fatal in patients with diffuse colitis or on ipilimumab. However, no specific guidelines are available on management of different grades of TT-ID. Preventive measures with antibiotics, probiotics or activated charcoal should be further investigated. Loperamide is the first choice drug followed by octreotide. The role of corticosteroids is controversial. Conclusion: Early assessment and management of TT-ID is essential to prevent the worsening of this side-effect, patients' hospitalization and dose reduction or oncological treatment discontinuation. Future research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of TT-ID and it should also be investigated whether a specific pharmacological and/or non pharmachological approach is indicated. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


PubMed | Supportive Care in Cancer Unit and Instituto Nazionale Tumori Of Milan
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Critical reviews in oncology/hematology | Year: 2014

Revision of the literature on targeted therapy-induced diarrhea (TT-ID).TT-ID is frequent; the mechanisms are mainly secretive, followed by ischemic or autoimmune ones. The duration of TT-ID is protracted over time. Its intensity is of grade G1-G3 but may be fatal in patients with diffuse colitis or on ipilimumab. However, no specific guidelines are available on management of different grades of TT-ID. Preventive measures with antibiotics, probiotics or activated charcoal should be further investigated. Loperamide is the first choice drug followed by octreotide. The role of corticosteroids is controversial.Early assessment and management of TT-ID is essential to prevent the worsening of this side-effect, patients hospitalization and dose reduction or oncological treatment discontinuation. Future research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of TT-ID and it should also be investigated whether a specific pharmacological and/or non pharmachological approach is indicated.

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