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News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

Dell EMC announced new high performance computing (HPC) cloud offerings, software, systems and customer success, continuing its focus on democratizing HPC for enterprises of all sizes, optimizing HPC technology innovations and advancing the HPC community. “The global HPC market forecast exceeds $30 billion in 2016 for all product and services spending, including servers, software, storage, cloud, and other categories, with continued growth expected at 5.2 percent CAGR through 2020,” said Addison Snell, CEO, Intersect360 Research. “Bolstered by its combination with EMC, Dell will hold the number-one position in total HPC revenue share heading into 2017.” As a global leader in high performance computing, Dell EMC continues to bring HPC capabilities to mainstream enterprises, announcing today: Dell EMC, as the global leader in server shipments, enterprise storage and converged systems, offers a robust portfolio optimized for HPC, available all in one place. New examples of innovative HPC technology being demonstrated at SC16 this week include: Advancing the HPC Community, Enabling Customers to Accelerate Pace of Innovation MIT Lincoln Laboratory Supercomputing Center (LLSC) has selected Dell EMC to install a 648-node HPC system through the Dell EMC and Intel early access program for the Intel® Xeon Phi™ processor. LLSC’s new “TX-Green” system, one of the largest of its kind on the US East Coast, exceeds one petaflop and has provided the center with a 4X computing capacity boost. The new HPC system provides the LLSC’s researchers and collaborators a dramatic increase in its interactive, on-demand HPC and big data capabilities to enable research in fields such as space observations, robotic vehicles, cyber security, machine learning, sensor processing, electronic devices, bioinformatics, and air traffic control. Peking University has selected Dell EMC to install two HPC clusters to further cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) cooperative research with Harvard University. These clusters, with 144 nodes and approximately two petabytes of storage with Intel EE Lustre, will enable university researchers to map the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules to design inhibitors and develop new drugs to treat or cure patients of cancer and other diseases. Jim Ganthier, senior vice president, Validated Solutions and HPC Organization, Dell EMC “Dell EMC is uniquely capable of breaking through the barriers of data-centric HPC and navigating new and varied workloads that are converging with big data and cloud. We are collaborating with the HPC community, including our customers, to advance and optimize HPC innovations while making these capabilities easily accessible and deployable for organizations and businesses of all sizes.” Jeremy Kepner, MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow and head of the Lincoln Laboratory Supercomputing Center “Dell EMC has been a great partner in enabling us to dramatically increase the capabilities of our supercomputing center. The Dell HPC team was very knowledgeable and responsive and able to deliver, install, and benchmark our Petaflop-scale system in less than a month. This was a great example of a well-coordinated and dedicated organization that was able to allocate the appropriate resources to exceed customer expectations.” Dr. Youdong “Jack” Mao, Assistant Professor of Biophysics, Peking University “The HPC clusters from Dell EMC are critical to our research missions that highly depend on the analysis of big data generated from highly automated cryo-electron microscopes. The HPC systems facilitate the development of state-of-the-art algorithms in pursuit of structural solutions to those grand biomedical problems, which would deliver innovations in cancer immunotherapy and precision medicine.” Jason Stowe, CEO, Cycle Computing “Hybrid solutions are the future for HPC customers and teaming with Dell EMC to meet that need is very exciting. The Dell EMC team clearly understands this market and their customers. With their unique insight, we believe our combined forces will deliver real value to customers, enabling them to significantly reduce their queue times, instant access to increased capacity when needed, and the ability to easily manage it all.” Charles Wuischpard, vice president, Data Center Group, Intel “We’re entering an era where personalized medicine can help to save and improve lives like never before. We continue to collaborate with Dell on bringing Intel Scalable System Framework based clusters to market, and the Dell EMC PowerEdge C6320p server, based on Intel Xeon Phi processor, Intel® HPC Orchestrator, and Intel Omni-path Architecture fabric, will help customers solve some of the most important life science and deep learning challenges.” Ian Buck, vice president of accelerated computing, NVIDIA “The NVIDIA Tesla P100 is the most powerful GPU accelerator ever built for high performance computing, big data analytics and artificial intelligence. We are working with Dell EMC to target some of the world’s most complex visual computing problems in life sciences, research, and A.I., and the PowerEdge C4130 and R730 servers were built to supercharge these applications.”


In the background is the JUQUEEN supercomputer at the Jülich Supercomputing Center (JSC). Credit: Copyright: Jülich Research Center Alpha particles, as the nuclei of the helium atom are also called, play a decisive role in the formation of heavier elements. Carbon, for instance, is formed from the fusion of these alpha particles. If another helium nucleus is added, oxygen is formed - another prerequisite for the development of life on Earth. In the current issue of the journal Nature, an international team of researchers is now presenting a new method using supercomputers to create detailed simulations of these birth processes inside stars. The method reduces the computational effort required and for the first time makes it possible, using the Jülich supercomputer JUQUEEN, to do a complete calculation of the scattering process of two alpha particles. The simulation of the processes that lead to the formation of heavier elements requires great computing power. Even the fastest supercomputers in the world are just able to model the creation of the very light elements. All the protons and neutrons flying around, from which the atomic nuclei are created, interact with one another. In addition, the wide range of theoretically possible quantum states of each particle must be taken into account. The requisite computational power thus rises exponentially as the number of particles involved increases. For this reason, so-called ab-initio simulations have thus far been restricted to reactions in which no more than five particles are involved. Such simulation methods are done without additional experimentally determinable parameters. The findings made are thus based only upon the fundamental laws of physics. With the help of a new computational method, scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Bochum, the Jülich research center, and two American universities have now succeeded in modeling a much more complex process. They examined the scattering, or deflection, of two helium nuclei: a reaction that encompasses a total of 8 nucleons - which is the overall term for protons and neutrons. For their calculations, they used one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, the JUQUEEN supercomputer at the Jülich Supercomputing Center (JSC). To reduce the enormous computational effort, they used a trick: The researchers placed the nucleons involved not in free space, but on a virtual matrix (the so-called lattice), the state of which can be calculated very efficiently with a large number of parallel processors, as are now being used in supercomputers. In this way, the computational time is not (as has previously been the case) increased exponentially with the number of nucleons involved, but is instead only quadratic. The computational time for a system with 16 particles is thus only four times greater than for an 8-particle system. In contrast, if the computational time increased exponentially, a supercomputer such as JUQUEEN would not be occupied for a few weeks, but for several thousand years. A few years ago, physicists unlocked the secret of the basic conditions for the formation of carbon; the new method now takes researchers tangibly close to another vital creation process: the formation of oxygen, which has been called the "Holy Grail of astrophysics". Furthermore, the method could also open up new perspectives for simulation calculations in elementary particle physics, in which the focus is not on atomic nuclei but on the behavior of quarks and gluons.


News Article | January 11, 2016
Site: phys.org

The new system, named Cheyenne, will be installed this year at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) and become operational at the beginning of 2017. Cheyenne will be built by Silicon Graphics International Corp. (SGI) in conjunction with centralized file system and data storage components provided by DataDirect Networks (DDN). The SGI high-performance computer will be a 5.34-petaflop system, meaning it can carry out 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second. It will be capable of more than 2.5 times the amount of scientific computing performed by Yellowstone, the current NCAR supercomputer. Funded by the National Science Foundation and the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming, Cheyenne will be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires, and other important geoscience topics. Since the supercomputing facility in Wyoming opened its doors in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "We're excited to bring more supercomputing power to the scientific community," said Anke Kamrath, director of operations and services at NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory. "Whether it's the threat of solar storms or a heightened risk in certain severe weather events, this new system will help lead to improved predictions and strengthen society's resilience to potential disasters." "Researchers at the University of Wyoming will make great use of the new system as they continue their work into better understanding such areas as the surface and subsurface flows of water and other liquids, cloud processes, and the design of wind energy plants," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "UW's relationship with NCAR through the NWSC has greatly strengthened our scientific computing and data-centric research. It's helping us introduce the next generation of scientists and engineers to these endeavors." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support that it has received from the people of that city. It also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne nation. The new data storage system for Cheyenne will be integrated with NCAR's existing GLADE file system. The DDN storage will provide an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives. This, combined with the current 16 petabytes of GLADE, will total 36 petabytes of high-speed storage. The new DDN system also will transfer data at the rate of 200 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the current file system's rate of 90 gigabytes per second. The system will include powerful Intel Xeon processors, whose performance will be augmented through optimization work that has been done by NCAR and the University of Colorado Boulder. NCAR and the university performed this work through their participation in the Intel Parallel Computing Centers program. Even with its increased power, Cheyenne will be three times more energy efficient (in floating point operations per second, or flops, per watt) than Yellowstone, its predecessor, which is itself highly efficient. "The new system will have a peak computation rate of over 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of power consumed," said NCAR's Irfan Elahi, project manager of Cheyenne and section manager for high-end supercomputing services. High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex processes and how they might unfold in the future. These predictions give resource managers and policy experts valuable information for planning ahead and mitigating risk. Some of the areas in which Cheyenne is expected to accelerate research include the following: "Supercomputing is vital to NCAR's scientific research and applications, giving us a virtual laboratory in which we run experiments that would otherwise be impractical or impossible to do," said NCAR Director James Hurrell. "Cheyenne will be a key component of the research infrastructure of the United States through its provision of supercomputing specifically tailored for the atmospheric, geospace, and related sciences. The capabilities of this new system will be central to the continued improvement of our ability to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, air quality, and space weather, as well as their impacts on people, ecosystems, and society." Key features of the new Cheyenne supercomputer system: The new Cheyenne supercomputer and the existing file system are complemented by a new centralized parallel file system and data storage components. Key features of the new data storage system: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


News Article | January 11, 2016
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

BOULDER — The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) announced that it has selected its next supercomputer for advancing atmospheric and Earth science, following a competitive open procurement process. The new machine will help scientists lay the groundwork for improved predictions of a range of phenomena, from hour-by-hour risks associated with thunderstorm outbreaks to the timing of the 11-year solar cycle and its potential impacts on GPS and other sensitive technologies. The new system, named Cheyenne, will be installed this year at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) and become operational at the beginning of 2017. Cheyenne will be built by Silicon Graphics International (SGI) in conjunction with centralized file system and data storage components provided by DataDirect Networks (DDN). The SGI high-performance computer will be a 5.34-petaflop system, meaning it can carry out 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second. It will be capable of more than 2.5 times the amount of scientific computing performed by Yellowstone, the current NCAR supercomputer. Funded by the National Science Foundation and the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming, Cheyenne will be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires and other important geoscience topics. Since the supercomputing facility in Wyoming opened its doors in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. “We’re excited to bring more supercomputing power to the scientific community,” said Anke Kamrath, director of operations and services at NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory. “Whether it’s the threat of solar storms or a heightened risk in certain severe weather events, this new system will help lead to improved predictions and strengthen society’s resilience to potential disasters.” “Researchers at the University of Wyoming will make great use of the new system as they continue their work into better understanding such areas as the surface and subsurface flows of water and other liquids, cloud processes, and the design of wind energy plants,” said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. “UW’s relationship with NCAR through the NWSC has greatly strengthened our scientific computing and data-centric research. It’s helping us introduce the next generation of scientists and engineers to these endeavors.” The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support that it has received from the people of that city. It also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne nation. The new data storage system for Cheyenne will be integrated with NCAR’s existing GLADE file system. The DDN storage will provide an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives. This, combined with the current 16 petabytes of GLADE, will total 36 petabytes of high-speed storage. The new DDN system also will transfer data at the rate of 200 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the current file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. The system will include powerful Intel Xeon processors, whose performance will be augmented through optimization work that has been done by NCAR and the University of Colorado Boulder. NCAR and the university performed this work through their participation in the Intel Parallel Computing Centers program. Even with its increased power, Cheyenne will be three times more energy efficient (in floating point operations per second, or flops, per watt) than Yellowstone, its predecessor, which is itself highly efficient. “The new system will have a peak computation rate of over 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of power consumed," said NCAR’s Irfan Elahi, project manager of Cheyenne and section manager for high-end supercomputing services. High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex processes and how they might unfold in the future. These predictions give resource managers and policy experts valuable information for planning ahead and mitigating risk. Some of the areas in which Cheyenne is expected to accelerate research include the following: “Supercomputing is vital to NCAR’s scientific research and applications, giving us a virtual laboratory in which we run experiments that would otherwise be impractical or impossible to do,” said NCAR Director James Hurrell. “Cheyenne will be a key component of the research infrastructure of the United States through its provision of supercomputing specifically tailored for the atmospheric, geospace and related sciences. The capabilities of this new system will be central to the continued improvement of our ability to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, air quality and space weather, as well as their impacts on people, ecosystems and society.” Key features of the new Cheyenne supercomputer system: The new Cheyenne supercomputer and the existing file system are complemented by a new centralized parallel file system and data storage components. Key features of the new data storage system: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

At century's end, the number of summertime storms that produce extreme downpours could increase by more than 400 percent across parts of the United States -- including sections of the Gulf Coast, Atlantic Coast, and the Southwest -- according to a new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The study, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, also finds that the intensity of individual extreme rainfall events could increase by as much as 70 percent in some areas. That would mean that a storm that drops about 2 inches of rainfall today would be likely to drop nearly 3.5 inches in the future. "These are huge increases," said NCAR scientist Andreas Prein, lead author of the study. "Imagine the most intense thunderstorm you typically experience in a single season. Our study finds that, in the future, parts of the U.S. could expect to experience five of those storms in a season, each with an intensity as strong or stronger than current storms." The study was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), NCAR's sponsor, and the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America. "Extreme precipitation events affect our infrastructure through flooding, landslides and debris flows," said Anjuli Bamzai, program director in NSF's Directorate for Geosciences, which funded the research. "We need to better understand how these extreme events are changing. By supporting this research, NSF is working to foster a safer environment for all of us." An increase in extreme precipitation is one of the expected impacts of climate change because scientists know that as the atmosphere warms, it can hold more water, and a wetter atmosphere can produce heavier rain. In fact, an increase in precipitation intensity has already been measured across all regions of the U.S. However, climate models are generally not able to simulate these downpours because of their coarse resolution, which has made it difficult for researchers to assess future changes in storm frequency and intensity. For the new study, the research team used a new dataset that was created when NCAR scientists and study co-authors Roy Rasmussen, Changhai Liu, and Kyoko Ikeda ran the NCAR-based Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a resolution of 4 kilometers, fine enough to simulate individual storms. The simulations, which required a year to run, were performed on the Yellowstone system at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center. Prein and his co-authors used the new dataset to investigate changes in downpours over North America in detail. The researchers looked at how storms that occurred between 2000 and 2013 might change if they occurred instead in a climate that was 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer -- the temperature increase expected by the end of the century if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. Prein cautioned that this approach is a simplified way of comparing present and future climate. It doesn't reflect possible changes to storm tracks or weather systems associated with climate change. The advantage, however, is that scientists can more easily isolate the impact of additional heat and associated moisture on future storm formation. "The ability to simulate realistic downpours is a quantum leap in climate modeling. This enables us to investigate changes in hourly rainfall extremes that are related to flash flooding for the very first time," Prein said. "To do this took a tremendous amount of computational resources." The study found that the number of summertime storms producing extreme precipitation is expected to increase across the entire country, though the amount varies by region. The Midwest, for example, sees an increase of zero to about 100 percent across swaths of Nebraska, the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Iowa. But the Gulf Coast, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico all see increases ranging from 200 percent to more than 400 percent. The study also found that the intensity of extreme rainfall events in the summer could increase across nearly the entire country, with some regions, including the Northeast and parts of the Southwest, seeing particularly large increases, in some cases of more than 70 percent. A surprising result of the study is that extreme downpours will also increase in areas that are getting drier on average, especially in the Midwest. This is because moderate rainfall events that are the major source of moisture in this region during the summertime are expected to decrease significantly while extreme events increase in frequency and intensity. This shift from moderate to intense rainfall increases the potential for flash floods and mudslides, and can have negative impacts on agriculture. The study also investigated how the environmental conditions that produce the most severe downpours might change in the future. In today's climate, the storms with the highest hourly rainfall intensities form when the daily average temperature is somewhere between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 to 77 degrees F) and with high atmospheric moisture. When the temperature gets too hot, rainstorms become weaker or don't occur at all because the increase in atmospheric moisture cannot keep pace with the increase in temperature. This relative drying of the air robs the atmosphere of one of the essential ingredients needed to form a storm. In the new study, the NCAR scientists found that storms may continue to intensify up to temperatures of 30 degrees C because of a more humid atmosphere. The result would be much more intense storms. "Understanding how climate change may affect the environments that produce the most intense storms is essential because of the significant impacts that these kinds of storms have on society," Prein said. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | January 12, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

One of the world's most powerful supercomputers dedicated to modeling the Earth's climate and weather is due to be replaced in 2017 with an even more sophisticated machine, researchers say. Silicon Graphics International Corp. will build the replacement for the current computer located at the Wyoming Supercomputing Center in Cheyenne, operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. A machine with 2.5 times the computing power will replace the current computer, dubbed Wyoming, a release from NCAR headquarters in Boulder, Colo., announced. The new machine, to be named Cheyenne, will be capable of computing at 5.34 petaflops, carrying out 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second. The existing Wyoming machine, used for climate and weather research since 2012 by more than 2,200 scientists and 300 universities, is ranked among the 60 fastest supercomputers in the world. It won't be taken offline when Cheyenne debuts, researchers say, but will continue to work alongside the new machine. That's because bandwidth and time on supercomputers is usually shared among many researchers and projects. "The machine is usually working on dozens of problems at the same time in a kind of mix of jobs that are running on it," explains Rich Loft, the center's director of technology. "Some of those jobs might take a quarter of the machine. Others might take only one percent." Although only in operation since 2012, the Wyoming unit is being replaced because of the rapid rate of technology advances, he says. "Things get better, faster cheaper. That's the whole story of computers," Loft says. "Certainly you know, if you have a phone, it starts to feel clunky after a few years." The new Cheyenne computer is being funded by the National Science Foundation and by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. It will help in studying diverse topics, including climate change and severe weather, geomagnetic storms, air quality, seismic activity, wildfires and other significant earth science subjects. Using 90 percent of the electricity the Wyoming machine consumes, Cheyenne will be three times as efficient while taking up only a third as much physical space, the researchers say. The new machine is being named in honor of the support received from the people of Cheyenne, and to celebrate the upcoming 150th anniversary of the founding of the city in 1876 and its naming for the American Indian Cheyenne nation.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — A new supercomputer in the top coal-mining state has begun critical climate-change research with support from even some global warming doubters, but scientists worry President Donald Trump could cut funding for such programs. The $30 million, house-sized supercomputer named Cheyenne belongs to a federally funded research center. It got to work a few weeks ago crunching numbers for several ambitious projects, from modeling air currents at wind farms to figuring out how to better predict weather months to years in advance. It's the fastest computer in the Rocky Mountain West — three times faster than the 4-year-old supercomputer named Yellowstone it is replacing and 20th-fastest in the world. Capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second, Cheyenne is 240,000 times faster than a new, high-end laptop. Located in a windy business park near the city of Cheyenne, the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Wyoming Supercomputing Center that houses the water-cooled machine continues to enjoy support even from Wyoming's coal cheerleaders who doubt humankind is warming the Earth. "Before we start making policy decisions on this, the science has got to be good," said Travis Deti, executive director of the Wyoming Mining Association. The vast majority of peer-reviewed studies, science organizations and climate scientists have found the Earth is warming and that the warming is man-made and a problem, but Wyoming's relationship with climate science is complicated at best. The University of Wyoming in 2012 removed a campus artwork made of charred logs after the fossil fuel industry objected to the piece's climate-change-awareness message. The state also has vacillated on whether and how K-12 students should learn about climate change. Gov. Matt Mead, who is suing to block Obama administration efforts to limit carbon emissions from power plants and other sources, calls himself a climate-change skeptic. Still, he supports the supercomputer's role in driving Wyoming's small technology sector, spokesman David Bush said. Even so, scientists worry Trump, who has called climate change a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese to harm U.S. economic interests, could cut such projects. About 70 percent of the supercomputer's cost comes from the National Science Foundation, an independent federal agency with a $7.5 billion budget. Traditionally the foundation has had bipartisan support, but some Republicans have suggested redirecting the agency away from the earth sciences — and from climate change research in particular. In December some 800 U.S. scientists, including 23 affiliated with the University of Wyoming and three at the organization that runs the supercomputer, signed an open letter urging Trump to take climate change seriously. "To be ignorant doesn't really prevent it from happening," said Shane Murphy, a University of Wyoming assistant professor and climate researcher who signed. The White House didn't immediately respond to an Associated Press request for comment on Trump's plans for funding the science foundation. Like its predecessor Yellowstone, Cheyenne will help better predict weather and, over the long term, climate change. "We believe that doing better predictions of those things have apolitical benefits — saving lives and saving money, and improving outcomes for businesses and farmers," said Rich Loft, a National Center for Atmospheric Research supercomputing specialist. The center moved its supercomputing to Cheyenne from Boulder, Colorado, in 2012, enticed by a $40 million state incentive package. These days, Wyoming doesn't have money to lure a supercomputer or much of anything else. Downturns in coal, oil and natural gas extraction — in part because of competition from renewable energy — have pinched state revenue. Wyoming continues to supply close to 40 percent of the nation's coal, however, and in 2014 the state put $15 million toward a $20 million facility to study carbon capture at a power plant near Gillette. The Yellowstone and Cheyenne supercomputers each use about 1.5 megawatts of electricity, or as much as 750 average-sized homes use on average at any given time. Some of the electricity comes from a wind farm 7 miles up the road. The supercomputers will work side-by-side until Yellowstone is decommissioned later this year. The center's scientists are aware of the political winds surrounding their work but plan to maintain the course on projects planned since long before Trump's election. "I really don't think that anybody at NCAR is talking about changing our science mission," Loft said.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This Oct. 26, 2016 photo provided by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research shows the new supercomputer named Cheyenne at the National Center for Atmospheric Research at the supercomputing center in Cheyenne, Wyo. Wyoming officials including Gov. Matt Mead say they support the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center even as they describe themselves as climate skeptics. Scientists nationwide are nonetheless concerned that President Donald Trump, who has called climate change a hoax, might not take climate change research seriously. (Carlye Calvin/ University Corporation for Atmospheric Research via AP) CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A new supercomputer in the top coal-mining state has begun critical climate-change research with support from even some global warming doubters, but scientists worry President Donald Trump could cut funding for such programs. The $30 million, house-sized supercomputer named Cheyenne belongs to a federally funded research center. It got to work a few weeks ago crunching numbers for several ambitious projects, from modeling air currents at wind farms to figuring out how to better predict weather months to years in advance. It's the fastest computer in the Rocky Mountain West — three times faster than the 4-year-old supercomputer named Yellowstone it is replacing and 20th-fastest in the world. Capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second, Cheyenne is 240,000 times faster than a new, high-end laptop. Located in a windy business park near the city of Cheyenne, the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Wyoming Supercomputing Center that houses the water-cooled machine continues to enjoy support even from Wyoming's coal cheerleaders who doubt humankind is warming the Earth. "Before we start making policy decisions on this, the science has got to be good," said Travis Deti, executive director of the Wyoming Mining Association. The vast majority of peer-reviewed studies, science organizations and climate scientists have found the Earth is warming and that the warming is man-made and a problem, but Wyoming's relationship with climate science is complicated at best. The University of Wyoming in 2012 removed a campus artwork made of charred logs after the fossil fuel industry objected to the piece's climate-change-awareness message. The state also has vacillated on whether and how K-12 students should learn about climate change. Gov. Matt Mead, who is suing to block Obama administration efforts to limit carbon emissions from power plants and other sources, calls himself a climate-change skeptic. Still, he supports the supercomputer's role in driving Wyoming's small technology sector, spokesman David Bush said. Even so, scientists worry Trump, who has called climate change a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese to harm U.S. economic interests, could cut such projects. About 70 percent of the supercomputer's cost comes from the National Science Foundation, an independent federal agency with a $7.5 billion budget. Traditionally the foundation has had bipartisan support, but some Republicans have suggested redirecting the agency away from the earth sciences — and from climate change research in particular. In December some 800 U.S. scientists, including 23 affiliated with the University of Wyoming and three at the organization that runs the supercomputer, signed an open letter urging Trump to take climate change seriously. "To be ignorant doesn't really prevent it from happening," said Shane Murphy, a University of Wyoming assistant professor and climate researcher who signed. The White House didn't immediately respond to an Associated Press request for comment on Trump's plans for funding the science foundation. Like its predecessor Yellowstone, Cheyenne will help better predict weather and, over the long term, climate change. "We believe that doing better predictions of those things have apolitical benefits — saving lives and saving money, and improving outcomes for businesses and farmers," said Rich Loft, a National Center for Atmospheric Research supercomputing specialist. The center moved its supercomputing to Cheyenne from Boulder, Colorado, in 2012, enticed by a $40 million state incentive package. These days, Wyoming doesn't have money to lure a supercomputer or much of anything else. Downturns in coal, oil and natural gas extraction — in part because of competition from renewable energy — have pinched state revenue. Wyoming continues to supply close to 40 percent of the nation's coal, however, and in 2014 the state put $15 million toward a $20 million facility to study carbon capture at a power plant near Gillette. The Yellowstone and Cheyenne supercomputers each use about 1.5 megawatts of electricity, or as much as 750 average-sized homes use on average at any given time. Some of the electricity comes from a wind farm 7 miles up the road. The supercomputers will work side-by-side until Yellowstone is decommissioned later this year. The center's scientists are aware of the political winds surrounding their work but plan to maintain the course on projects planned since long before Trump's election. "I really don't think that anybody at NCAR is talking about changing our science mission," Loft said.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

OSLO, Norway--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Asetek® (OSE:ASETEK) today announced that The University of Regensburg has selected Asetek InRackCDU™ technology to cool one of the first Intel® Xeon Phi™ based HPC clusters in Europe. The Fujitsu® installation is a joint research project (SFB/TRR-55) with The University of Wuppertal and Jülich Supercomputing Center. This installation was first disclosed by Asetek on June 22nd, 2016. Fujitsu continues to demonstrate growing success in HPC and vision as thought lea

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