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Testi D.,SCS B3C | Quadrani P.,Supercomputing Center | Viceconti M.,Laboratorio Of Tecnologia Medica
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences | Year: 2010

Every research laboratory has a wealth of biomedical data locked up, which, if shared with other experts, could dramatically improve biomedical and healthcare research. With the PhysiomeSpace service, it is now possible with a few clicks to share with selected users biomedical data in an easy, controlled and safe way. The digital library service is managed using a client-server approach. The client application is used to import, fuse and enrich the data information according to the PhysiomeSpace resource ontology and upload/download the data to the library. The server services are hosted on the Biomed Town community portal, where through a web interface, the user can complete the metadata curation and share and/or publish the data resources. A search service capitalizes on the domain ontology and on the enrichment of metadata for each resource, providing a powerful discovery environment. once the users have found the data resources they are interested in, they can add them to their basket, following a metaphor popular in e-commerce web sites. When all the necessary resources have been selected, the user can download the basket contents into the client application. The digital library service is now in beta and open to the biomedical research community. © 2010 The Royal Society. Source


Lee K.Y.,Gyeongsang National University | Nam S.-H.,Supercomputing Center
Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics | Year: 2015

We examine the direct limits on masses of extra neutral gauge bosons in the SU (4)L × U (1)X model with a little Higgs mechanism confronted with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data, especially by embedding an anomaly-free set of fermions. There exist two extra neutral gauge bosons, called Z′ and Z″, in this model. The lower exclusion limit of the mass of the lighter extra neutral gauge boson is about 3 TeV, while that of the heavier one is 5 TeV. For comparison, we examine the mass limit of the Z3′ boson in the SU (3)L × U (1)X model as well and discuss the implication of our result in the SU (4)L × U (1)X model with a standard Higgs mechanism. We also discuss the discovery potential of Z′ and Z″ at the future LHC with a center-ofmomentum energy of 14 TeV. Our results can be applicable to models with a regular Higgs mechanism if the same type of fermion family is assigned. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd. Source


News Article
Site: http://news.yahoo.com/green/

FILE - In this Oct. 15, 2012, file photo, Matthew Hirschland, communications director for the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, stands at the end of two rows of processors that make up a small part of the new National Center for Atmospheric Research NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) Yellowstone supercomputer on the outskirts of Cheyenne, Wyo. One of the most powerful computers in the world dedicated to climate change, weather and other earth science research will be replaced in 2017 by an even faster machine, officials announced Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. The Yellowstone supercomputer currently ranks among the 60 fastest. The new supercomputer, to be named Cheyenne, will be at least 2 1/2 times more powerful, the NCAR said. Capable of 5.3 quadrillion calculations, or Petaflops, per second, Cheyenne will be some 100,000 times faster than a typical home computer. (AP Photo/Mead Gruver, File) More CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — One of the most powerful computers in the world dedicated to climate change, weather and other earth science research will be replaced in 2017 by an even faster machine, officials announced Monday. The Yellowstone supercomputer in Wyoming currently ranks among the 60 fastest in the world. The new supercomputer, to be named Cheyenne, will be at least 2 1/2 times more powerful, the National Center for Atmospheric Research said. Capable of 5.3 quadrillion calculations, or petaflops, per second, Cheyenne will be some 100,000 times faster than a typical home computer. The speed provides unprecedented detail in climate-change predictions, including regional modeling of effects, the center said. A more powerful computer will allow researchers to see results in higher resolution, like a higher density of pixels sharpens images on a television or a stronger telescope brings a greater number of far-off galaxies into focus, explained Rich Loft, the center's director of technology. Scientists since 2012 have been using the Yellowstone supercomputer near Cheyenne for a range of research that also includes modeling air pollution and ocean currents. The atmospheric research center plans to install Cheyenne later this year and put it to work early next year. Questions it might help answer include: — Is the California drought a fluke or due to global climate change? — Can scientists predict the intensity of solar flares — streams of radiation released by the sun that can endanger satellites and astronauts — during an upcoming solar cycle? — How might climate change increase the likelihood of drought and change the extent of arctic sea ice from decade to decade? The Yellowstone computer, located in a business park a few miles west of Cheyenne, put Wyoming's capital on the map as a potential technology hub. Facilities including a huge Microsoft data center have set up nearby since the center opened. The old machine won't shut down when the new one boots up. The computers will be side-by-side for much of next year but won't operate in direct coordination. Time and bandwidth on supercomputers typically gets divvied up among researchers and rarely goes to a single project at a time. "The machine is usually working on dozens of problems at the same time in a kind of mix of jobs that are running on it. Some of those jobs might take a quarter of the machine. Others might take only 1 percent," Loft said. More than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used Yellowstone since 2012. Officials moved to replace the first Yellowstone computer so quickly because of the rapid pace of technology. "Things get better, faster cheaper. That's the whole story of computers," Loft said. "Certainly you know, if you have a phone, it starts to feel clunky after a few years." The Cheyenne supercomputer will be about three times as efficient as Yellowstone, using 90 percent as much electricity but taking up to a third as much space. The machine will be built by Milpitas, California-based Silicon Graphics International Corp. The University Corp. for Atmospheric Research, a consortium of more than 100 North American universities and colleges, oversees the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Both organizations are based in Boulder, Colorado.


News Article
Site: http://www.scientificcomputing.com/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

BOULDER — The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) announced that it has selected its next supercomputer for advancing atmospheric and Earth science, following a competitive open procurement process. The new machine will help scientists lay the groundwork for improved predictions of a range of phenomena, from hour-by-hour risks associated with thunderstorm outbreaks to the timing of the 11-year solar cycle and its potential impacts on GPS and other sensitive technologies. The new system, named Cheyenne, will be installed this year at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) and become operational at the beginning of 2017. Cheyenne will be built by Silicon Graphics International (SGI) in conjunction with centralized file system and data storage components provided by DataDirect Networks (DDN). The SGI high-performance computer will be a 5.34-petaflop system, meaning it can carry out 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second. It will be capable of more than 2.5 times the amount of scientific computing performed by Yellowstone, the current NCAR supercomputer. Funded by the National Science Foundation and the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming, Cheyenne will be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires and other important geoscience topics. Since the supercomputing facility in Wyoming opened its doors in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. “We’re excited to bring more supercomputing power to the scientific community,” said Anke Kamrath, director of operations and services at NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory. “Whether it’s the threat of solar storms or a heightened risk in certain severe weather events, this new system will help lead to improved predictions and strengthen society’s resilience to potential disasters.” “Researchers at the University of Wyoming will make great use of the new system as they continue their work into better understanding such areas as the surface and subsurface flows of water and other liquids, cloud processes, and the design of wind energy plants,” said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. “UW’s relationship with NCAR through the NWSC has greatly strengthened our scientific computing and data-centric research. It’s helping us introduce the next generation of scientists and engineers to these endeavors.” The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support that it has received from the people of that city. It also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne nation. The new data storage system for Cheyenne will be integrated with NCAR’s existing GLADE file system. The DDN storage will provide an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives. This, combined with the current 16 petabytes of GLADE, will total 36 petabytes of high-speed storage. The new DDN system also will transfer data at the rate of 200 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the current file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. The system will include powerful Intel Xeon processors, whose performance will be augmented through optimization work that has been done by NCAR and the University of Colorado Boulder. NCAR and the university performed this work through their participation in the Intel Parallel Computing Centers program. Even with its increased power, Cheyenne will be three times more energy efficient (in floating point operations per second, or flops, per watt) than Yellowstone, its predecessor, which is itself highly efficient. “The new system will have a peak computation rate of over 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of power consumed," said NCAR’s Irfan Elahi, project manager of Cheyenne and section manager for high-end supercomputing services. High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex processes and how they might unfold in the future. These predictions give resource managers and policy experts valuable information for planning ahead and mitigating risk. Some of the areas in which Cheyenne is expected to accelerate research include the following: “Supercomputing is vital to NCAR’s scientific research and applications, giving us a virtual laboratory in which we run experiments that would otherwise be impractical or impossible to do,” said NCAR Director James Hurrell. “Cheyenne will be a key component of the research infrastructure of the United States through its provision of supercomputing specifically tailored for the atmospheric, geospace and related sciences. The capabilities of this new system will be central to the continued improvement of our ability to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, air quality and space weather, as well as their impacts on people, ecosystems and society.” Key features of the new Cheyenne supercomputer system: The new Cheyenne supercomputer and the existing file system are complemented by a new centralized parallel file system and data storage components. Key features of the new data storage system: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


News Article
Site: http://phys.org/technology-news/

The new system, named Cheyenne, will be installed this year at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) and become operational at the beginning of 2017. Cheyenne will be built by Silicon Graphics International Corp. (SGI) in conjunction with centralized file system and data storage components provided by DataDirect Networks (DDN). The SGI high-performance computer will be a 5.34-petaflop system, meaning it can carry out 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second. It will be capable of more than 2.5 times the amount of scientific computing performed by Yellowstone, the current NCAR supercomputer. Funded by the National Science Foundation and the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming, Cheyenne will be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires, and other important geoscience topics. Since the supercomputing facility in Wyoming opened its doors in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "We're excited to bring more supercomputing power to the scientific community," said Anke Kamrath, director of operations and services at NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory. "Whether it's the threat of solar storms or a heightened risk in certain severe weather events, this new system will help lead to improved predictions and strengthen society's resilience to potential disasters." "Researchers at the University of Wyoming will make great use of the new system as they continue their work into better understanding such areas as the surface and subsurface flows of water and other liquids, cloud processes, and the design of wind energy plants," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "UW's relationship with NCAR through the NWSC has greatly strengthened our scientific computing and data-centric research. It's helping us introduce the next generation of scientists and engineers to these endeavors." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support that it has received from the people of that city. It also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne nation. The new data storage system for Cheyenne will be integrated with NCAR's existing GLADE file system. The DDN storage will provide an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives. This, combined with the current 16 petabytes of GLADE, will total 36 petabytes of high-speed storage. The new DDN system also will transfer data at the rate of 200 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the current file system's rate of 90 gigabytes per second. The system will include powerful Intel Xeon processors, whose performance will be augmented through optimization work that has been done by NCAR and the University of Colorado Boulder. NCAR and the university performed this work through their participation in the Intel Parallel Computing Centers program. Even with its increased power, Cheyenne will be three times more energy efficient (in floating point operations per second, or flops, per watt) than Yellowstone, its predecessor, which is itself highly efficient. "The new system will have a peak computation rate of over 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of power consumed," said NCAR's Irfan Elahi, project manager of Cheyenne and section manager for high-end supercomputing services. High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex processes and how they might unfold in the future. These predictions give resource managers and policy experts valuable information for planning ahead and mitigating risk. Some of the areas in which Cheyenne is expected to accelerate research include the following: "Supercomputing is vital to NCAR's scientific research and applications, giving us a virtual laboratory in which we run experiments that would otherwise be impractical or impossible to do," said NCAR Director James Hurrell. "Cheyenne will be a key component of the research infrastructure of the United States through its provision of supercomputing specifically tailored for the atmospheric, geospace, and related sciences. The capabilities of this new system will be central to the continued improvement of our ability to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, air quality, and space weather, as well as their impacts on people, ecosystems, and society." Key features of the new Cheyenne supercomputer system: The new Cheyenne supercomputer and the existing file system are complemented by a new centralized parallel file system and data storage components. Key features of the new data storage system: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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