Syracuse, NY, United States
Syracuse, NY, United States

The State University of New York Upstate Medical University is a SUNY health science university located primarily in the University Hill district of Syracuse, New York. SUNY Upstate is an upper-division transfer and graduate college with degree programs within the College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Health Professions, and the College of Graduate Studies. Its Syracuse campus includes Upstate University Hospital.In addition to affiliations with Binghamton Hospital and 22 other hospitals throughout central New York, where much of the core clinical teaching takes place, Upstate has numerous partnerships, including a joint Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering with Syracuse University; science enrichment programs for local youth in tandem with the SC Hope Clinic; and SUNY-ESF.It directly generates 8,195 jobs, making it Central New York's largest employer. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tampa, Fla. (May 1, 2017) - At the 24rd Annual Conference of the American Society of Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR), held April 27-29 in Clearwater Beach, Florida, ASNTR awarded The 2017 Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair to Li-Ru Zhao, PhD, MD, a tenured Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University and research scientist at the Syracuse (NY) Veterans Administration Medical Center. The award, presented to her on Saturday April 29, recognized her significant research contributions in acute and chronic stroke, vascular dementia, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Zhao received her MD from Hebei Medical College in Shijizhaung China in 1982 and her PhD in neuroscience from the Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden in 2004. She carried out postdoctoral work at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis. She subsequently served as a researcher and assistant at Northwestern University, and associate professor at Louisiana State University prior to coming to SUNY Upstate Medical University and the Syracuse VA Medical Center. Dr. Zhao's extensive investigation into potential treatments for the debilitating effects of stroke includes the first demonstration of the neuroprotective properties of stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and SCF + G-CSF combinations in treating the effects of acute and chronic stroke. She discovered that these growth factors - naturally occurring substances capable of stimulating cellular growth, proliferation and healing - could be used alone or in combination to reduced brain damage from stroke and improve motor function. Her many studies into SCF and G-CSF used a variety of approaches, including molecular and cell biology as well as brain and cell imaging. Her contributions to Alzheimer's disease (AD) research have investigated how amyloid plaques in the brain (one of the causes thought to be behind the development of AD) might be cleared by injections of bone marrow-derived monocytes/macrophages (BMDMs) and SCF+G-CSF, all of which have been found to be low in the blood and bone marrow of AD patients. In her most recent stroke studies she is investigating Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), the most common yet rare form of hereditary stroke disorder. Using animal models, she found that neural stem cells were radically reduced in patients with CADSIL, causing cognitive impairment. Currently, there is no drug that can improve the functional or delay the progressive brain damage caused by CADASIL. Her laboratory is currently studying how the bone marrow stem cell factors (SCF and G-CSF) repair the brain in both AD and CADASIL and is working at determining how the bone marrow stem cell factors regulate neuronal process formation, synaptic generation, and stem cell growth and differentiation. "Dr. Zhao's studies have significantly advanced our understanding about the contribution of SCF and G-CSF in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, scientist emeritus at the National Institutes of Health and an adjunct professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "She has also carried out exceptional service activities as a peer reviewer for grants for NIH, AHA, and Alzheimer's Association, as well as for a large number of scientific journals." According to Dr. Hoffer, she has successfully balanced her career and personal life, including raising an "exceptionally gifted" son who is currently a resident in neurosurgery at University Hospitals of Cleveland. The award Dr. Zhao received is named for Bernard Sanberg, father of Dr. Paul Sanberg (University of South Florida), a co-founder of the ASNTR. After Bernard Sanberg died of a stroke in 1999, the award bearing his name was established and is presented by the ASNTR annually to an individual who has made outstanding research contributions in the field of neural therapy and repair. The award, first presented in 2000, is presented every year at ASNTR's Annual Meeting. Recent past winners of the Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair include: Mariana E. Emborg, PhD, MD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John D. Elsworth, PhD, Yale School of Medicine, Douglas Kondziolka, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center; Mike Modo, PhD, University of Pittsburgh; Timothy Collier, PhD, Michigan State University; Donald Eugene Redmond, MD, Yale University; Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD, China Medical University; Howard J. Federoff, MD, PhD, Georgetown University; Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health ASNTR's 25th Annual Conference will be held April 25-29, 2018 in Clearwater Beach, Florida. For more information, email Donna Morrison dmorriso@health.usf.edu or visit the ASNTR website http://www. ASNTR is a society for basic and clinical neuroscientists using a variety of technologies to better understand how the nervous system functions and establish new procedures for its repair in response to trauma or neurodegenerative disease. Member scientists employ stem/neural cell transplantation, gene therapy, trophic factor and neuroprotective compound administration and other approaches.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The Global Translational Regenerative Medicine market is expected to grow significantly over the forecast period. The Global Translational Regenerative Medicine market was valued at $5.8bn in 2016. Visiongain forecasts this market to increase to $14.5bn in 2021. The market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 19.9% in the first half of the forecast period and 17.7% from 2016 to 2027. How this report will benefit you Read on to discover how you can exploit the future business opportunities emerging in this sector. In this brand new report you find 316-page report you will receive 107 tables and 66 figures - all unavailable elsewhere. The 316-page report provides clear detailed insight into the Global Translational Regenerative Medicine market. Discover the key drivers and challenges affecting the market. By ordering and reading our brand new report today you stay better informed and ready to act. • Forecasts from 2017-2027 of the leading products in the Global Translational Regenerative Medicine market: - Osteocel Plus - Trinity ELITE - TEMCELL /Prochymal - Apligraf - Dermagraft - Epifix - ReCell - Neovasculgen - Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) - IMLYGIC (talimogene laherparepvec) • SWOT and Porter's Five Force analysis of the translational regenerative medicine market Visiongain's study is intended for anyone requiring commercial analyses for the Translational Regenerative Medicine Market and leading companies. You find data, trends and predictions. To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 List of Organisations Mentioned in the Report Arthritis Research UK Associazione Infermieristica per lo Studio delle Lesioni Cutanee (AISLeC) [China] Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) British Heart Foundation [UK] California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Cambridge Stem Cell Biology Institute [UK] Case Western Reserve University Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) [US] CHA General Hospital [Korea] Cryocenter Saint Petersburg Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI) European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) European Medicines Agency Food and Drugs Agency (FDA) [US] Haute Autorité de santé [France] Heriot-Watt University Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital [Japan] International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Karolinska Institute [Sweden] Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Mayo Clinic [US] Medical Research Council [UK] MiMedx Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, MFDS) [Korea] Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) [Japan] Ministry of Science and Technology [China] Moorfields Eye Hospital National Tissue Engineering Center (NTEC) [China] New York Blood Center Riken Center for Developmental Biology RUSH University Medical Center [US] Russian Ministry of Healthcare and Social Development Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine St. Jude's Children Research Hospital State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) [China] SUNY Upstate Medical University The Genetico Center [Russia] The StemGen Organisation Therapeutics Goods Administration (TGA) [Australia] UH San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona [Spain] University College London University of Edinburgh MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine [UK] University of Massachusetts (UMass) Memorial Hospital University of Modena Centre for Regenerative Medicine [Italy] University of Wisconsin US National Institute of Health Wake Forest Institute Wellcome Trust World Health Organization To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com


Cingolani G.,Thomas Jefferson University | Duncan T.M.,SUNY Upstate Medical University
Nature Structural and Molecular Biology | Year: 2011

ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F 1) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F 1 structures. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

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