Old Westbury, NY, United States

SUNY College at Old Westbury

www.oldwestbury.edu
Old Westbury, NY, United States

The State University of New York College at Old Westbury is a university college that is part of the State University of New York system. The college is in Old Westbury, New York, with portions in the neighboring town of Jericho, New York. With nearly 4,000 students, SUNY College at Old Westbury serves as the only public liberal arts college on Long Island. Wikipedia.

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Popular crowdfunding sites host many projects that are initiated by first-time entrepreneurs for a variety of creative products. In these projects, funders face a unique uncertainty: seller competence uncertainty. Unlike traditional e-commerce, where products are already finished and ready for shipment, in crowdfunded projects the product still needs to be produced. The seller competence uncertainty captures the uncertainty related to the project initiator's ability to finish the product. When people on crowdfunding sites are presented with an information overload and face ambiguity regarding a project, they tend to follow the decisions of others to differentiate the projects they find legitimate from those that they find illegitimate. Current literature postulates that funders make decisions by following the decisions of the crowd, and this herd behavior leads to less than optimal decisions. Having a mechanism that aids decision-making would be beneficial for the long-term success of crowdfunding sites. The researchers write that crowdfunding sites can integrate social information from experts and friends to assist decision-making. "The crowdfunding website can extract information from Facebook, and then your Facebook friends will be notified that you have funded a project," said Surinder Singh Kahai, associate professor in Binghamton University's School of Management, suggesting possible ways that this information could be leveraged. "Information can also be extracted from sources such as LinkedIn. That way, if you are an engineer funding a computer- or hardware-related project, the crowdfunding platform can give you expertise level." Binghamton University researchers Kahai and Ali Alper Yayla, along with Yu Lei from SUNY College at Old Westbury, recruited subjects through Amazon Mechanical Turk, a crowdsourcing internet marketplace, to examine the influence of different reference groups (experts, friends and family, the crowd) at different product complexities. The researchers conducted a controlled lab experiment, designing several webpages to mimic a crowdfunding environment and incorporate the influence of different reference groups. By proposing both implicit and explicit social information, they were able to identify which type of information each reference group provided during the decision-making process. The researchers found that under low product complexity, funders needed more implicit information, and they followed friends over experts and crowd to make pledging decisions. On the other hand, under high product complexity, people needed more explicit information, and they rationalized their pledging behaviors by following experts over crowd and friends. "We have to look at external sources, specifically reference groups, which include our friends and family, or experts who have expertise in a certain area and the general population," said Yayla. "When I have to make a decision about which mechanic to bring my car to, I should probably listen to the experts, but instead I listen to my friends or I use a website such as Yelp to read reviews." The paper, "Guiding the Herd: The Effect of Reference Groups in Crowdfunding Decision Making," was presented at the 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Explore further: Study finds three key factors to crowdfunding success


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BINGHAMTON, NY - Social information gathered from friends and experts, depending on the complexity of the product, can decrease uncertainty in crowdfunding campaigns, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Popular crowdfunding sites host many projects that are initiated by first-time entrepreneurs for a variety of creative products. In these projects, funders face a unique uncertainty: seller competence uncertainty. Unlike traditional e-commerce, where products are already finished and ready for shipment, in crowdfunded projects the product still needs to be produced. The seller competence uncertainty captures the uncertainty related to the project initiator's ability to finish the product. When people on crowdfunding sites are presented with an information overload and face ambiguity regarding a project, they tend to follow the decisions of others to differentiate the projects they find legitimate from those that they find illegitimate. Current literature postulates that funders make decisions by following the decisions of the crowd, and this herd behavior leads to less than optimal decisions. Having a mechanism that aids decision-making would be beneficial for the long-term success of crowdfunding sites. The researchers write that crowdfunding sites can integrate social information from experts and friends to assist decision-making. "The crowdfunding website can extract information from Facebook, and then your Facebook friends will be notified that you have funded a project," said Surinder Singh Kahai, associate professor in Binghamton University's School of Management, suggesting possible ways that this information could be leveraged. "Information can also be extracted from sources such as LinkedIn. That way, if you are an engineer funding a computer- or hardware-related project, the crowdfunding platform can give you expertise level." Binghamton University researchers Kahai and Ali Alper Yayla, along with Yu Lei from SUNY College at Old Westbury, recruited subjects through Amazon Mechanical Turk, a crowdsourcing internet marketplace, to examine the influence of different reference groups (experts, friends and family, the crowd) at different product complexities. The researchers conducted a controlled lab experiment, designing several webpages to mimic a crowdfunding environment and incorporate the influence of different reference groups. By proposing both implicit and explicit social information, they were able to identify which type of information each reference group provided during the decision-making process. The researchers found that under low product complexity, funders needed more implicit information, and they followed friends over experts and crowd to make pledging decisions. On the other hand, under high product complexity, people needed more explicit information, and they rationalized their pledging behaviors by following experts over crowd and friends. "We have to look at external sources, specifically reference groups, which include our friends and family, or experts who have expertise in a certain area and the general population," said Yayla. "When I have to make a decision about which mechanic to bring my car to, I should probably listen to the experts, but instead I listen to my friends or I use a website such as Yelp to read reviews." The paper, "Guiding the Herd: The Effect of Reference Groups in Crowdfunding Decision Making," was presented at the 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.


Bishop F.M.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
Health Psychology Open | Year: 2016

Predicting relapses to binge drinking in non-dependent drinkers may now be possible with smartphones. Smartphones have been shown to help individuals reduce their drinking and may help binge drinkers accelerate that process. Predicting the weather has improved greatly over the past 50 years, but predicting a binge drinking episode may be less difficult. It is hypothesized that the number of factors with high predictive value for any particular individual may not be large. Collecting data over time, a smartphone should be able to learn which combination of factors has a high probability of leading to an episode of binge drinking. © The Author(s) 2016.


Shigihara A.M.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
Advances in Life Course Research | Year: 2015

The traditional life course perspective is less widely applicable today than it was several decades ago. Drawing on data from 52 in-depth, semi-structured interviews, this article investigates a case of restaurant workers and how and why their experiences complicate the assumptions of the traditional life course stage model. Analysis of the data reveals that restaurant employees have multidimensional and nonlinear life course trajectories, and their accounts of aging both challenge and complement the characteristics of several developmental stages. This study illustrates how restaurant workers approach dilemmas accompanying non-normative development by “doing” strategic adulthood, whereby they sustain “legitimate” presentations of “adulthood” but continue to participate in “youthful” behaviors. The data show that restaurants can and do provide a pathway for unconventional ways of making a living and developing. These conclusions contribute to broadening the understanding of stage transitions, subjective age identity, and “nonstandard work” in the life course, and to theoretical explanations for people's ambivalence about adulthood. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd


Gao R.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2015

In a typical chemistry instrumentation laboratory, students learn analytical techniques through a well-developed procedure. Such an approach, however, does not engage students in a creative endeavor. To foster the intrinsic motivation of students' desire to learn, improve their confidence in self-directed learning activities and enhance their problem-solving skills, students' self-designed, research-based analytical chemistry projects have been developed within the course of Advanced Chemical Methods for junior and senior undergraduates at SUNY College at Old Westbury. In addition to a series of manual-based laboratories held on a regular basis, students also do a literature search to formulate their own ideas that are tested using appropriate analytical instruments. By participating in self-designed projects, students independently go through the key components of analytical chemistry with greater engagement: from literature survey, problem identification, experimental design, sample preparation, measurements, results and discussion to conclusion, in a self-inquiry-based learning environment. The instructor's observation, assessment of written reports and students' self-evaluations indicate successful implementation of the projects and students' progress toward the goals mentioned above. This project provides students a research-based chemistry laboratory for self-inquiry-driven learning and independent thinking. © 2015 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc.


Zhu J.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
Procedia Computer Science | Year: 2013

Point-of-Sales (POS) data can be helpful to improve demand forecast even your business is at the upstream of the supply chain. When your business is several steps away from the end-user, regression analysis using POS data as the predictors provides is an effective way to improve your demand forecast. In this article, we present a real case where the business is two steps away from the end-user and demonstrate how the business uses POS data to improve a business forecast. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Heller J.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2015

The social context of the early HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States provided fertile ground for rumors about transmission. Today, however, rumors about HIV/AIDS persist only within the African American public. Focus group and public discourse data reveal the content and distribution of HIV/AIDS origin and conspiracy rumors. Rumor and contemporary legend theory allows reinterpretation of rumors as a measure of trust between the African American public and health professionals, not as evidence of ignorance or of historical racial oppression. To improve public health results in the African American community, HIV/AIDS efforts must acknowledge the sources and meanings of rumors, include rumors as a measure of trust, and address the underlying distrust that the rumors signify.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 296.19K | Year: 2016

The Department of Chemistry at State University of New York at Old Westbury (SUNY-OW) will explore how undergraduate students can be motivated to work independently and gain skills with inquiry-based laboratory experiences. This project will bridge the gap between desired student learning outcomes and current instructional practices. Compared to traditional cookbook-style laboratory experiences, which leave many students unacquainted with scientific methodology and argumentation, inquiry-based experiences provide a richer and more meaningful learning experience. The project will also explore the impact of team teaching on student engagement and learning progress. SUNY-OW accepts a larger number of transfer students and will actively disseminate their findings to their feeder community colleges and other institutions.

This project will study creative approaches for improving STEM learning and learning environments, with a focus on a research-rich and a skills-rich chemistry laboratory curriculum. The goal is to improve undergraduates understanding of scientific methodology and argumentation via inquiry-based laboratory teaching and argumentative writing. By integrating students self-designed projects into teaching laboratories, the project will provide opportunities for students to work independently and to think critically as scientists. Through guided argumentative writing, students deep thinking will be persistently focused on projects while their knowledge-based understanding develops. The impact of instructor-guided and student-generated inquiries on learning will be examined. This project will generate new evidence regarding effective instruction in the chemistry laboratory, thus leading to a better instructional design in undergraduate chemistry.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 30.00K | Year: 2013

The project is developing a multidisciplinary, multi-campus program minor in energy science, technology, and policy, through a unique regional partnership consisting of public and private four-year and two-year colleges. Project objectives include: 1) successful design and implementation of a multi-institution energy education program that is leveraging institutional academic strengths and access to student populations at the different campuses; 2) design of a program valuable for students in both technical (i.e. architecture, engineering, and science) and non-technical (i.e. business, accounting, and general studies) majors, at both two-year and four-year colleges; 3) enhancement of STEM learning through multidisciplinary curricula, experiential learning through
internships and research, and incorporation of stakeholder input in course and program development; and 4) recruitment and retention of students from underrepresented and underserved populations.

The project is enhancing collaboration with STEM education community and is helping to promote the two- to four-year college transition and beyond. By coordinating the program across multiple campuses, the project is facilitating articulation among institutions. Several of the schools involved have large populations of students traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields, and all have significant programs aimed at recruitment and retention. The project is working to increase participation from those groups significantly.


Stefano G.B.,SUNY College at Old Westbury | Kream R.M.,SUNY College at Old Westbury
CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics | Year: 2010

Morphine biosynthesis in relatively simple and complex integrated animal systems has been demonstrated. Key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway have also been identified, that is, CYP2D6 and COMT. Endogenous morphine appears to exert highly selective actions via novel mu opiate receptor subtypes, that is, mu3,-4, which are coupled to constitutive nitric oxide release, exerting general yet specific down regulatory actions in various animal tissues. The pivotal role of dopamine as a chemical intermediate in the morphine biosynthetic pathway in plants establishes a functional basis for its expansion into an essential role as the progenitor catecholamine signaling molecule underlying neural and neuroendocrine transmission across diverse animal phyla. In invertebrate neural systems, dopamine serves as the preeminent catecholamine signaling molecule, with the emergence and limited utilization of norepinephrine in newly defined adaptational chemical circuits required by a rapidly expanding set of physiological demands, that is, motor and motivational networks. In vertebrates epinephrine, emerges as the major end of the catecholamine synthetic pathway consistent with a newly incorporated regulatory modification. Given the striking similarities between the enzymatic steps in the morphine biosynthetic pathway and those driving the evolutionary adaptation of catecholamine chemical species to accommodate an expansion of interactive but distinct signaling systems, it is our overall contention that the evolutionary emergence of catecholamine systems required conservation and selective "retrofit" of specific enzyme activities, that is, COMT, drawn from cellular morphine expression. Our compelling hypothesis promises to initiate the reexamination of clinical studies, adding new information and treatment modalities in biomedicine. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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