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Lisa M. Patrick, MD, Addiction Psychiatrist with her own practice located in both Armonk and Manhattan, New York, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Armonk, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Lisa M. Patrick is an experienced and respected psychiatrist who has been in practice for over 13 years. Her career in medicine began in 2003, when she graduated from SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, having earlier gained a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the State University of New York at Albany. Dr. Patrick later completed an internship, residency and fellowship at the New York University Langone Medical Center. Dr. Patrick is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and has quickly become renowned as one of New York’s leading addiction psychiatrists. She treats a wide range of conditions, including alcohol and opiate addictions, provides psychotherapy and family counseling, and is an expert in psychopharmacology. Dr. Patrick is noted not only for her excellent results as an addiction psychiatrist, but also for her caring and compassionate approach to her work. She is fluent in both English and Japanese, helping her to treat a wide array of patients. She is always happy to discuss conditions and possible treatments with her patients, which makes her popular with her patients and peers alike. Her dedication and commitment makes Dr. Lisa M. Patrick a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at Cipriani Wall Street, Boys Hope Girls Hope New York (BHGHNY), New York City’s only college access urban boarding program, will honor New York Giants Quarterback Eli Manning with the Ann & Wellington Mara Award for his outstanding charity work in the community and with helping children in need, and Randy Falco, President and CEO of Univision Communications, Inc., with the Vision of Hope Award, presented annually to an individual whose lifelong commitment to philanthropy, community service and to our nation's youth has inspired, empowered, nurtured and encouraged others to succeed. Each year in May, BHGHNY holds the Vision of Hope Awards Dinner drawing nearly 1,000 influential guests and supporters. Held at Cipriani Wall Street, the gala is the organization's main source of funding, often raising 65% of its annual operating budget. Co-founded in 1979 by New York Giants Owner, Wellington Mara, BHGHNY, is a regional and autonomous affiliate of Boys Hope Girls Hope (BHGH), an international charitable organization headquartered in St. Louis, MO with operations in fifteen U.S. cities and in Guatemala, Mexico and Peru. In Brooklyn, NY, BHGHNY operates a rigorous college preparatory boarding program in partnership with Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School and Cristo Rey Brooklyn. Using residences adjacent to the schools, BHGHNY works year-round to serve at-risk-low-income-first-generation-college-bound-students who have the ability to excel in a nurturing and demanding academic community. As the region's only urban boarding program, BHGHNY is at the vanguard of youth development and its overall efficacy and approach continue to set new standards in student services and support. “Despite facing enormous challenges, the young men and women under the organization's care exhibit grit and an uncommon motivation to pursue higher education and become productive and responsible citizens,” said Malick Fall, the organization’s Executive Director. “Over the course of the past four years, our students’ efforts and the generous funding of donors have led to overall program retention and graduation rates of 92% or higher and nearly 100% of graduates have gone on to higher education.” Some recent college acceptances include Princeton, Dartmouth, UPenn, Cornell, Barnard, Duke Georgetown, Holy Cross, Boston College, Brown, NYU, Williams, Swarthmore, Tufts, Hamilton, Colgate, the University of Virginia, Smith, Syracuse and the full range of SUNY and CUNY schools. Mark your calendars. Gather your friends. Celebrate the success that helped create and keep the doors open for deserving and motivated teenagers seeking to pursue higher education and becoming responsible and productive citizens. To learn more about the event, attend or sponsor the gala, call 718-638-1100 or visit bit.ly (https://www.501auctions.com/bhghny/). Follow Boys Hope Girls Hope New York on Facebook and Instagram. BHGHNY's mission is to help academically capable and motivated children from at-risk situations meet their full potential and become men and women for others by providing them with the safe and stable living environment, academic support, and guidance they need to finish high school, graduate from college, and become responsible and productive citizens. In 1977, Father Paul Sheridan, SJ, an educator in St. Louis, MO, created a new program - Boys Hope Girls Hope - to address the needs of children whose potential was threatened by shattered neighborhoods, distressed families, endemic poverty, and other factors beyond their control. Today, Boys Hope Girls Hope (BHGH) is a non-sectarian, international charitable organization with operations in fifteen U.S. cities and 3 countries in Latin America.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Patrick J. Lynch, Radiologist to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Patrick J. Lynch is a highly trained and qualified physician with a vast expertise in all facets of his work, especially women’s imaging, mammography, ultrasonography, and breast MRI. He has been in practice for nearly three decades and is currently serving patients within CNY Diagnostic Imaging Associates in Syracuse, New York. Dr. Lynch’s career in medicine began in 1985, when he graduated from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Upon receiving his Medical Degree, he completed an internship in Internal Medicine at the Bay State Medical Institute in 1986, before undertaking his residency in Diagnostic Radiology at the SUNY Upstate Medical Center. Dr. Lynch is certified by the American Board of Radiology, and maintains a professional membership with the American College of Radiology and the Radiological Society of North America, allowing him to stay current with the latest advances in his field. He attributes his successful career to his continuous hard work and motivation for doing what he loves. When he is not assisting his patients, Dr. Lynch enjoys swimming, traveling, and spending time with his family. Learn more about Dr. Patrick J. Lynch here: http://www.cnydiagnosticimaging.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BUFFALO, NY, May 11, 2017-- Michelle Linder has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Michelle Linder is a graduate research assistant at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she is pursuing a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry. Her current research focuses on the synthesis and use of various heavy chalcogen-containing rhodamine dyes as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, extracorporeal photopheresis, and dye-sensitized solar cells. Ms. Linder has been a graduate research assistant since 2012. From 2012 to 2015, she was also a teaching assistant at the school. Ms. Linder graduated summa cum laude from SUNY Oneonta in 2012 with a Bachelor of Science in chemistry. In 2010, she earned an advanced tutor certification through the College Reading and Learning Association.Ms. Linder has utilized her knowledge and research to co-author a number of publications in the past few years. These include "Luminescence spectroscopy of chalcogen substituted rhodamine cations in vacuo," published in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences in 2017, "Targeting T Cell Bioenergetics by Modulating P-Glycoprotein Selectivity Depletes Alloreactive T Cells to Prevent Graft-Versus-Host Disease," published in the Journal of Immunology in 2016, "Extended Rhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016, and "Selective Photodepletion of Malignant T Cells in Extracorporeal Photopheresis with Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers," also published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016. She is also a co-author of "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers with the Texas-red Core for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2015, "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Cancer Cells," published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in 2014, and "Synthesis and Properties of Heavy Chalcogen Analogues of the Texas Reds and Related Rhodamines," published in Organometallics in 2014.A member of the Omicron Delta Kappa National Honor Society, Ms. Linder also remains active with the American Chemical Society. She has received numerous awards and honors over the years in light of her effort and achievements in the field of chemistry. Most recently, Ms. Linder received the Graduate Student Excellence in Teaching Award from the University of Buffalo's Graduate School. She is also a recipient of the Speyer Fellowship, the Jere Solo Fellowship, the Presidential Fellowship, and the Gordon Harris Fellowship from the University at Buffalo's Department of Chemistry. In 2014, she was honored with the department's Mattern-Tyler Teaching Award as well. In 2012, Ms. Linder received the SUNY Chancellor's Award, as well as an Academic Achievement Award in chemistry and biochemistry from the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at SUNY Oneonta. She was bestowed the Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowship from the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute in 2011. Ms. Linder aims for continued achievements in the field of chemistry as she moves forward in her career.For more information about Ms. Linder, please visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelleklinder About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The Company estimates that it has sufficient cash in hand to last more than one year of operations at the current rate of expenditure. The Company estimates that the cash in hand is sufficient to enable us to perform initial human clinical trials of at least one of our drug candidates. The Company's expenditures during the reported period were on track with this expectation. The Company said its lead drug development program, namely topical skin cream for the treatment of shingles, is progressing satisfactorily, under its HerpeCide™ project. The drug candidates being advanced in the shingles program are variations of the drug candidates that were found to be highly effective against HSV-1 H129 in a lethal animal study with 80-100% of treated animals surviving fully as opposed to untreated animals showing 0% survival, as previously reported. The Company is pursuing at least four different indications with these drug candidates in its HerpeCide™ program, namely, (1) skin cream for the treatment of shingles caused by reactivation of the chickenpox virus (VZV, aka HHV-3), (2) skin cream for the treatment of cold sores (herpes labials) caused by the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), (3)  skin cream for the treatment of genital ulcers caused by HSV-2, and (4) topical eye drops for the treatment of herpes keratitis (mostly caused by HSV-1). The Company recently reported that it has completed certain preliminary ex vivo human skin patch based efficacy studies for its initial drug candidates against shingles, and repeat studies to confirm the results are  in progress. These studies were conducted in the laboratory of Professor Moffat at the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, NY. The Company expects to report on these studies upon approval of the study investigators and their Institute. Further studies towards declaration of the final clinical drug candidate for shingles are continuing. We believe that these human skin patch studies should be highly predictive of human clinical trials success. The Company said its work on the scale-up of manufacturing of the drug candidates in the HerpeCide project is advancing successfully. We are currently working on production at approximately 200g to 500g scales. The Company has recently estimated, with its service providers and industry expert consultants, that a quantity of approximately 1kg of drug candidate will be sufficient for its proposed Safety/toxicology studies for the shingles drug candidate. The Company is on course to have the ability to produce such quantities in its own manufacturing facility once a clinical drug candidate is declared. The Company has continued to focus its work on studies needed for moving the shingles topical treatment towards human clinical trials stage as rapidly as it can. The Company is performing the Chemistry, Manufacture and Controls (CMC) studies needed for filing an Investigational Drug Application (IND) with the US FDA or equivalent application(s) in other countries including Australia, for the shingles drug candidate. In parallel, the Company is performing studies needed to finalize a clinical drug candidate out of several that have shown strong success in cell culture studies. There is no standard animal model for shingles. The Company has eight different drugs in development, including the four indications in the HerpeCide program described above. This deep and wide pipeline demonstrates the robustness of the nanoviricide® platform technology. NanoViricides, Inc. is one of a few bio-pharma companies that has all the capabilities needed from research and development to marketable drug manufacture in the small quantities needed for human clinical trials. Our new campus at 1 Controls Drive, Shelton, CT, has state of the art nanomedicines characterization facilities that enable us to perform IND-enabling nanomedicine analysis and characterization studies of any of our various drug candidates in house. All current topical drug candidates in our HerpeCide™ program are variants of the shingles drug further optimized for the specific herpesvirus and topical delivery constraints. These topical treatments are expected to provide a significantly faster path to human clinical stage than the other injectable and oral drugs in our pipeline. Topical treatments for the herpesvirus indications are important. Although the herpesviruses stay latent in a nerve ganglion, the pathology of an outbreak in a patient begins with reinfection in the skin layer from the reactivated virus, followed by further expansion of the virus in the skin layer. The newly produced virus then causes additional spread of the virus to more nerve cells, and would become latent there. Topical nanoviricide® treatment would stop further expansion of the virus at the site and therefore should also potentially decrease further recurrences. Also, topical treatment allows exposure of the virus to much higher concentrations of the drug locally, and thereby should produce greater effectiveness with less overall drug use, as compared to systemic treatments. There is no effective treatment for shingles and the shingles related PHN (post-herpetic neuralgia). The shingles associated debilitating pain usually lasts during the infection outbreak in most patients, but in some patients, PHN can develop, which can last 90 days to even a year in some cases after the skin has healed. Approved treatments for shingles and PHN include acyclovir related nucleoside analogs that are given in very high doses systemically for a week but with limited effect. A new nucleoside analog called FV-100 is in Phase 3 clinical trials. FV-100 development was previously abandoned by Bristol-Myers-Squibb and is now undertaken by a small pharma. There is also a vaccine for shingles that may reduce occurrence of shingles as a preventive, but not as a treatment after a breakout occurs. Another vaccine is in development. The chickenpox vaccine is now standard for children. However, the incidence of shingles in adolescents and young adults is rising, although shingles generally occurs in older people due age related decrease in immune function, and in patients with immune function compromising conditions from stress to organ transplant to other infections and HIV/AIDS. Although in most patients shingles is debilitating during the outbreak but not life-threatening, in a small percentage of patients, it can cause eye infections that can lead to blindness. There is no topical treatment for shingles. We believe this is an unmet medical need. The market size for a successful topical treatment for shingles could be in the billion dollar range. All of the biological testing and characterization of our drug candidates continues to be performed by external academic or institutional collaborators and contract research organizations (CRO). However, we now have our own capabilities to perform initial cell culture based drug candidate screening for BSL2 viruses, which includes herpesviruses. We believe that this is speeding up our drug development programs against such viruses significantly by removing the latencies of external testing in the earlier drug screening and the later drug optimization stages. The Company has established additional collaborations towards IND-enabling development of drug candidates against the four HerpeCide program indications listed above. We now have collaboration agreements with the CORL at the University of Wisconsin, and the Campbell Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, for the evaluation of its nanoviricides® drug candidates in models of ocular herpesvirus and adenovirus infections. TransPharm Preclinical Solutions, a CRO, will continue to perform testing of our anti-herpes drug candidates in dermal infection models. In addition, we have a collaboration with Professor Moffat Lab at SUNY-UMC to study our drug candidates against shingles. The nanoviricides® mechanism of action is believed to mimic a natural host cell receptor using which the virus binds and infects cells; binding of a nanoviricide nanomicelle to the virus is expected to render it non-infectious. A nanoviricide would thus stop the spread of the viral infection to new uninfected cells. This mechanism is different from that of currently available anti-Herpesvirus drugs. The Company therefore believes that it is able to develop broad-spectrum anti-herpes nanoviricide drugs. About NanoViricides: NanoViricides, Inc. (www.nanoviricides.com) is a development stage company that is creating special purpose nanomaterials for antiviral therapy. The Company's novel nanoviricide® class of drug candidates are designed to specifically attack enveloped virus particles and to dismantle them. The Company is developing drugs against a number of viral diseases including H1N1 swine flu, H5N1 bird flu, seasonal Influenza, HIV, oral and genital Herpes, viral diseases of the eye including EKC and herpes keratitis, Hepatitis C, Rabies, Dengue fever, and Ebola virus, among others. This press release contains forward-looking statements that reflect the Company's current expectation regarding future events. Actual events could differ materially and substantially from those projected herein and depend on a number of factors. Certain statements in this release, and other written or oral statements made by NanoViricides, Inc. are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements since they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that are, in some cases, beyond the Company's control and which could, and likely will, materially affect actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. The Company assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the company's expectations include, but are not limited to, those factors that are disclosed under the heading "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in documents filed by the company from time to time with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission..  Although it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors, they may include the following: demonstration and proof of principle in pre-clinical trials that a nanoviricide is safe and effective; successful development of our product candidates; our ability to seek and obtain regulatory approvals, including with respect to the indications we are seeking; the successful commercialization of our product candidates; and market acceptance of our products. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nanoviricides-files-quarterly-report-for-period-ending-2017-03-31-300458329.html


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Crowley Maritime Corp. awarded four State University of New York (SUNY) Maritime College cadets with Thomas B. Crowley Memorial Scholarships to help further their educational opportunities. Recipients Jacob Ennerfelt, John Szczecinski, Gabrielle McCracken and Kent Napoliello, who will each sail with Crowley this summer, were chosen based on their demonstrated leadership skills, financial need and plans to pursue a career in the marine engineering or shipping industries after graduation. Ennerfelt, from Salisbury, Md., is a third-class cadet majoring in mechanical engineering and pursuing an engine license. His scholastic achievements have earned him a position on the Admiral’s List, the highest honor for undergraduate students. Ennerfelt said funds from the Thomas B. Crowley Memorial Scholarship will allow him to advance his educational career through unique learning opportunities in the maritime industry. He also has a degree in physics and pre-engineering from Salisbury University. Szczecinski, a third-class cadet originally from Newark, Del., is studying marine operations and pursuing an engine license. He is a three-time Admiral’s List honor roll student, plays on the football and basketball teams, and is in the boxing club. He is the youngest of four siblings to graduate from Delaware Military Academy and is confident the scholarship will provide outstanding opportunities to better his career as an engineer. After graduation, he hopes to travel the world. Third-class cadet McCracken, from Sayreville, N.J., is majoring in marine environmental science with a minor in meteorology and oceanography, while also pursuing a deck license. During her time at SUNY, she has served as vice president of Maritime Activities and Programs (MAP), a club that plans events and trips on and off campus. McCracken is also a member of the Big Sister Program, the Environmental Club, the Culture Club, the Newman Club, the Sisters Taking Action for Recruitment (STAR), and the Marine Environmental Science (MES) Student Advisory Board. Napoliello, a second-class cadet from Bay Head, N.J., is studying marine transportation and pursuing a deck license. He is a member of the football and crew teams, the uniform committee, and the Small Vessel Operations Club. While at SUNY, Napoliello has also supported fellow students in the classroom assisting professors of Terrestrial Navigation courses, where cadets learn about nautical charts and plotting, buoys, tides and currents. As he prepares for his junior year, Napoliello is sure this scholarship will provide "once in a lifetime" experiences and knowledge to make him the best and most professional merchant mariner possible. Since 1984, Crowley has provided more than $3 million dollars in scholarship funding for more than 1,000 students. The company has also donated more than $2 million over the years to support other educational programs. In 1994, Chairman and CEO Tom Crowley Jr. established the Thomas B. Crowley Sr. Memorial Scholarship Program in honor of his father who led the company to extraordinary heights before passing away in 1994. The company continues to give scholarship dollars to deserving students in the U.S., Alaska and Puerto Rico. In 2006, the program was expanded to Central America, and to date has provided financial assistance to more than 20 students in that region. To learn more about the Crowley scholarship program, visit http://www.crowley.com/scholarships.


NEW YORK, May 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- In August 2017, the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) will become the second State University of New York (SUNY) institution to offer degree programs at SUNY Korea in Songdo. SUNY is the first American university in Korea and is also SUNY's first global campus outside of the United States. The FIT programs being offered in Korea are Fashion Design and Fashion Business Management―two signature curricula of the college―leading to the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree. These programs reflect the college's historical commitment to providing industry-ready graduates for the fashion industry and its related businesses. Fashion Design is one of the earliest programs ever offered by the college; the Fashion Business Management program is the oldest and largest program of its kind in the United States, providing students a comprehensive business curriculum focused on the fashion industry. FIT's location in Korea makes it the college's third location abroad, along with Milan and Florence, and extends the institution's global reach. The application deadline is June 30 and, after that, admission is on a rolling basis. Admitted students will earn their AAS degree at FIT at SUNY Korea and may then apply to FIT's bachelor's degree programs in New York or in Milan for Fashion Design. "FIT is delighted to be able to offer students from all over Asia―including Japan, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam―the opportunity of an FIT education in Korea," said Dr. Joyce F. Brown, president of FIT. "Students will be able to benefit from FIT's offerings, complete with its curriculum and faculty, on the vibrant and innovative Incheon Global Campus. All of higher education functions globally today, and it is among FIT's goals to educate students to be fluent in this environment." Classes begin on August 25, 2017, at the Incheon Global Campus in Songdo, Korea's only "smart city," which is becoming Northeast Asia's economic hub. The campus features state-of-the-art facilities, classrooms, a library, research labs, a sports center, auditorium, multicultural activity center, dining hall, dormitory, and guest house, among other amenities. The Incheon Global Campus is a national project established by the Korean government and Incheon Metropolitan City. SUNY Korea is the first campus to locate there. SUNY Korea was established in 2012 as the first American university in Korea through the combined effort and investment of the South Korean and U.S. governments and SUNY at Stony Brook University. About SUNY The State University of New York is the largest comprehensive university system in the United States. Its impact in New York State and across the globe begins with 64 institutions, including research universities, academic medical centers, liberal arts colleges, community colleges, colleges of technology, and an online learning network. SUNY serves nearly 1.3 million students, including nearly 600,000 in credit-bearing courses and programs and more than 700,000 through continuing education and community outreach programs. SUNY's nearly 3 million alumni are located around the globe, each making their own unique impact. About FIT The Fashion Institute of Technology, a part of the State University of New York, has been a leader in career education in art, design, business, and technology for more than 70 years. With a curriculum that provides a singular blend of hands-on, practical experience, classroom study, and a firm grounding in the liberal arts, FIT offers a wide range of outstanding programs that are affordable and relevant to today's rapidly changing industries. Internationally renowned, FIT draws on its New York City location to provide a vibrant, creative community in which to learn. The college offers nearly 50 majors and grants AAS, BFA, BS, MA, MFA, and MPS degrees, preparing students for professional success and leadership in the global marketplace. Among notable alumni in fashion are Calvin Klein, Michael Kors, Amsale Aberra, Reem Acra, Brian Atwood, Dennis Basso, Francisco Costa, Norma Kamali, Nanette Lepore, Bibhu Mohapatra, Ralph Rucci, John Bartlett, and Michelle Smith. Other prominent graduates include Leslie Blodgett, creator of bareMinerals; international restaurant designer Tony Chi; Nina Garcia, creative director, Marie Claire; Essie Weingarten, founder of Essie Cosmetics; and Joe Zee, executive creative officer, Yahoo Style.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. - Traditional clinical hearing tests often fail to diagnose patients with a common form of inner ear damage that might otherwise be detected by more challenging behavioral tests, according to the findings of a University at Buffalo-led study published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. This type of "hidden hearing loss" paradoxically presents itself as essentially normal hearing in the clinic, where audiograms -- the gold-standard for measuring hearing thresholds -- are typically conducted in a quiet room. The reason some forms of hearing loss may go unrecognized in the clinic is that hearing involves a complex partnership between the ear and the brain. It turns out that the central auditory system can compensate for significant damage to the inner ear by turning up its volume control, partially overcoming the deficiency, explains Richard Salvi, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Communicative Disorders and Sciences and director of UB's Center for Hearing and Deafness, and the study's lead author. "You can have tremendous damage to inner hair cells in the ear that transmit information to the brain and still have a normal audiogram," says Salvi. "But people with this type of damage have difficulty hearing in certain situations, like hearing speech in a noisy room. Their thresholds appear normal. So they're sent home." To understand why a hearing test isn't identifying a hearing problem it's necessary to follow the auditory pathway as sound-evoked neural signals travel from the ear to the brain. About 95 percent of sound input to the brain comes from the ear's inner hair cells. "These inner hair cells are like spark plugs in an 8-cylinder engine," says Salvi. "A car won't run well if you remove half of those spark plugs, but people can still present with normal hearing thresholds if they've lost half or even three-quarters of their inner hair cells." Ear damage reduces the signal that goes the brain. That results in trouble hearing, but that's not what's happening here, because the brain "has a central gain control, like a radio, the listener can turn up the volume control to better hear a distant station." Salvi says. Sound is converted to neural activity by the inner hair cells in the auditory part of the ear, called the cochlea. Sound-evoked neural activity then travels from the cochlea to the auditory nerve and into the central auditory pathway of the brain. Halfway up the auditory pathway the information is relayed into a structure known as the inferior colliculus, before finally arriving at the auditory cortex in the brain, where interpretation of things like speech take place. For people with inner hair cell loss, sound is less faithfully converted to neural activity in the cochlea. However, this weakened sound-evoked activity is progressively amplified as it travels along the central auditory pathway to the inferior colliculus and onward. By the time it reaches the auditory cortex, things are hyperactive because the brain has recognized a problem. "Once the signal gets high enough to activate a few neurons it's like your brain has a hearing aid that turns up the volume," says Salvi. It's not clear how many people might have this type of hearing loss, but Salvi says it is a common complaint to have difficulty hearing in noisy environments as people get older. The perceptual consequences include apparently normal hearing for tests administered in quiet settings, but adding background noise often results in deficits in detecting and recognizing sounds. "That's why the way we're measuring hearing in the clinic may not be adequate for subtle forms of hearing loss," says one of the study's co-authors, Benjamin Auerbach, a postdoctoral fellow at UB's Center for Hearing and Deafness. In addition to informing how hearing tests are conducted, Auerbach suggests that this compensation might be causing or contributing to other auditory perceptual disorders such as tinnitus, often described as a ringing in the ears, or hyperacusis, a condition that causes moderate everyday sounds to be perceived as intolerably loud. "If you have excessive gain in the central auditory system, it could result in the over-amplification of sound or even make silence sound like noise," says Auerbach.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the State University of New York is now accepting applications for the Carey Gabay Scholarship Program. This scholarship is in honor of Carey Gabay, an attorney and public servant, who was tragically killed as an innocent victim of gun violence in 2015. The program is aimed at providing Full Scholarships to SUNY Colleges For Disadvantage students New York Press Release ~ This program provides full scholarships to five incoming SUNY students who exemplify Carey’s commitment to social justice, leadership, and mentoring, as well as his personal story of succeeding academically despite having an economically disadvantaged background. In September, Governor Cuomo announced the first recipients of the scholarship. "Carey was an exemplary young man who could have done anything, but decided to dedicate his life to public service," Governor Cuomo said. "It is our hope this scholarship program will empower other talented young people to pursue a career in government and in pursuit of improving the lives of their fellow New Yorkers." Carey grew up living in public housing and attending public school in the Bronx. After a successful high school career, he went on to graduate from Harvard University and Harvard Law School. He had a longstanding commitment to public service and giving back to those around him, and while at Harvard University, he ran to become the president of his undergraduate student body. In recent years, he worked tirelessly in public service, first as an Assistant Counsel to Governor Cuomo and later as First Deputy Counsel for the Empire State Development Corporation. The Carey Gabay Scholarship Program will annually award full scholarships to five students to attend four-year SUNY colleges beginning in the 2017-18 school year. These scholarships will cover all costs of attendance, including tuition, room and board, college fees, books and supplies, and transportation and personal expenses. Applications are available here and are due on April 15, 2017.


Andrei E.Y.,Rutgers University | Li G.,Rutgers University | Du X.,SUNY
Reports on Progress in Physics | Year: 2012

This review covers recent experimental progress in probing the electronic properties of graphene and how they are influenced by various substrates, by the presence of a magnetic field and by the proximity to a superconductor. The focus is on results obtained using scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, transport and magnetotransport techniques. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

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