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News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Thousands of scientists and their allies marched on Washington in the pouring April rain on April 22 in defiance of the Trump administration's attacks on the environment and public health. The biggest message given to the umbrella-covered crowd at the March for Science in Washington, DC, however, was not one of scientific facts and figures. It was one of values, and how to communicate them—two things the scientific community has shied away from publicly engaging with in the past. In order for the science community to overcome the polarization that has pigeon holed it onto one side of the political spectrum, argued many speakers, scientists have to set aside the actual science itself and talk about human values that everyone shares. "We can't complain about slashed funding, if we can't explain to taxpayers why science matters!" Chemist and science educator Tyler DeWitt, energetically told the crowd early in the rally.If people don't want the Environmental Protection Agency to lose 30 percent of its budget, they can talk about, say children's' health. Those kinds of issues humanize the need for water treatment and infrastructure, and policies like the Clean Water ActRain-soaked crowds at the science march. Image: Grennan MillikenMari Copeny, a nine-year-old girl from Flint Michigan, where residents are still not able to drink water from the tap, accomplished this effortlessly when she bravely stepped up to the lectern and told the large crowd that "When people don't believe in science, and especially when our government doesn't believe in science, kids get hurt." Some speakers argued that beating climate change deniers over the head with facts about hottest years on record and increased drought (not that those aren't important), won't have an impact in the face of strong political and social ideology. Polarization has created a situation where "the amount of science that we know doesn't change whether, and how much, we think climate change is a serious issue," public policy expert Paul Hirsch from the SUNY college of Environmental Science and Forestry told small crowd of people jammed into a tent in the teach-in area of the rally.  "That's influenced to a much greater degree by our social affiliations and by our political positions and ideology," he continued.Protestors at the March for Science. Image: Grennan MillikenBut, he contended, "take climate change. Whatever side of the debate somebody is on, they are coming from a place of very strong values, and a very strong sense of concern." Climate change deniers, for example, still share values of economic security and national security with those that believe in the proven science. Hirsch concluded that it's up to scientists to be able to recognize a shared value and come from the point of that perspective in further engagement. "It's not about science, per se," he said, pausing while the rain drummed on the tent roof, "it's about the values we articulate."


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Donna L. Carroll, RN to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Donna is a Registered Nurse with two years of experience in her field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially sub acute rehabilitation, palliative care, and long term care. Donna is currently serving patients within the Hospice of Orange and Sullivan Counties, Inc. in Newburgh, New York, and as a Charge Nurse in the sub acute rehabilitation unit within Elant at Goshen. Donna’s career in nursing began in 2015, when she graduated with honors with her Associate of Arts and Sciences Degree in Nursing from SUNY Orange in Middletown, New York. An advocate for continuing education, she is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing with a 4.0 grade point average at Chamberlain College of Nursing with a projected graduation this year. Donna holds additional certifications in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Basic Life Support, and IV Therapy. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, she maintains a professional membership with the American Nurses Association and the New York State Nurses Association. She attributes her success to having supportive nurses, doctors, providers, friends, and family in her life. When she is not assisting her patients, Donna likes to relax by camping, gardening, and traveling. Learn more about Donna here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4136237/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. - Traditional clinical hearing tests often fail to diagnose patients with a common form of inner ear damage that might otherwise be detected by more challenging behavioral tests, according to the findings of a University at Buffalo-led study published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. This type of "hidden hearing loss" paradoxically presents itself as essentially normal hearing in the clinic, where audiograms -- the gold-standard for measuring hearing thresholds -- are typically conducted in a quiet room. The reason some forms of hearing loss may go unrecognized in the clinic is that hearing involves a complex partnership between the ear and the brain. It turns out that the central auditory system can compensate for significant damage to the inner ear by turning up its volume control, partially overcoming the deficiency, explains Richard Salvi, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Communicative Disorders and Sciences and director of UB's Center for Hearing and Deafness, and the study's lead author. "You can have tremendous damage to inner hair cells in the ear that transmit information to the brain and still have a normal audiogram," says Salvi. "But people with this type of damage have difficulty hearing in certain situations, like hearing speech in a noisy room. Their thresholds appear normal. So they're sent home." To understand why a hearing test isn't identifying a hearing problem it's necessary to follow the auditory pathway as sound-evoked neural signals travel from the ear to the brain. About 95 percent of sound input to the brain comes from the ear's inner hair cells. "These inner hair cells are like spark plugs in an 8-cylinder engine," says Salvi. "A car won't run well if you remove half of those spark plugs, but people can still present with normal hearing thresholds if they've lost half or even three-quarters of their inner hair cells." Ear damage reduces the signal that goes the brain. That results in trouble hearing, but that's not what's happening here, because the brain "has a central gain control, like a radio, the listener can turn up the volume control to better hear a distant station." Salvi says. Sound is converted to neural activity by the inner hair cells in the auditory part of the ear, called the cochlea. Sound-evoked neural activity then travels from the cochlea to the auditory nerve and into the central auditory pathway of the brain. Halfway up the auditory pathway the information is relayed into a structure known as the inferior colliculus, before finally arriving at the auditory cortex in the brain, where interpretation of things like speech take place. For people with inner hair cell loss, sound is less faithfully converted to neural activity in the cochlea. However, this weakened sound-evoked activity is progressively amplified as it travels along the central auditory pathway to the inferior colliculus and onward. By the time it reaches the auditory cortex, things are hyperactive because the brain has recognized a problem. "Once the signal gets high enough to activate a few neurons it's like your brain has a hearing aid that turns up the volume," says Salvi. It's not clear how many people might have this type of hearing loss, but Salvi says it is a common complaint to have difficulty hearing in noisy environments as people get older. The perceptual consequences include apparently normal hearing for tests administered in quiet settings, but adding background noise often results in deficits in detecting and recognizing sounds. "That's why the way we're measuring hearing in the clinic may not be adequate for subtle forms of hearing loss," says one of the study's co-authors, Benjamin Auerbach, a postdoctoral fellow at UB's Center for Hearing and Deafness. In addition to informing how hearing tests are conducted, Auerbach suggests that this compensation might be causing or contributing to other auditory perceptual disorders such as tinnitus, often described as a ringing in the ears, or hyperacusis, a condition that causes moderate everyday sounds to be perceived as intolerably loud. "If you have excessive gain in the central auditory system, it could result in the over-amplification of sound or even make silence sound like noise," says Auerbach.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the State University of New York is now accepting applications for the Carey Gabay Scholarship Program. This scholarship is in honor of Carey Gabay, an attorney and public servant, who was tragically killed as an innocent victim of gun violence in 2015. The program is aimed at providing Full Scholarships to SUNY Colleges For Disadvantage students New York Press Release ~ This program provides full scholarships to five incoming SUNY students who exemplify Carey’s commitment to social justice, leadership, and mentoring, as well as his personal story of succeeding academically despite having an economically disadvantaged background. In September, Governor Cuomo announced the first recipients of the scholarship. "Carey was an exemplary young man who could have done anything, but decided to dedicate his life to public service," Governor Cuomo said. "It is our hope this scholarship program will empower other talented young people to pursue a career in government and in pursuit of improving the lives of their fellow New Yorkers." Carey grew up living in public housing and attending public school in the Bronx. After a successful high school career, he went on to graduate from Harvard University and Harvard Law School. He had a longstanding commitment to public service and giving back to those around him, and while at Harvard University, he ran to become the president of his undergraduate student body. In recent years, he worked tirelessly in public service, first as an Assistant Counsel to Governor Cuomo and later as First Deputy Counsel for the Empire State Development Corporation. The Carey Gabay Scholarship Program will annually award full scholarships to five students to attend four-year SUNY colleges beginning in the 2017-18 school year. These scholarships will cover all costs of attendance, including tuition, room and board, college fees, books and supplies, and transportation and personal expenses. Applications are available here and are due on April 15, 2017.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tampa, Fla. (May 1, 2017) - At the 24rd Annual Conference of the American Society of Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR), held April 27-29 in Clearwater Beach, Florida, ASNTR awarded The 2017 Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair to Li-Ru Zhao, PhD, MD, a tenured Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University and research scientist at the Syracuse (NY) Veterans Administration Medical Center. The award, presented to her on Saturday April 29, recognized her significant research contributions in acute and chronic stroke, vascular dementia, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Zhao received her MD from Hebei Medical College in Shijizhaung China in 1982 and her PhD in neuroscience from the Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden in 2004. She carried out postdoctoral work at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis. She subsequently served as a researcher and assistant at Northwestern University, and associate professor at Louisiana State University prior to coming to SUNY Upstate Medical University and the Syracuse VA Medical Center. Dr. Zhao's extensive investigation into potential treatments for the debilitating effects of stroke includes the first demonstration of the neuroprotective properties of stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and SCF + G-CSF combinations in treating the effects of acute and chronic stroke. She discovered that these growth factors - naturally occurring substances capable of stimulating cellular growth, proliferation and healing - could be used alone or in combination to reduced brain damage from stroke and improve motor function. Her many studies into SCF and G-CSF used a variety of approaches, including molecular and cell biology as well as brain and cell imaging. Her contributions to Alzheimer's disease (AD) research have investigated how amyloid plaques in the brain (one of the causes thought to be behind the development of AD) might be cleared by injections of bone marrow-derived monocytes/macrophages (BMDMs) and SCF+G-CSF, all of which have been found to be low in the blood and bone marrow of AD patients. In her most recent stroke studies she is investigating Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), the most common yet rare form of hereditary stroke disorder. Using animal models, she found that neural stem cells were radically reduced in patients with CADSIL, causing cognitive impairment. Currently, there is no drug that can improve the functional or delay the progressive brain damage caused by CADASIL. Her laboratory is currently studying how the bone marrow stem cell factors (SCF and G-CSF) repair the brain in both AD and CADASIL and is working at determining how the bone marrow stem cell factors regulate neuronal process formation, synaptic generation, and stem cell growth and differentiation. "Dr. Zhao's studies have significantly advanced our understanding about the contribution of SCF and G-CSF in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, scientist emeritus at the National Institutes of Health and an adjunct professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "She has also carried out exceptional service activities as a peer reviewer for grants for NIH, AHA, and Alzheimer's Association, as well as for a large number of scientific journals." According to Dr. Hoffer, she has successfully balanced her career and personal life, including raising an "exceptionally gifted" son who is currently a resident in neurosurgery at University Hospitals of Cleveland. The award Dr. Zhao received is named for Bernard Sanberg, father of Dr. Paul Sanberg (University of South Florida), a co-founder of the ASNTR. After Bernard Sanberg died of a stroke in 1999, the award bearing his name was established and is presented by the ASNTR annually to an individual who has made outstanding research contributions in the field of neural therapy and repair. The award, first presented in 2000, is presented every year at ASNTR's Annual Meeting. Recent past winners of the Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair include: Mariana E. Emborg, PhD, MD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John D. Elsworth, PhD, Yale School of Medicine, Douglas Kondziolka, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center; Mike Modo, PhD, University of Pittsburgh; Timothy Collier, PhD, Michigan State University; Donald Eugene Redmond, MD, Yale University; Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD, China Medical University; Howard J. Federoff, MD, PhD, Georgetown University; Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health ASNTR's 25th Annual Conference will be held April 25-29, 2018 in Clearwater Beach, Florida. For more information, email Donna Morrison dmorriso@health.usf.edu or visit the ASNTR website http://www. ASNTR is a society for basic and clinical neuroscientists using a variety of technologies to better understand how the nervous system functions and establish new procedures for its repair in response to trauma or neurodegenerative disease. Member scientists employ stem/neural cell transplantation, gene therapy, trophic factor and neuroprotective compound administration and other approaches.


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Paris-based Nanobiotix is a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company that is spearheading efforts to harness physics rather than biology, as a way to destroy cancer cells. Founded in 2003 by CEO Laurent Levy, Ph.D., as a spin-off the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo, the company's novel approach uses nanoparticles to boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and, potentially, immunotherapies. Levy, who has been working in the nanotechnology field for two decades, spoke to Bioscience Technology about the company’s lead product NBTXR3, and how it can enhance radiotherapy for a number of indications currently in clinical trials. The company’s first foray is into radiotherapy, also known as radiation therapy, and was chosen for a few reasons, Levy said.  For one, it is one of the most widely used treatments in oncology, with 60 percent of all cancer patients receiving radiotherapy during treatment. Secondly, it is a patient population that are usually untapped by the pharmaceutical or biotech companies, so there is a widely open market with a patient population that does not have many treatment opportunities outside of radiotherapy.  Finally, when a physician wants to eradicate a tumor with radiation, the x-ray beam also has to go through healthy tissue too, often causing damage, which limits the dose that can be delivered. “So the key question is, how can we improve the dose within the tumor, without increasing the dose in surrounding healthy tissue?” Levy said. “We have developed a technology exactly to answer this question.” Based on nanotechnology, the company developed an inorganic, crystalline nanoparticle that is 50 nanometers, made with hafnium oxide. This particular material was chosen because it is a highly dense material that has the ability to absorb x-rays. Also, the material is super inert, Levy explained, so it’s able to optimize the benefit/risk ratio for patients.  The benefit being the amount of x-ray absorption, and minimizing the risk by having an inert material with low toxicity. “So the goal of the company is really to try to transform today’s radiotherapy into nanoradiotherapy,” Levy said. “To make it more efficient and less toxic.” The company now has a pipeline of seven indications ongoing, including its most clinically advanced which is a Phase 2/3 in soft tissue sarcoma ongoing in Europe and Asia.  They also have two different clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients and one in prostate cancer patients running in the U.S., as well as early clinical trials in liver cancers. Nanobiotix plans to present data from it's European Phase 1/2 head and neck cancer trial at the American Sociatey of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in June. Levy said that the company has such a wide pipeline because the product has a physical mode of action and potentially could be applied across oncology. The only change to current patient flow is that patients receive a one-time injection of the nanoparticle, directly into the tumor one day before the first session of radiotherapy. Once the nanoparticles enter tumor cells, they are activated by standard dose of radiation and release a tremendous amount of energy that destroys cancer cells, while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues, which only receive the same dose of radiation as is standard in radiotherapy. The soft-tissue sarcoma trial is a two-arm trial involving 156 patients, with half receiving radiotherapy alone, and half receiving radiotherapy plus Nanobiotix’s nanoparticles. At the end of March the Independent Data Monitoring Committee recommended a continuation of the Phase 2/3 trial after completing an interim evaluation of the trial, based on an analysis of the results of two-thirds, or 104 patients. The primary endpoint in the prospective, randomized, multi-center, open label and active controlled study is the complete pathological response rate. Secondary endpoints include the objective response rate by MRI imaging, evaluation of safety profile, and tumor volume changes. A full data analysis is expected by the end of 2017, and NBTXR3 could obtain European market approval later this year. While the company has not disclosed plans for its pathway in the U.S. market, Levy said the company also has one Investigational New Drug application open in the U.S., and its goal is to move forward in the U.S., along with Europe, once it sees more data from its head and neck cancer trial. Levy believes their novel approach has the potential to impact many cancers. “From our perspective, we think that the beauty of nanotechnology is that you bring a completely different mode of action into the oncology field,” he said. With a biological approach, Levy said, one could take hundreds of cancer cells, some of which will be destroyed by chemo, some that will not be destroyed at all because they don’t express the right receptor, and some that will start dying but will then develop some resistance and regrow again. “When you use physics, you bring something that a cancer cell cannot resist,” he said. Coming up, Nanobiotix hopes to present more data by mid-year supporting an approach to use their lead product in combination with immuno-oncology drugs.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Long Island plastic surgeon Dr. James Romanelli (http://www.jrcs.com) is proud to announce a $2,500 scholarship contest open to first-year students accepted to an accredited New York medical school. "I want to support the training of New York's next generation of physicians," Dr. Romanelli says. "This contest is designed to have students think about the big picture of what it means to be a doctor. As a Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, I enjoy introducing medical students to the art and science of surgery." Dr. Romanelli, whose cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery practice on Long Island is in Huntington, N.Y., earned his medical degree from State University of New York at Downstate in Brooklyn and he is Chief of Staff at Huntington Hospital. His roots in New York medical community are deep. The contest is open to students 18 and older who have recently been accepted to one of the 14 medical school programs in New York accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. The winner must be preparing to start medical school in 2017. "This scholarship contest encourages students embarking on the first step of their medical career to consider how they can make a difference through medicine," Dr. Romanelli says. The contest rules are straightforward: Submit a video that answers the question, "What would you like to achieve as a physician?" The video shouldn't be longer than 3 minutes and students must upload the video to YouTube. The first 100 eligible videos received will be in the running for the $2,500 prize. “We want to encourage entrants to be creative and imaginative in their video presentations,” Dr. Romanelli says. “We want to see their personality and passion shine through.” Students can submit videos through May 31 or until it has received 100 eligible entries, whichever comes first. Dr. Romanelli and his team will view all of the videos between June 1 and June 11 (the "judging period") and select 5 finalists. The 5 finalist videos will be featured on the practice website, and the public will be invited to vote for their favorite. The open voting occurs from June 12 to June 26, and the winner will be announced on June 30. The practice will send the $2,500 for tuition directly to the winner’s school on their behalf. A complete guide to the contest, including all the rules, can be found on Romanelli Cosmetic Surgery's website. Dr. James Romanelli (http://www.jrcs.com) is a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in body, face, and breast enhancement. He practices with Dr. David Pincus, a young gifted plastic surgeon who joined the practice in 2015. After earning his medical degree from SUNY Downstate, Dr. Romanelli undertook 8 years of postgraduate specialty training in general surgery, plastic surgery, and hand surgery. He serves as Chief of Staff at Huntington Hospital Northwell Health, in addition to providing a full range of procedures through his cosmetic surgery practice on Long Island.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Mississauga, Canada, April 28, 2017 --( Today’s consumers demand credible references at their fingertips, before making healthcare decisions. Doctors’ Choice Awards (DCA) satisfies that need by publishing verified, valid reviews about doctors, by doctors. This unique concept acknowledges that medical professionals are well-suited to evaluating the performance of others in the industry. DCA puts that feedback into the hands of consumers in a readily-accessible online platform. DCA Award Winners benchmark standards of care in their areas of specialty. In 2016, Dr. Oheb received 27 favorable reviews from other medical professional, in the Doctor’s Choice Awards program. The quality and quantity of this response ensured National honors for Dr. Oheb, in the area of Orthopedics. He was also a DCA City Winner in 2016. Dr. Oheb shares thoughts on winning the Doctors’ Choice Awards 2016 National Award. “The DCA National Award is truly an honor. Caring for others, helping them feel good and get their lives back to normal, has been my passion since I began training for this career. It is extremely gratifying to know that highly-esteemed peers recognize my dedication and are willing to share their perceptions with the public.” About Dr. Oheb Dr. Oheb earned degrees in economics and chemistry from SUNY Binghamton University in just three years. It took only another year and a half for him to attain an MBA, also from SUNY. He graduated from SUNY Upstate Medical University in the top five percent of medical students in the country, achieving AOA honors. Specialization in orthopedic surgery took place at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He also completed fellowship in hand surgery at the Oklahoma Hand Surgery Institute. Dr. Oheb is an enthusiastic bodybuilder, which provides personal insight into the emotional and physical challenges faced by many of the athlete patients he treats. About Doctors’ Choice Awards DCA is a resource for physicians from around the world to connect and reconnect, for the benefit of the healthcare purchasing public. DCA invites physicians and those who provide services to doctors to show their respect for mentors, teachers, classmates, colleagues, and referring doctors with whom they have first-hand experience. The validity of DCA is underscored by the core value that these awards cannot be purchased. They must be earned through positive reviews by peers. For more information, contact: Dr. Jonathan Oheb Phone – 818-361-0136 Website – www.jonathanohebmd.com Andra Salim Doctors’ Choice Awards Phone – 312-239-0638 Email – andra@doctorschoiceawards.org Website – www.doctorschoiceawards.org Mississauga, Canada, April 28, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Doctors’ Choice Awards proudly announces Jonathan Oheb, MD as National Award Winner in the orthopedic specialty. He earned this merit through a commitment to treatment excellence and outcomes and compassionate care, in the opinions of colleagues. Dr. Oheb provides orthopedic and hand surgery at his own practice in Encino, CA. He also offers a comprehensive range of nonsurgical treatments for orthopedic conditions of the shoulder, ankle, knee, and hip.Today’s consumers demand credible references at their fingertips, before making healthcare decisions. Doctors’ Choice Awards (DCA) satisfies that need by publishing verified, valid reviews about doctors, by doctors. This unique concept acknowledges that medical professionals are well-suited to evaluating the performance of others in the industry. DCA puts that feedback into the hands of consumers in a readily-accessible online platform. DCA Award Winners benchmark standards of care in their areas of specialty.In 2016, Dr. Oheb received 27 favorable reviews from other medical professional, in the Doctor’s Choice Awards program. The quality and quantity of this response ensured National honors for Dr. Oheb, in the area of Orthopedics. He was also a DCA City Winner in 2016.Dr. Oheb shares thoughts on winning the Doctors’ Choice Awards 2016 National Award. “The DCA National Award is truly an honor. Caring for others, helping them feel good and get their lives back to normal, has been my passion since I began training for this career. It is extremely gratifying to know that highly-esteemed peers recognize my dedication and are willing to share their perceptions with the public.”About Dr. OhebDr. Oheb earned degrees in economics and chemistry from SUNY Binghamton University in just three years. It took only another year and a half for him to attain an MBA, also from SUNY. He graduated from SUNY Upstate Medical University in the top five percent of medical students in the country, achieving AOA honors. Specialization in orthopedic surgery took place at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He also completed fellowship in hand surgery at the Oklahoma Hand Surgery Institute. Dr. Oheb is an enthusiastic bodybuilder, which provides personal insight into the emotional and physical challenges faced by many of the athlete patients he treats.About Doctors’ Choice AwardsDCA is a resource for physicians from around the world to connect and reconnect, for the benefit of the healthcare purchasing public. DCA invites physicians and those who provide services to doctors to show their respect for mentors, teachers, classmates, colleagues, and referring doctors with whom they have first-hand experience. The validity of DCA is underscored by the core value that these awards cannot be purchased. They must be earned through positive reviews by peers.For more information, contact:Dr. Jonathan OhebPhone – 818-361-0136Website – www.jonathanohebmd.comAndra SalimDoctors’ Choice AwardsPhone – 312-239-0638Email – andra@doctorschoiceawards.orgWebsite – www.doctorschoiceawards.org Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from DoctorsChoiceAwards


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2017, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, right, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders appear onstage together during an event at New York's LaGuardia Community College. It's the hope of proponents such as Sanders and Hillary Clinton, who made debt-free college a key talking point in their Democratic presidential campaigns, that New York's first-in-the-nation free tuition program for middle-class students will spread to other states. And that's the prediction of Cuomo, its main champion, who called the plan a "model for the nation." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Will New York's first-in-the-nation free tuition program for middle-class college students spread to other states? That's the hope of proponents such as Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, who made debt-free college a key talking point in their Democratic presidential campaigns. And that's the prediction of its main champion, Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who called the plan a "model for the nation." But even as higher education experts applaud the concept of free tuition, they question finer points of New York's plan and whether it's a model that should be replicated elsewhere. New York's plan would cover in-state public college tuition for full-time students whose families earn $125,000 or less, a benefit that could extend to 32,000 students a year. Some experts are concerned the plan would actually do little to help the neediest students, whose tuition is already covered by other aid. They also question the plan not addressing other college costs beyond tuition. And there has already been much debate about a restriction — added late in the negotiations — that recipients live and work in the state for the number of years they receive the benefit. If students move out of state, the money would be converted into a loan that must be repaid. "Students are not going to plan for future debt because they're going to think they don't have any," said Sara Goldrick-Rab, a Temple University expert on college affordability issues. "And then they'll get a job in another state and they're going to get smacked in the face literally by the state of New York for the bill." Goldrick-Rab said the restriction betrays students by changing the narrative from broad free college tuition to a workforce development initiative. State University of New York Chancellor Nancy Zimpher says the controversy may be overblown, noting that about 85 percent of graduates from the state university system stay in New York after graduation anyway. "It kind of tamps down the drama," she said. Even Sanders, who has long advocated addressing the nation's $1.3 trillion student debt problem, acknowledged there are some aspects of New York's plan he disagrees with. But he gave Cuomo and New York lawmakers credit for being first to tackle it. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android. "They have paved the way for other states to go forward, for the federal government to go forward to make public colleges and universities tuition free," the Vermont senator said in an interview with The Associated Press. "I see that as a tremendous achievement, and we look forward to other states following New York." Barmak Nassirian, director of federal relations and policy analysis for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, agreed New York's program is a strong political move but questioned an execution that "borders on gimmicky." He was particularly critical of New York's "last-dollar" tuition-only setup, which would keep costs relatively low — an estimated $163 million a year — by paying the tuition only after awards from state and federal sources are applied. Students from families making $50,000 or less wouldn't benefit because their tuition is already covered by other programs. "Unfortunately, the neediest are left with nothing but a feel-good message," Nassirian said. SUNY's Zimpher responded that the state's program extends possibilities to kids on the "edge" of other financial assistance programs who might have never thought college was possible. Other experts have noted that the New York program covers only tuition, with no additional money for other college fees such as room and board and books, which can be substantial. Over the course of four years at a State University of New York college, tuition would make up only about $26,000 of the total $83,000 tab. Despite such uncertainties, Nassirian also gave credit to Cuomo, who has been mentioned as a possible 2020 presidential candidate, for giving the concept of free college new life. "The pressure now builds," he said, "for others in deep blue states to do something." The closest currently is Rhode Island, where Democratic Gov. Gina Raimondo is pushing to make two years of public college free for residents, regardless of income. Tennessee and Oregon already offer free in-state tuition at community colleges.


Andrei E.Y.,Rutgers University | Li G.,Rutgers University | Du X.,SUNY
Reports on Progress in Physics | Year: 2012

This review covers recent experimental progress in probing the electronic properties of graphene and how they are influenced by various substrates, by the presence of a magnetic field and by the proximity to a superconductor. The focus is on results obtained using scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, transport and magnetotransport techniques. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

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