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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, May 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- In late April 2017, thought-leaders including Ministers, Former Ministers and representatives from government bodies and prominent economists specializing in sustainable development from the ASEAN region and Australia gathered at Sunway University in Sunway City, Malaysia. The gathering at a two-day ASEAN Ministers Workshop 2017 (AMW) was to share and improve their respective national strategies, and to formulate a regional mechanism to implement the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Southeast Asia. Among the ASEAN Ministers who attended the first of its kind workshop were: Datuk Seri Abdul Rahman bin Dahlan, Minister in charge of the Economic Planning Unit, Malaysia; Dr Bambang Brodjonegoro, Minister of National Development Planning, Indonesia; and Saleumxay Kommasith, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lao PDR. Tan Sri Dr Ramon V Navaratnam, Pro Chancellor of Sunway University welcomed all the delegates to the workshop. In his welcome speech he emphasized on the important role corporates and SMEs play in supporting sustainable development, citing that it is in their best interest to support sustainable development as it will benefit their businesses in the future. "This first AMW will be the catalyst of an annual high-level event for the ASEAN Ministers to meet, discuss and work towards achieving the SDGs for the region. The Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC) is committed to support the UN's blueprint for ending poverty in the world in the context of sustainable development and building a sustainable future for all," said Professor Woo Wing Thye, Chair, AMW Organizing Committee. With three plenary discussions focused on the ASEAN Experience, the Australian Experience and the Action Items for Southeast Asia, the workshop also included a public lecture by Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of JSC and a dialogue with the attending ASEAN ministers. Taking a question from a member of the audience, Professor Jeffrey Sachs shared that universities have an important role to play in helping ASEAN countries attain the SDGs through higher education. From the development of deep excellence in science, technology, engineering and areas essential to supporting sustainable policy development, Professor Jeffrey Sachs urged universities to consider becoming incubators for SDG start-ups. During the plenary discussion on Implementing SDGs: The ASEAN Experience, keynote speaker Datuk Seri Abdul bin Rahman Dahlan spoke of Malaysia's commitment to adopting the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development via the Eleventh Malaysia Plan (2016 to 2020). Looking forward to getting everyone to work together to make the world a better place, Abdul Rahman shared the willingness of Malaysia to work with regional and international partners towards making the 17 SDG goals a reality. Among those who participated in the workshop were Dato' Dr Abdul Rashid Abdul Malik, CEO, Pulau Banding Foundation; Professor John Thwaites, Co-chair SDSN Leadership Council and Chair Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Australia; Professor Gamini Herath, Professor of Economics, School of Business, Monash University Malaysia; Professor Phouphet Kyophilavong, Vice-Dean of Economics, National University of Lao; Professor Sumiani Yusoff, Dean, Sustainability Science Research Cluster, Universiti Malaya; Professor Noraini Tamin, IPBES, Expert of Land Degradation and Restoration; Rosemarie G Edillon, Undersecretary of the National Development Office for Policy and Planning, National Economic and Development Authority, Philippines; Dr Somkiat Triratpan, Secretary to the Minister attached to the Prime Minister's Office, Thailand; Philip Green, First Assistant Secretary, Southeast Asia Mainland and Regional Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australia; Professor Vu Quoc Huy, Director, Institute of Regional Sustainable Development, Vietnamese Academy of Social Sciences; and Professor Graeme Wilkinson, Vice-Chancellor of Sunway University. The workshop was sponsored and organized by the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation (JCF); and co-organized by the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC), Jeffrey Cheah Institute on Southeast Asia (JCI), Pulau Banding Foundation, UKM's Lestari and hosted by Sunway University. About the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development The Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC) was established through a substantial gift from the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation to the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network to support the global effort to achieve the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations in 2015. The Center is housed at Sunway University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Its vision is to embed sustainable development practices in everyday life. JSC will collaborate with government agencies, private sector groups, and civil society to formulate public policies and actions to realize the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. It will serve as the Southeast Asia regional hub of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network to promote green development and social progress through research and education. For further queries, kindly contact the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development at jsc@sunway.edu.my.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Tan Sri Dr Ramon V Navaratnam, Pro Chancellor of Sunway University welcomed all the delegates to the workshop. In his welcome speech he emphasized on the important role corporates and SMEs play in supporting sustainable development, citing that it is in their best interest to support sustainable development as it will benefit their businesses in the future. "This first AMW will be the catalyst of an annual high-level event for the ASEAN Ministers to meet, discuss and work towards achieving the SDGs for the region. The Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC) is committed to support the UN's blueprint for ending poverty in the world in the context of sustainable development and building a sustainable future for all," said Professor Woo Wing Thye, Chair, AMW Organizing Committee. With three plenary discussions focused on the ASEAN Experience, the Australian Experience and the Action Items for Southeast Asia, the workshop also included a public lecture by Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of JSC and a dialogue with the attending ASEAN ministers. Taking a question from a member of the audience, Professor Jeffrey Sachs shared that universities have an important role to play in helping ASEAN countries attain the SDGs through higher education. From the development of deep excellence in science, technology, engineering and areas essential to supporting sustainable policy development, Professor Jeffrey Sachs urged universities to consider becoming incubators for SDG start-ups. During the plenary discussion on Implementing SDGs: The ASEAN Experience, keynote speaker Datuk Seri Abdul bin Rahman Dahlan spoke of Malaysia's commitment to adopting the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development via the Eleventh Malaysia Plan (2016 to 2020). Looking forward to getting everyone to work together to make the world a better place, Abdul Rahman shared the willingness of Malaysia to work with regional and international partners towards making the 17 SDG goals a reality. Among those who participated in the workshop were Dato' Dr Abdul Rashid Abdul Malik, CEO, Pulau Banding Foundation; Professor John Thwaites, Co-chair SDSN Leadership Council and Chair Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Australia; Professor Gamini Herath, Professor of Economics, School of Business, Monash University Malaysia; Professor Phouphet Kyophilavong, Vice-Dean of Economics, National University of Lao; Professor Sumiani Yusoff, Dean, Sustainability Science Research Cluster, Universiti Malaya; Professor Noraini Tamin, IPBES, Expert of Land Degradation and Restoration; Rosemarie G Edillon, Undersecretary of the National Development Office for Policy and Planning, National Economic and Development Authority, Philippines; Dr Somkiat Triratpan, Secretary to the Minister attached to the Prime Minister's Office, Thailand; Philip Green, First Assistant Secretary, Southeast Asia Mainland and Regional Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australia; Professor Vu Quoc Huy, Director, Institute of Regional Sustainable Development, Vietnamese Academy of Social Sciences; and Professor Graeme Wilkinson, Vice-Chancellor of Sunway University. The workshop was sponsored and organized by the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation (JCF); and co-organized by the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC), Jeffrey Cheah Institute on Southeast Asia (JCI), Pulau Banding Foundation, UKM's Lestari and hosted by Sunway University. About the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development The Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development (JSC) was established through a substantial gift from the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation to the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network to support the global effort to achieve the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations in 2015. The Center is housed at Sunway University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Its vision is to embed sustainable development practices in everyday life. JSC will collaborate with government agencies, private sector groups, and civil society to formulate public policies and actions to realize the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. It will serve as the Southeast Asia regional hub of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network to promote green development and social progress through research and education. For further queries, kindly contact the Jeffrey Sachs Center on Sustainable Development at ="x-webdoc://61E235FC-E8D0-45E0-B155-CF6938EBA739/jsc@sunway.edu.my" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">jsc@sunway.edu.my To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/asean-ministers-convene-at-sunway-university-to-drive-regional-sdg-agenda-300450285.html


An overview of supramolecular assembly sustained by intermolecular contacts pertinent to the coordination chemistry community is presented. Herein, the supramolecular architectures sustained by secondary bonding, encompassing tetrel, pnictogen and chalcogen bonding, interactions occurring between metal centres, metal⋯hydrogen, metal⋯π, main group element(lone pair)⋯π, and finally, those involving chelate rings sustained by formal bonding or by hydrogen bonding are described. Whenever possible, comments are included on the nature of the intermolecular interactions and information on the energy of stabilisation they impart. A wide range of intermolecular connectivities are applicable to heavy element compounds and these complement the more established hydrogen bonding and halogen bonding. Interestingly, the energies associated with "emerging" intermolecular interactions often approach those of conventional intermolecular interactions suggesting these may be competitive in directing the way molecules assemble in the condensed phase. © 2017.


Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a model of competitiveness for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by investigating the structural relationship between organizational structure, knowledge quality (KQ) dimensions, improvisational creativity, compositional creativity and innovation in an emerging market – Malaysia – grounding in sense-making and organizational improvisational theories. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 358 valid questionnaires administered among SMEs’ top management were used in examining the measurement model and structural relationship between latent constructs using partial least squares (PLS) path-modelling approach. Findings: The findings indicate that a flat organizational structure influences business entities’ sense-making activities in the way they realize the intrinsic value of knowledge (intrinsic KQ) and take action to apply the organizational knowledge (actionable KQ). These sense-making activities are also conducive to SMEs’ improvisational creativity, compositional creativity and innovative capabilities. All KQ dimensions are positively interrelated, thus supporting sense-making theory. Originality/value: A sustainable competitive advantage for SMEs requires a setting that is based on a lean, decentralized and cooperative organizational structure that shapes organizational KQ. As a contribution to the literature, accessibility KQ is introduced as a KQ dimension. Even though previous research was unclear on the reflectiveness/formativeness of KQ, by applying confirmatory tetrad analysis-PLS, this study empirically supports that KQ is a formative construct. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.


Lee C.Y.,Sunway University
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology | Year: 2013

Psychosocial stress is reported to be one of the main causes of obesity. Based on observations in studies that relate stress and gut inflammation to obesity, the present study hypothesized that chronic stress, via inflammation, alters the expression of nutrient transporters and contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. Rats were exposed to restraint stress for 4 h/day for 5 days/week for eight consecutive weeks. Different segments of rat intestine were then collected and analysed for signs of pathophysiological changes and the expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like-1 (NPC1L1), sodium-dependent glucose transporter-1 (SLC5A1, previously known as SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter-2 (SLC2A2, previously known as GLUT2). In a separate experiment, the total anti-oxidant activity (TAA)-time profile of control isolated intestinal segments was measured. Stress decreased the expression of NPC1L1 in the ileum and upregulated SLC5A1 in both the jejunum and ileum and SLC2A2 in the duodenum. Inflammation and morphological changes were observed in the proximal region of the intestine of stressed animals. Compared with jejunal and ileal segments, the rate of increase in TAA was higher in the duodenum, indicating that the segment contained less anti-oxidants; anti-oxidants may function to protect the tissues. In conclusion, stress alters the expression of hexose and lipid transporters in the gut. The site-specific increase in the expression of SLC5A1 and SLC2A2 may be correlated with pathological changes in the intestine. The ileum may be protected, in part, by gut anti-oxidants. Collectively, the data suggest that apart from causing inflammation, chronic stress may promote sugar uptake and contribute to hyperglycaemia. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.


Statins are known to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in primary and secondary prevention studies. Subsequently, a number of nonrandomised studies have shown statins improve clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). Small randomised controlled trials (RCT) also show improved cardiac function, reduced inflammation and mortality with statins in HF. However, the findings of two large RCTs do not support the evidence provided by previous studies and suggest statins lack beneficial effects in HF. Two meta-analyses have shown statins do not improve survival, whereas two others showed improved cardiac function and reduced inflammation in HF. It appears lipophilic statins produce better survival and other outcome benefits compared to hydrophilic statins. But the two types have not been compared in direct comparison trials in HF. We will conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of lipophilic and hydrophilic statin therapy in patients with HF. Our objectives are:1. To determine the effects of lipophilic statins on (1) mortality, (2) hospitalisation for worsening HF, (3) cardiac function and (4) inflammation.2. To determine the effects of hydrophilic statins on (1) mortality, (2) hospitalisation for worsening HF, (3) cardiac function and (4) inflammation.3. To compare the efficacy of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins on HF outcomes with an adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis.We will conduct an electronic search of databases for RCTs that evaluate statins in patients with HF. The reference lists of all identified studies will be reviewed. Two independent reviewers will conduct the search. The inclusion criteria include:1. RCTs comparing statins with placebo or no statin in patients with symptomatic HF.2. RCTs that employed the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle in data analysis.3. Symptomatic HF patients of all aetiologies and on standard treatment.4. Statin of any dose as intervention.5. Placebo or no statin arm as control.The exclusion criteria include:1. RCTs involving cerivastatin in HF patients.2. RCTs with less than 4 weeks of follow-up. We will perform an adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in patients with HF using placebo or no statin arm as common comparator.


Choy M.-K.,University of Cambridge | Phipps M.E.,Sunway University
Trends in Molecular Medicine | Year: 2010

The human major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is one of the genes in the HLA class I region of chromosome 6. Unlike HLA classical class I gene products, MICA does not present any antigen but acts as a ligand for several immune cells including natural killer (NK) cells bearing NKG2D receptors. MICA is the member of the non-classical class I family that displays the greatest degree of polymorphism. MICA alleles can be divided into two large groups with the polymorphisms found in α3 domains. This division could be explained by a possible polyphyletic origin that is in line with recent findings from evolutionary, population and functional studies of this gene. MICA polymorphisms are associated with a number of diseases related to NK activity, such as viral infection, cancer and allograft rejection or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The mechanisms underlying these associations include NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and MICA shedding to produce immunosuppressive soluble MICA particles. The MICA-induced humoral response has attracted interest recently because of its possible role in graft rejection in solid organ transplantation. Here, we discuss the genetics and biology of the MICA gene and its products, and their importance in disease. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Li J.,University of Hong Kong | Soh A.K.,Sunway University
Acta Materialia | Year: 2013

An attempt has been made to illustrate a new physical mode of plastic deformation in nanocrystalline materials that synergizes two processes, i.e. grain boundary (GB) sliding and stress-driven shear-coupled GB migration. The latter process incorporates a rotational and a translational plastic flow, in which a normal migration is coupled with a shear. The energy change resulting from the above-mentioned mode was calculated, and showed that the new deformation mode was much more energetically favorable than both the pure GB sliding mode and the cooperative process of GB sliding and migration without a coupling shear. In addition, the new deformation mode considerably enhances the ductility of nanocrystalline materials compared with the other two above-mentioned processes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Ong K.S.,Sunway University
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2011

High ambient temperatures coupled with high humidity lead to uncomfortable conditions that are non-conducive for human comfort and productivity. Heat transmission through the roof could be reduced by providing insulation in the attic under the roof or above the ceiling. A roof solar collector could provide both ventilation and cooling in the attic. Several laboratory sized units of passive roof designs were constructed and tested side-by-side under outdoor conditions to obtain temperature data of the roof, attic and ceiling in order to compare their performances. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Chew J.J.,Sunway University | Doshi V.,Sunway University
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2011

Biomass and its utilization have been intimately associated to renewable energy in the recent years. However, the undesirable properties of biomass such as high moisture content and its heterogeneous nature pose a barrier to its competitiveness in the energy generation market. A viable option to overcome the issues associated with biomass feedstock is to carry out a pretreatment process called torrefaction. Torrefaction is a mild pyrolysis process carried out at 200-300 °C under inert condition. In this review, a survey of the recent research work on torrefaction is presented. The properties of biomass before and after torrefaction are discussed. Literature data are tabulated for various types of biomass utilized in the torrefaction study. A brief account on the kinetic study is outlined in the present paper. Some aspects of recent commercial development in the torrefaction process are reviewed and cited. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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