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Netiv Haasara, Israel

Elizabeth Sloan A.,Sunset Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2010

Some of the top functional food trends that are targeting an increasing requirement of consumer health and wellness needs are discussed. Consumers are aimed towards foods with lower fat, calories, and sodium content to refocus on traditional strategies for improving their diets. Studies have found that nearly one-third (31%) of consumers are eating more fish and seafood at home and in restaurants. The American Heart Assn. does not recommend use of antioxidant vitamin supplements, but consumers continue to strongly associate antioxidants with heart health benefits and also to make health linkages with antioxidants and free radicals, aging, and skin. Healthful restaurant snacks represent an untapped market, ranking third on the hot list for quick-service operators in 2010. Older adults are the most likely to be on a special diet, with 65+, 38% are on a low-fat diet, 34% low-salt, 28% low-sugar, and 26% high-fiber. Source


Sloan A.E.,Sunset Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Consumer demands and retailer preferences for more naturally nutritious, no additives/preservatives, and less-processed foods are restructuring the global food industry and sending US sales of natural foods and beverages soaring. Despite the weak economy, two-thirds of U.S./ Canadian food retailers added natural/organic items to their product offerings, and 65% of retailers enjoyed increased natural/organic dollar sales for the month of May 2011. Sales of foods/beverages in natural product stores reached $21.3 billion, up 7% in 2010. In conventional food, drug, and mass merchandisers, sales of natural/organic foods are $16.5 h, up 7.6% in 2010. Label claims declaring no chemical additives are very important to about half (47%) of food shoppers; no preservatives claims are attractive to more than one- third. Sales of foods/ drinks carrying a no preservatives claim topped $14.5 b in 2009, while sales of natural claims reached $22 b. Source


Elizabeth Sloan A.,Sunset Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2010

The need for product developers and marketers to differentiate their products to cater to distinctive attitudes and behaviors of mature consumers, baby boomers, and members of Gen X and Gen Y related to food is discussed. The dramatic differences in food preferences, eating styles, and attitudes/behaviors related to health, nutrition, safety, and greener living will force food corn- panics to more directly target flavors, foods, and food messages to different generations. The trend to preparing and eating more meals at home continues, especially among younger consumers, whose penchant for restaurant-style, gourmet, and natural foods will create a wealth of new product opportunities and force a reinvention of convenience foods. Scratch cooking, which is fast approaching levels not seen since 2004, increased most dramatically among younger meal preparers over the past five years, creating an enormous opportunity for more wholesome and highly flavored ingredients/basic meal components. Source


Sloan A.E.,Sunset Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2012

The article details America's changing eating patterns, preferences, and priorities in the present uncertain times. Consumer rituals around food, beverages, beauty, and health continue to center around the home. More than half of consumers serve more simple and less expensive meals at home, 55% eat out less often, and 42% bring snacks, foods, and/or drinks from home to work or school in order to save money. More than 11% of all adult eating today includes foods or beverages consumed within one hour of purchase, spurring convenience store and drug store food sales to new heights. When eating dinner alone, today's single consumers are also more likely to replace frozen meals with fresh, less processed alternatives. Moreover, these meals are likely to be more indulgent. At the same time, the American culinary movement is beginning to build momentum. About one-quarter of consumers are ordering more traditional, familiar flavors than they were ordering a year ago. Source


Elizabeth Sloan A.,Sunset Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2011

The consumer food products industry has witnessed significant growth of sales in the year 2010 and is expected to increase in the year 2011. Supermarkets continue to dominate consumer food spending with a 49% share of sales in 2010. Households with incomes of less than $35,000 are projected to represent nearly 40% of the US households by 2015. Low-income households are expected to deliver $115 billion in incremental consumer packaged goods (CPG) spending in future. Low-income shoppers are driving growth in fresh bread/rolls, yogurt, salty snacks, natural cheese, and cold cereal, among other sectors. Affluent ethnic households, which represent $110 billion in purchasing power, are another overlooked market segment. Sales of foods/drinks formulated without preservatives topped $14.5 billion in 2009, sales of products with a natural claim reached $22 billion. Consumers are moving toward products that are naturally high in vitamins/minerals and those that have been blended with other foods to create even higher nutrient levels. Source

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