Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd.

Seo gu, South Korea

Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd.

Seo gu, South Korea
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Mishra D.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Rhee Y.H.,Chungnam National University
Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2014

Biotechnological applications for metal recovery have played a greater role in recovery of valuable metals from low grade sulfide minerals from the beginning of the middle era till the end of the twentieth century. With depletion of ore/minerals and implementation of stricter environmental rules, microbiological applications for metal recovery have been shifted towards solid industrial wastes. Due to certain restrictions in conventional processes, use of microbes has garnered increased attention. The process is environmentally-friendly, economical and cost-effective. The major microorganisms in recovery of heavy metals are acidophiles that thrive at acidic pH ranging from 2.0-4.0. These microbes aid in dissolving metals by secreting inorganic and organic acids into aqueous media. Some of the well-known acidophilic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus spp. are well-studied for bioleaching activity, whereas, fungal species like Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus niger have been thoroughly studied for the same process. This mini-review focuses on the acidophilic microbial diversity and application of those microorganisms toward solid industrial wastes. © 2014 The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Kim H.-I.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Lee K.-W.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Mishra D.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Yi K.-M.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry | Year: 2015

Alamine-336, diluted with kerosene and iso-decanol, was used for separation of vanadium (IV) and molybdenum (VI) from leached solution generated by oxalic acid washing of spent residue hydrodesulfurization (RHDS) catalyst. The variation of aqueous pH represented that there was complete extraction of both vanadium (IV) and molybdenum (VI) at equilibrium pH 3.8. Both metals were extracted by two stages counter current process using 10% Alamine-336 along with 5% iso-decanol at organic to aqueous phase ratio 1:2. The metal loaded organic was then used for selective stripping of each metal. About 99% of vanadium (IV) and molybdenum (VI) was selectively stripped with 1.5. M sulfuric acid and 2. M ammonia solution, respectively. Both stripped solutions can be further processed for the preparation of respective oxide components of vanadium and molybdenum. © 2014.


Kim H.-I.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Lee K.-W.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Mishra D.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | Yi K.-M.,Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry | Year: 2014

Leached solution, generated by oxalic acid washing of spent residue hydrodesulfurization (RHDS) catalyst, was used for separation and recovery of vanadium. First of all, solvent extraction, using mixture of 20% (v/v) Alamine-336 and 5% (v/v) tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) as a phase modifier, was conducted to extract molybdenum completely at pH 0.50. Then molybdenum-free solution was used for vanadium extraction at pH 1.25 with 20% Alamine-336 and 5% TBP. Stripping of vanadium from loaded organic solution was performed with 1.5 M H2SO4 at O/A phase ratio of 5:1 where more than 99% of vanadium was stripped in two stages. The stripped vanadium solution was further processed by precipitating with ammonium hydroxide to recover ammonium-meta-vanadate which was calcined to obtain vanadium pentoxide. Finally a conceptual process was established for recovery of high purity vanadium pentoxide from oxalic acid leached solution of spent residue hydrodesulfurization (RHDS) catalyst. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Sungeel Hi Technology Ltd.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of microbiology (Seoul, Korea) | Year: 2014

Biotechnological applications for metal recovery have played a greater role in recovery of valuable metals from low grade sulfide minerals from the beginning of the middle era till the end of the twentieth century. With depletion of ore/minerals and implementation of stricter environmental rules, microbiological applications for metal recovery have been shifted towards solid industrial wastes. Due to certain restrictions in conventional processes, use of microbes has garnered increased attention. The process is environmentally-friendly, economical and cost-effective. The major microorganisms in recovery of heavy metals are acidophiles that thrive at acidic pH ranging from 2.0-4.0. These microbes aid in dissolving metals by secreting inorganic and organic acids into aqueous media. Some of the well-known acidophilic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus spp. are well-studied for bioleaching activity, whereas, fungal species like Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus niger have been thoroughly studied for the same process. This mini-review focuses on the acidophilic microbial diversity and application of those microorganisms toward solid industrial wastes.

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