Guangzhou, China

Sun Yat Sen University

www.sysu.edu.cn
Guangzhou, China

Sun Yat-sen University is a public university located in Guangdong, China. The university was founded in 1924 by Sun Yat-sen, a Chinese revolutionary and the first president and founding father of the Republic of China.The school's main campus, commonly referred to as the South Campus, is located in Haizhu District, Guangzhou, China, inheriting the campus of the former Lingnan University. Three of its four campuses are also located in Guangzhou, including the new East Campus in the Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, and the medically oriented North Campus. The school also has a new campus in Zhuhai, which is the largest among the four campuses. Consistently ranked among the top 10 universities in China, Sun Yat-sen University provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social science, natural science, technology, medical science, pharmacology and managerial science.The university's assets include the world's fastest supercomputer Tianhe-2, which is valued at 2.4 billion yuan . The university also has the largest affiliated hospital system in China. The university's Zhuhai Campus owns the largest teaching building in Asia measuring by acreage. Wikipedia.


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PubMed | Sun Yat Sen University
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

Macrophages play an important role in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, the spatial and temporal changes and the polarization of macrophages in murine laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) were investigated, and the polarized M1 and M2 biomarkers in the aqueous humors of neovascular AMD (nAMD) patients were studied. Macrophages, the main infiltrating inflammatory cells in CNV lesions, were evidenced by a significant increase in F4/80 mRNA expression and by the infiltration of F4/80+ cells in the lesions and the vicinity of laser-induced CNV. The mRNA expressions of M1-related markers were dramatically upregulated in the early stage, while the M2-related markers were slightly upregulated in the middle stage and sustained until the late stage. The results of immunostaining showed a similar early-but-transient M1 pattern and a delayed-but-sustained M2 pattern in laser-induced CNV. In addition, a higher M2/M1 ratio was found in both the murine models (Arg-1/iNOS and CCL22/CXCL10) and the aqueous humors of nAMD patients (CCL22/CXCL10) than in the controls. Our results suggested that the dynamic patterns of M1 and M2 were different in both the experimental and clinical CNV. The M2 macrophages were predominant and may play a more important role in the development of CNV.

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