Huguenot, NY, United States
Huguenot, NY, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Otranto D.,University of Bari | Johnson G.,Montana State University | Syvrud K.,Summit Research Labs | Yoon S.,Merial Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2016

Background: The studies reported here were conducted to assess the efficacy of ivermectin long-acting injection (IVM LAI; IVOMEC® GOLD, Merial; 3.15 % w/v ivermectin) for the treatment and control of natural infestations of cattle by Hypoderma bovis and Hypoderma lineatum, which are the most economically important oestrid flies of cattle in the northern hemisphere. Methods: Cattle selected from herds with a history of Hypoderma infestation were grouped into blocks of three (Italy, 33 cattle; Germany, 30 cattle) or two (USA, 16 cattle) animals each, on the basis of positivity at the pre-treatment anti-Hypoderma antibody titres. Within each block, animals were randomly allocated to one of the following treatment regimens: saline (control); IVM LAI, administered at the predicted time of occurrence of first-instar larvae (Italy, Germany, USA); IVM LAI, administered at the predicted time of occurrence of second- and/or third-instar larvae (Italy, Germany). All treatments were administered by subcutaneous injection in correspondence of the area anterior to the shoulder at 1 ml/50 kg body weight, which corresponds to 630 mcg IVM/kg for IVM LAI. Results: No Hypoderma larvae emerged from animals treated with IVM LAI, whereas live H. lineatum (Italy) or H. bovis (Germany, USA) larvae were collected from saline-treated animals (P < 0.01). No adverse reactions to treatments were in any of the animals enrolled in the study. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate that ivermectin in a long-acting formulation is 100 % efficacious in the treatment of cattle naturally infested by H. bovis and H. lineatum larvae at all stages of development. IVM LAI can, therefore, be used as 'prophylactic' treatment for Hypoderma spp. infestations in absence of external evidence of their presence and thus prior to skin and carcass damage, and as 'therapeutic' treatment, when warbles are already present. © 2016 The Author(s).


Bowen R.A.,Colorado State University | Bosco-Lauth A.,Colorado State University | Syvrud K.,Summit Research Labs | Thomas A.,Zoetis Inc. | And 5 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2014

Over the last years West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 has spread from the African to the European continent. This study was conducted to demonstrate efficacy of an inactivated, lineage 1-based, WNV vaccine (Equip® WNV) against intrathecal challenge of horses with a recent isolate of lineage 2 WNV. Twenty horses, sero-negative for WNV, were enrolled and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups: an unvaccinated control group (T01, n=10) and a group administered with Equip® WNV (T02, n=10). Horses were vaccinated at Day 0 and 21 and were challenged at day 42 with WNV lineage 2, Nea Santa/Greece/2010. Personnel performing clinical observations were blinded to treatment allocation. Sixty percent of the controls had to be euthanized after challenge compared to none of the vaccinates. A significantly lower percentage of the vaccinated animals showed clinical disease (two different clinical observations present on the same day) on six different days of study and the percentage of days with clinical disease was significantly lower in the vaccinated group. A total of 80% of the non-vaccinated horses showed viremia while only one vaccinated animal was positive by virus isolation on a single occasion. Vaccinated animals started to develop antibodies against WNV lineage 2 from day 14 (2 weeks after the first vaccination) and at day 42 (the time of onset of immunity) they had all developed a strong antibody response. Histopathology scores for all unvaccinated animals ranged from mild to very severe in each of the tissues examined (cervical spinal cord, medulla and pons), whereas in vaccinated horses 8 of 10 animals had no lesions and 2 had minimal lesions in one tissue. In conclusion, Equip® WNV significantly reduced the number of viremic horses, the duration and severity of clinical signs of disease and mortality following challenge with lineage 2 WNV. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Zoetis Inc., Summit Research Labs and Colorado State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Vaccine | Year: 2014

Over the last years West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 has spread from the African to the European continent. This study was conducted to demonstrate efficacy of an inactivated, lineage 1-based, WNV vaccine (Equip WNV) against intrathecal challenge of horses with a recent isolate of lineage 2 WNV. Twenty horses, sero-negative for WNV, were enrolled and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups: an unvaccinated control group (T01, n=10) and a group administered with Equip WNV (T02, n=10). Horses were vaccinated at Day 0 and 21 and were challenged at day 42 with WNV lineage 2, Nea Santa/Greece/2010. Personnel performing clinical observations were blinded to treatment allocation. Sixty percent of the controls had to be euthanized after challenge compared to none of the vaccinates. A significantly lower percentage of the vaccinated animals showed clinical disease (two different clinical observations present on the same day) on six different days of study and the percentage of days with clinical disease was significantly lower in the vaccinated group. A total of 80% of the non-vaccinated horses showed viremia while only one vaccinated animal was positive by virus isolation on a single occasion. Vaccinated animals started to develop antibodies against WNV lineage 2 from day 14 (2 weeks after the first vaccination) and at day 42 (the time of onset of immunity) they had all developed a strong antibody response. Histopathology scores for all unvaccinated animals ranged from mild to very severe in each of the tissues examined (cervical spinal cord, medulla and pons), whereas in vaccinated horses 8 of 10 animals had no lesions and 2 had minimal lesions in one tissue. In conclusion, Equip WNV significantly reduced the number of viremic horses, the duration and severity of clinical signs of disease and mortality following challenge with lineage 2 WNV.


Cunliffe J.M.,Summit Research Labs | Shen J.X.,Summit Research Labs | Wei X.,Summit Research Labs | Dreyer D.P.,Summit Research Labs | And 2 more authors.
Bioanalysis | Year: 2011

Background: The fast-paced nature of the pharmaceutical industry requires robust bioanalytical methods to endure the high-throughput sample demands of the production environment. Results: A rapid, accurate and precise LC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantitation of a diastereomer quartet in human plasma. Virtually all of the phosphatidylcholine and most of the lysophosphatidylcholine from human plasma were removed using a phospholipid-removing protein precipitation 96-well plate. An Agilent Poroshell SB-C18 2.1 ×-50 mm superficially porous column was used at 100°C and 1.2 ml/min to separate a diastereomer quartet in <2.5 min. Peak shape, retention and resolution were maintained over nearly 200 extracted bioanalytical samples under these separation conditions. The method was tested for accuracy and precision; the assay inter-run accuracy and precision were minus 7.2-0.7% and 2.1-11.9%, respectively (n = 18). Conclusion: The application of the superficially porous column resulted in twofold response increase and a 2.6-fold reduction in cycle time compared with a 3.5-μm column performing under comparable resolution conditions. © 2011 Future Science Ltd.


Shah S.A.,Summit Research Labs | Dickens C.J.,Bespak Europe | Ward D.J.,Bespak Europe | Banaszek A.A.,Bespak Europe | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery | Year: 2014

Background: Previous studies showed nasal spray in vitro tests cannot predict in vivo deposition, pharmacokinetics, or pharmacodynamics. This challenge makes it difficult to assess deposition achieved with new technologies delivering to the therapeutically beneficial posterior nasal cavity. In this study, we determined best parameters for using a regionally divided nasal cast to predict deposition. Our study used a model suspension and a design of experiments to produce repeatable deposition results that mimic nasal deposition patterns of nasal suspensions from the literature. Methods: The seven-section (the nozzle locator, nasal vestibule, front turbinate, rear turbinate, olfactory region, nasopharynx, and throat filter) nylon nasal cast was based on computed tomography images of healthy humans. It was coated with a glycerol/Brij-35 solution to mimic mucus. After assembling and orienting, airflow was applied and nasal spray containing a model suspension was sprayed. After disassembling the cast, drug depositing in each section was assayed by HPLC. The success criteria for optimal settings were based on nine in vivo studies in the literature. The design of experiments included exploratory and half factorial screening experiments to identify variables affecting deposition (angles, airflow, and airflow time), optimization experiments, and then repeatability and reproducibility experiments. Results: We found tilt angle and airflow time after actuation affected deposition the most. The optimized settings were flow rate of 16 L/min, postactuation flow time of 12 sec, a tilt angle of 23 , nozzle angles of 0 , and actuation speed of 5 cm/sec. Neither cast nor operator caused significant variation of results. Conclusion: We determined cast parameters to produce results resembling suspension nasal sprays in the literature. The results were repeatable and unaffected by operator or cast. These nasal spray parameters could be used to assess deposition from new devices or formulations. For human deposition studies using radiolabeled formulations, this cast could show that radiolabel deposition represents drug deposition. Our methods could also be used to optimize settings for other casts. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Summit Research Labs
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioanalysis | Year: 2011

The fast-paced nature of the pharmaceutical industry requires robust bioanalytical methods to endure the high-throughput sample demands of the production environment.A rapid, accurate and precise LC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantitation of a diastereomer quartet in human plasma. Virtually all of the phosphatidylcholine and most of the lysophosphatidylcholine from human plasma were removed using a phospholipid-removing protein precipitation 96-well plate. An Agilent Poroshell SB-C18 2.1 50 mm superficially porous column was used at 100C and 1.2 ml/min to separate a diastereomer quartet in <2.5 min. Peak shape, retention and resolution were maintained over nearly 200 extracted bioanalytical samples under these separation conditions. The method was tested for accuracy and precision; the assay inter-run accuracy and precision were minus 7.2-0.7% and 2.1-11.9%, respectively (n = 18).The application of the superficially porous column resulted in twofold response increase and a 2.6-fold reduction in cycle time compared with a 3.5-m column performing under comparable resolution conditions.


Patent
Summit Research Labs | Date: 2010-02-22

The present invention describes a method and compositions by which introducing PO_(4)^(3 )ion at particular stage in the preparation of aluminum/zirconium solutions surprisingly results in significantly improved zirconium molecular weight stability.


Summit Research Labs | Entity website

OurResources SummitReheis is pleased to provide the following links to a variety of trade and professional associations for the antiperspirants, deodorants and cosmetics industry. We invite you to visit these sites for additional information and resources


Summit Research Labs | Entity website

Contact We are proud to serve you with a reliable supply of the highest-quality products available. Contact us for more information about our antiperspirant actives for antiperspirant sticks, roll-ons, clear gels, aerosols, creams, soft solids, wipes, pump sprays, and foot sprays

Loading Summit Research Labs collaborators
Loading Summit Research Labs collaborators