Sunnyvale, CA, United States
Sunnyvale, CA, United States

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Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2010-12-17

In one embodiment the present invention includes a system and method of charging a battery using a switching regulator. In one embodiment, a switching regulator receives an input voltage and input current. The output of the switching regulator is coupled to a battery to be charged. The switching regulator provides a current into the battery that is larger than the current into the switching regulator. As the voltage on the battery increases, the current provided by the switching regulator is reduced. The present invention may be implemented using either analog or digital techniques for reducing the current into the battery as the battery voltage increases.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2011-08-16

Embodiments of the present invention include systems and methods of controlling power in battery operated systems. In one embodiment, the present invention includes a switching regulator for boosting voltage on a depleted battery to power up a system. The system may communicate with an external system to increase the current received from the external system. Embodiments of the present invention include circuits for controlling power received from external power sources such as a USB power source. In another embodiment, input-output control techniques are disclosed for controlling the delivery of power to a system or charging a system battery, or both, from an external power source.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2010-08-25

Embodiments of the present invention include charge pump circuits and methods. In one embodiment, a first charge pump receives a voltage and generates a first charge pump output voltage and current for supplying the power requirements of a circuit. A second charge pump is coupled in series with the first charge pump. The second charge pump generates a second charge pump output voltage and current for supplying different power requirements of the circuit. In one embodiment, the first charge pump provides a high current low voltage output to a first circuit and the second charge pump provides a low current high voltage output to a second circuit. Capacitors of the first charge pump may be external to an integrated circuit and capacitors of the second charge pump may be internal to the integrated circuit.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2010-11-15

Embodiments of the present invention include circuits and methods for sensing resistance. In one embodiment, a current is generated into a node. The node is coupled to a first terminal of a resistor. A second terminal of the resistor is coupled in series with a capacitance and a reference voltage. The current is turned off when a voltage on the node meets a threshold. A second voltage is detected on the node after the current is turned off. A resistance value is determined based on the first voltage on the node and the second voltage on the node. In one embodiment, the resistor is external to an integrated circuit and sensed through a single pin of the integrated circuit. The integrated circuit may include a current source, comparator, and a digital-to-analog converter.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2012-07-23

A switching regulator circuit includes a power stage and a compensation network. The compensation network includes a programmable transconductance (g_(m)), having a first selectable transconductance such a closed loop transfer function of the switching regulator circuit may be characterized by a first transfer function having a having a first DC open loop gain and a first bandwidth, and by a second transfer function having a second DC open loop gain and a second bandwidth.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2012-05-11

In one embodiment the present invention includes a system and method of charging a battery using a switching regulator. In one embodiment, a switching regulator receives an input voltage and input current. The output of the switching regulator is coupled to a battery to be charged. The switching regulator provides a current into the battery that is larger than the current into the switching regulator. As the voltage on the battery increases, the current provided by the switching regulator is reduced. The present invention may be implemented using either analog or digital techniques for reducing the current into the battery as the battery voltage increases.


Patent
Summit Microelectronics | Date: 2012-08-01

Embodiments of the present invention include charge pump circuits and methods. In one embodiment, a first charge pump receives a voltage and generates a first charge pump output voltage and current for supplying the power requirements of a circuit. A second charge pump is coupled in series with the first charge pump. The second charge pump generates a second charge pump output voltage and current for supplying different power requirements of the circuit. In one embodiment, the first charge pump provides a high current low voltage output to a first circuit and the second charge pump provides a low current high voltage output to a second circuit. Capacitors of the first charge pump may be external to an integrated circuit and capacitors of the second charge pump may be internal to the integrated circuit.


News Article | February 15, 2013
Site: tech.firstpost.com

Qualcomm has revealed that its latest chipset, which is already in use in 70 smartphones and tablets, includes a new technology called Quick Charge 1.0. The technology allows batteries to charge much faster than otherwise possible. The chipset maker states that a smartphone battery might take more than four hours to charge fully under normal circumstances. However, thanks to Quick Charge, the same battery can be charged up to 40 percent faster. Already, USB 3.0 ports on PCs allow phones to charge faster, but it is surprising that Qualcomm had kept such a feature under wraps till now. The phones that have the Quick Charge feature have been available in the market for many months. “A phone with Qualcomm Quick Charge 1.0 can charge up to 40% faster than older phones. A phone without Quick Charge 1.0 could be stuck plugged in charging for more than four hours. With Quick Charge 1.0, the same phone can reach its full charge in three hours or less. The less time you spend charging your mobile device, the more time you get to use it; your mobile device becomes truly mobile,” Qualcomm revealed in an official blog post. The post further said, “Quick Charge 1.0 is offered to our customers as an integrated solution (as part of the PMIC, or power management integrated circuit) and a standalone solution that interfaces to the USB connector.  Any phone or tablet’s charging port can be enabled with Quick Charge.” According to the blog, Qualcomm acquired this technology when it bought over Summit Microelectronics in June 2012. According to a press release issued at the time, the company entered this decision to meet “the demand for more sophisticated battery management”. “Summit Microelectronics is a leader in providing flexible, highly integrated power management solutions combining precision power regulation with sophisticated digital control in a single chip. In particular, the company’s fast charging solutions are found in a variety of leading mobile phones, tablets, and e-readers,” the press release said. The company also released a list of devices which have Qualcomm Quick Charge 1.0 support. The list includes high-end devices like the HTC Butterfly, HTC One S, LG Optimus G, Nexus 4, Motorola’s Droid RAZR HD, Droid RAZR M and Droid RAZR Maxx HD; Samsung’s Galaxy S III (US version), Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 (LTE), Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (LTE) and Sony’s Xperia T and Xperia V phones.


News Article | January 29, 2013
Site: www.techweekeurope.co.uk

Venture fund to invest in high potential mobile startups in US, Asia and Europe Nokia has announced that it is going to invest $250 million into its investment arm for technology start-ups, Nokia Growth Partners (NGP). It will be the third venture fund for NGP, which currently has $600 million under its management. The arm invests in mobile hardware and component companies as well as digital advertising startups. “Over the past decade, Nokia has developed an innovative venturing strategy,” said Timo Ihamuotila, Nokia executive vice president & chief financial officer. “Our ongoing commitment to Nokia Growth Partners reinforces Nokia’s support for a vibrant mobile ecosystem and our determination to collaborate with industry innovators to build great mobile products.” Nokia says that the funds will be used to invest in “high potential businesses within the mobile ecoysytems in the US, Europe and Asia. NGP has previously invested in Quickr, Rocketfuel, SponsorPay and gesture input software maker Swype. “Nokia Growth Partners is delighted with Nokia’s continuing commitment, which recognizes strong financial performance since our formation in 2005,” said John Gardner, managing partner of Nokia Growth Partners. “What sets NGP apart from pure financial investors are the partnerships and insights our invested companies get from their close association with Nokia.” “In the past year, NGP has also realized several successful exits, including the IPOs of Morpho and Inside Secure and sales of Swype, Summit Microelectronics and Netmagic,” he continued. “We are excited about our existing strong portfolio of companies and their potential impact globally.” Nokia made a profit of €202 million during the fourth quarter of 2012, but for the first time in 20 years it has no plans to pay a dividend. Last year, Nokia paid out €0.20 per share, but the decision not to offer investors a return this year could be seen as part of a wider cost-cutting programme that has seen job losses and the offload of several assets such as its Vertu luxury phone subsidiary. What do you know about Nokia? Find out with our quiz!


News Article | June 4, 2014
Site: gigaom.com

New NTT Docomo’s smartphone users soon notice that it takes a lot less time for their devices’ battery meters to reach full charge. Japan’s Docomo will  be one of the first carriers to sell phone chargers using Qualcomm’s new Quick Charge 2.0 technology, which will reduce the time to fill up a phone battery up to 75 percent faster. The technology needs to be both in the phone as well as the power adapter to work, though 2.0-capable phones will still connect chargers using older Quick Charge technologies. Qualcomm has been taking care of the phone side of the equation by embedding Quick Charge across its line of smartphone processors (Snapdragon 400, 600 and 800 chips), and it’s also been offering the technology as a stand-alone integrated circuit design for phone makers. The HTC One M8 and Samsung Galaxy S5 are among the first devices to support Quick Charge 2.0. The phone or tablet tells the adapter’s power management chip to deliver more power to the device, charging it more quickly. Standard chargers run at 5 volts, while Quick Charge 2.0 can run at 6, 9, and 12 volts. So to fully charge a 3300mAh battery, a standard charger would take 270 minutes, while a charger with Quick Charge 2.0 could take as little as 96 minutes. Starting this summer, Qualcomm will begin selling Quick Charge power adapters as well as complement of smartphones and tablets capable of using them, though neither Qualcomm nor NTT Docomo named any specific models. Qualcomm launched Quick Charge 1.0 in 2012 after it bought power-optimization startup Summit Microelectronics. Though the technology, which improved charge times by 40 percent, made it into many Andorid and Windows phones, Qualcomm quickly jumped to its second iteration, partnering with Power Integrations to develop the power adapter’s variable voltage capabilities and boosting the maximum power delivered to the device from 10 watts to 60 watts. The increased wattage is designed not just to make smartphone adapter more efficient, but also larger devices like smaller notebook computers.

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