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Robert Lee, LA, United States

Van Den Berg A.K.,University of Vermont | Perkins T.D.,University of Vermont | Isselhardt M.L.,University of Vermont | Godshall M.A.,Sugar Processing Research Institute Inc. | Lloyd S.W.,Agriculture Research Seervice
International Sugar Journal | Year: 2011

Maple syrup is produced and marketed as a specialty, 'natural' sweetener with highly desirable properties, particularly its unique flavor and aroma profile. Pre-concentration of maple sap by membrane separation is used to increase the efficiency and profitability of maple production by reducing the time and fuel necessary to concentrate sap to maple syrup density using only the traditional method of thermal evaporation in open-pan style evaporators. However, there is some concern that producing syrup from sap concentrated by membrane processes to higher than previously standard concentration levels (5-8%) might yield negative impacts on the properties of maple syrup by reducing the length of time sap is processed with heat, which generates the majority of color, flavor, and aroma compounds. To investigate this question, experiments were conducted in which maple syrup was produced simultaneously from concentrated and reconstituted maple sap at four levels of sugar concentration, 2, 8, 12, and 15%. The chemical composition and flavor of the syrups produced were subsequently analyzed and evaluated. Maple syrup produced from more concentrated sap material was lighter in color, had a higher pH, and contained smaller quantities of invert sugar and volatile flavor compounds than syrup produced simultaneously with less concentrated sap material. However, differences observed in chemical composition were numerically small and not likely of practical significance. In addition, panelists in sensory evaluation experiments were unable to detect overall differences in the flavor of syrup produced simultaneously from sap material at 2 and 15% sugarconcentration. The results indicate that chemical composition and flavor do not differ significantly in maple syrup produced from sap material of different sugar concentrations, and thus that producing syrup from sap concentrated by membrane separation to higher sugar concentration levels (up to 15%) is an acceptable method maple producers can use to increase the profitability of maple syrup production. Source


Godshall M.A.,Sugar Processing Research Institute Inc.
ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts | Year: 2010

Sugar production, from both beet and cane, is energy and water-intensive. In today's social and political environment, industries strive to be environmentally sustainable and green, while maintaining profitability. The sugar industry has three avenues for achieving these goals: improving the over-all efficiency of the process; expanding its market with a range of innovative edible products; and finally, entering into the 21st century's bio-based economy by developing products to replace petrochemical-derived products. The industry has done well with the first two of these, but has found barriers to exploiting the latter possibility. This presentation reviews some of the industry successes with value-added products and the potential for further development in the area of bio-based products. Source


Van Den Berg A.K.,University of Vermont | Perkins T.D.,University of Vermont | Isselhardt M.L.,University of Vermont | Godshall M.-A.,Sugar Processing Research Institute Inc. | Lloyd S.W.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
International Sugar Journal | Year: 2012

Concentration of maple sap by membrane separation to greater than 20 °Brix prior to thermal evaporation could significantly increase the profitability of maple syrup production by reducing fuel costs and increasing the yield of high-value, light-colored syrup. However the effects of this practice on the overall quality of maple syrup, particularly on the unique flavor characteristics which underlie this sweetener's high economic value, are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine if the chemical composition and flavor of syrup produced from sap concentrated to 21.5 °Brix differed significantly from those of syrup produced from the same sap concentrated to 8 °Brix, the level currently utilized by maple producers. Maple syrup produced from sap concentrated to 21.5 °Brix was significantly lighter in color than syrup produced simultaneously from the same sap concentrated to 8 °Brix (p < 0.02). However, there were no other significant differences observed in the properties, composition, or perceived flavor of the two types of syrup. The results indicate that producing syrup with sap concentrated to 21.5 °Brix does not significantly impact syrup quality, and thus that this is an acceptable practice producers can use to increase the profitability of maple syrup production. Source

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