Fort Pierce, FL, United States
Fort Pierce, FL, United States

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PubMed | University of Florida and Subtropical Insects Research Unit
Type: | Journal: BMC genomics | Year: 2015

Multipartite mitochondrial genomes are very rare in animals but have been found previously in two insect orders with highly rearranged genomes, the Phthiraptera (parasitic lice), and the Psocoptera (booklice/barklice).We provide the first report of a multipartite mitochondrial genome architecture in a third order with highly rearranged genomes: Thysanoptera (thrips). We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of two divergent members of the Scirtothrips dorsalis cryptic species complex. The East Asia 1 species has the single circular chromosome common to animals while the South Asia 1 species has a genome consisting of two circular chromosomes. The fragmented South Asia 1 genome exhibits extreme chromosome size asymmetry with the majority of genes on the large, 14.28 kb, chromosome and only nad6 and trnC on the 0.92 kb mini-circle chromosome. This genome also features paralogous control regions with high similarity suggesting a very recent origin of the nad6 mini-circle chromosome in the South Asia 1 cryptic species.Thysanoptera, along with the other minor paraenopteran insect orders should be considered models for rapid mitochondrial genome evolution, including fragmentation. Continued use of these models will facilitate a greater understanding of recombination and other mitochondrial genome evolutionary processes across eukaryotes.


Walter A.J.,Subtropical Insects Research Unit | Hall D.G.,Subtropical Insects Research Unit | Duan Y.P.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Plant Disease | Year: 2012

Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is the prevalent species of three HLB-associated Liberibacter spp., which is vectored by the psyllid Diaphorina citri. The vector and the bacteria have host plants outside the genus Citrus, and these plants have the potential to affect disease epidemiology within citrus groves. Murraya paniculata could be especially problematic because it is a popular ornamental plant and a host of both psyllid and bacteria. We conducted a year-long survey of eight urban plantings of M. paniculata in east-central Florida to characterize 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection rates in plants and associated psyllids. Using sensitive quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers targeting two prophage genes of 'Ca. L. asiaticus', we found infection to be extremely low: less than 1% of psyllids and 1.8% of plants. With qPCR primers targeting 'Ca. L. asiaticus' 16S rDNA, none of the plants and only one psyllid were 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive. Therefore, the titer of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is low in M. paniculata and associated psyllids. These results suggest that urban plantings of M. paniculata may serve as a minor source of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' inoculum. © 2012 The American Phytopathological Society.

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