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Han B.,Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration | Compton W.M.,U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse | Jones C.M.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Cai R.,Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2015

IMPORTANCE: Since 1999, the United States has experienced increases in morbidity and mortality associated with nonmedical use of prescription opioids. OBJECTIVE: To assess national trends in and characteristics of nonmedical prescription opioid use and use disorders and the national trend in related mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prevalence of nonmedical use and use disorders and related risk factors were based on data from 472 200 persons aged 18 through 64 years who participated in the 2003-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Mortality was based on the 2003-2013 National Vital Statistics System's Multiple Cause of Death Files. EXPOSURES: Prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioids. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Nonmedical prescription opioid use and use disorders. RESULTS: Among adults aged 18 through 64 years, the prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased from 5.4% (95% CI, 5.08%-5.70%) in 2003 to 4.9% (95% CI, 4.58%-5.22%) in 2013 (absolute difference, -0.5%; 95% CI, -0.11% to -0.89%), but the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorders increased from 0.6% (95% CI, 0.54%-0.76%) in 2003 to 0.9% (95% CI, 0.75%-1.01%) in 2013 (absolute difference, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.03%-0.43%). The 12-month prevalence of high-frequency use (>200 days) also increased from 0.3% (95% CI, 0.19%-0.35%) in 2003 to 0.4% (95% CI, 0.31%-0.48%) in 2013 (absolute difference, 0.1%; 95% CI, 0.01%-0.29%). Mortality assessed by drug overdose death rates involving prescription opioids increased from 4.5 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.42-4.61) in 2003 to 7.8 per 100 000 (95% CI, 7.64-7.89) in 2013 (absolute difference, 3.3; 95% CI, 3.09-3.41) among adults aged 18 through 64 years. The mean number of days of nonmedical use of prescription opioids increased from 2.1 (95% CI, 1.83-2.37) in 2003 to 2.6 (95% CI, 2.27-2.85) in 2013 (absolute difference, 0.5, 95% CI, 0.05-0.86). The model-adjusted prevalence of having prescription opioid use disorders among nonmedical users increased to 15.7% (95% CI, 13.87%-1767%) in 2010,16.1% (95% CI, 14.36%-1799%) in 2011,17.0% (95% CI, 15.07%-19.12%) in 2012, and 16.9% (95% CI, 14.95%-19.03%) in 2013 from 12.7% (95% CI, 11.04%-14.53%) in 2003. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: During the 2003-2013 years, among adults aged 18 through 64 years, the percentage of nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased. In contrast, the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorders, frequency of use, and related mortality increased. Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Each year, APNA and other health care organizations highlight training opportunities and educational offerings which focus on military populations in honor of Joining Forces Wellness Week. Joining Forces is First Lady Michelle Obama’s national initiative which aims to ensure that service members, veterans, and their families receive needed support and treatment as they reconnect with their communities, particularly when it comes to employment, education, and wellness. This year, APNA is proud to highlight several initiatives which speak to current mental health care needs of military populations, including military psychiatry, opioid use disorders, suicide prevention, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury. “Because we are the largest segment of the health care workforce, nurses have numerous opportunities to make a positive impact on the long-term wellness of hundreds of thousands of Service Members, Veterans, and their families,” says APNA President Kris A. McLoughlin, DNP, APRN, PMH-CNS, BC, CADC-II, FAAN. “An understanding of their unique mental health needs is vitally important. I encourage nurses from across settings to expand their understanding by taking advantage of APNA’s educational opportunities and resources.” According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), while approximately half of returning service members who need mental health treatment seek it, only just above 50% of them receive adequate care. (1) America’s nurses are trusted partners in providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care in nearly every community and every setting where health care is delivered. Psychiatric-mental health nurses in particular are uniquely equipped to provide holistic care to persons with mental health and/or substance use needs. With an understanding of the culture and behavioral health needs of service members, veterans, and their families, nurses can help ensure that those who need mental health and/or substance use disorder treatment seek it, and that when they do, the care they receive is effective. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association is offering education and resources to help nurses understand the following mental health needs of those who have served in the Military and their families: Unique Aspects of Military Mental Health In the podcast, Military Psychiatry: Practice and Pitfalls for Civilian Providers, presenter Joseph Holshoe, MSN, PMHNP-BC uses his experience as a Navy officer and now US Public Health service officer to describe the unique aspects of military medicine. This session provides nurses with basic understanding of military medicine and the unique mental health needs of the military population. For example, medications and diagnoses that can prevent enlistment or deployment to how common psychiatric diagnoses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) present in military populations. This online continuing nursing education podcast is available for free November 7-11 in honor of Joining Forces Wellness week. Prevalence of Opioid Use Disorders Combat-related injuries and physical strains associated with deployment mean that chronic pain and opioid use are prevalent amongst military service members. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, abuse of prescription drugs is higher among service members than civilians, and most of the prescription drugs misused by service members are opioids. (2) Three free webinars from APNA provide nurses with knowledge and skills to provide interventions for opioid use disorders and promote effective treatment to those who need it. Death by Suicide Twenty US veterans commit suicide each day according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (3), yet death by suicide is believed to be mostly preventable if the person at risk receives proper screening, identification, and prompt intervention from competent mental health professionals. The APNA Competency Based Training for Suicide Prevention, the first of its kind for psychiatric-mental health nurse generalists, is a full day workshop which educates nurses on how to integrate these skills into their practice in order to prevent suicide. More information about the workshop can be found at http://www.apna.org/suicide-prevention-training. Additional Resources for Providers In addition, free resources gathered with an eye to the needs of psychiatric-mental health nurses who provide care to military populations are available at http://www.apna.org/Military. Fact sheets, toolkits, and more provide guidelines and important considerations for providers. This online resource center includes extensive sections dedicated to the topics of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The American Psychiatric Nurses Association is a national professional membership organization committed to the specialty practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing and wellness promotion, prevention of mental health problems and the care and treatment of persons with psychiatric disorders. APNA’s membership is inclusive of all psychiatric mental health registered nurses including associate degree, baccalaureate, advanced practice (comprised of clinical nurse specialists and psychiatric nurse practitioners), and nurse scientists and academicians (PhD). APNA serves as a resource for psychiatric mental health nurses to engage in networking, education, and the dissemination of research. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. 1.Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (September 29, 2014). Veterans and military families. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/veterans-military-families 2. National Institute on Drug Abuse (March 2013). Drug Facts – Substance Abuse in the Military. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/substance-abuse-in-military 3. Veterans Administration Suicide Prevention Program (July 2016). Facts about veteran suicide. Retrieved from http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/Suicide_Prevention_FactSheet_New_VA_Stats_070616_1400.pdf


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

ATLANTA, Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- DLH Holdings Corp. (NASDAQ:DLHC) (“DLH” or the “Company”), a leading provider of innovative healthcare services and solutions to Federal agencies, today announced it has been awarded the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) multiple award, Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ), performance-based contract. SAMHSA is an operating division within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and is charged with reducing the impact of substance use disorders and mental illness on America’s communities.  As a prime contractor, DLH will provide SAMHSA officials with support services to help achieve administration goals within the areas of policy analysis, program management support, and statistical projects.  "Winning this award means a lot to us.  I am proud that we have been able to leverage our strengths in behavioral health, big data and health informatics to be in position to help SAMHSA with this vital area challenging our nation," said DLH President of Mission Services and Solutions Helene Fisher. “We look forward to working with them to deliver transformative services that will advance behavioral health within our communities.” The company will be able to compete for task orders for up to a five-year period, further establishing the firm as a top provider of health technology-enabled business process outsourcing and program management solutions in support of large-scale federal health and human services initiatives. About DLH DLH (NASDAQ:DLHC) serves clients throughout the United States as a healthcare and human services provider to the Federal Government. The company’s core competencies include assessment and compliance monitoring, business process outsourcing, health information technology systems integration and management, readiness and medical logistics, and pharmacy solutions. DLH has more than 1,400 employees working throughout the country. For more information, visit the corporate website at www.dlhcorp.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The face of drug addiction in America is not a homeless man in an alley, begging for change for his next fix. The word “heroin” may still conjure images of these stereotypes in the minds of many, but the opiate addiction epidemic overwhelming every region in the United States is changing this narrative. Today’s opiate addict can be a child, next-door neighbor, coworker, or even best friend. Addiction has become a painful reality for people from every walk of life within the past decade. Since 1999, the number of opiate prescriptions in the country has quadrupled. When overdoses and deaths rose as a result of prescription pill abuse, regulations on these pills got stricter- but the beast of addiction had been awoken in millions of users. Prescription pill addicts turned to heroin, which is chemically similar to synthetic opiates commonly prescribed by doctors, but cheaper, more powerful, and oftentimes easier to obtain. Between 2000 and 2015, nearly half a million Americans died due to a drug overdose. More than sixty percent of those overdoses were due to a prescription or illicit opiate. Since the early 2000s, deaths rates from opiates have steadily increased, and according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 78 Americans die every day from overdosing on these drugs. This epidemic has hit the Midwest and the Northeast especially hard, but no one is immune from the tragedy of opiate addiction. News publications across the country have begun to detail the lives of overdose victims, profiling lawyers, teenagers, grandmothers, police officers, military veterans, and teachers who have fatally succumbed to substance use disorder in the form of pills and powders. This loss of life on a national scale robs our communities and families of the potential intrinsic in every human being who is affected by addiction. No longer can society turn a blind eye to this trend. Our parents, children, and loved ones are besieged by the brain disorder that causes the addictive use of substances and the grim consequences it yields. Addiction- specifically opiate addiction- is the defining health crisis of modern America. Most treatment centers do their best to help addicts and alcoholics, but few can guarantee results. Unfortunately, many substance users end up in a vicious cycle of rehab followed by relapse, and treatment recidivism rates are skyrocketing as a result. Wellness Retreat Recovery Center is a luxury drug and alcohol addiction treatment center located in San Jose, and they’re doing something that is virtually unheard of in the rehab industry. In addition to offering traditional and holistic therapy, Wellness Retreat Recovery boasts a “treatment guarantee” that is rarely offered by facilities both reputable and obscure. This treatment guarantee is offered to every client at Wellness, and it stipulates that clients who complete the facility’s program and follow all clinical and aftercare recommendations are guaranteed to remain sober for a year after treatment. This is especially significant because studies show that patients who maintain a full year of abstinence from substances have exponentially better chances of maintaining recovery in the long term. Patients who meet these requirements and relapse within a year of completing treatment are offered 30 days of free treatment if they decide to return to Wellness for help. This unprecedented offer is unique because treatment is costly, and few centers are confident enough in their services that they can guarantee success. Wellness Retreat Recovery is different- this treatment guarantee functions as an endorsement of high quality care and a promise that clients will have access to the most cutting-edge and effective therapy available on the market. In a world mired in the dark abyss of opiate addiction, it’s a beacon of hope: recovery is possible. Guaranteed. "Preventing Heroin Use: Facts, Factors, and Strategies ." SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (2015): 1-11. SAMHSA. Web. 20 Jan. 2017. Rudd, Rose A., MSPH, Puja Seth, PhD, Felicita David, MS, and Lawrence Scholl, PhD. "Increases in Drug and Opioid-Involved Overdose Deaths — United States, 2010–2015." Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) 65.50-51 (2016): 1445-452. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. Web. 20 Jan. 2017.


SAN CLEMENTE, CA--(Marketwired - February 21, 2017) - Telehealthcare, Inc. ("Telehealthcare.com") ( : TLLT) The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published final rule changes to Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records regulations, (42 CFR Part 2) to be effective February 17, 2017. "The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is issuing this final rule to update and modernize the Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records regulations and facilitate information exchange within new health care models while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns of patients seeking treatment for a substance use disorder. These modifications also help clarify the regulations and reduce unnecessary burden. The laws and regulations governing the confidentiality of substance use disorder records were written out of great concern about the potential use of substance use disorder information against individuals, causing individuals with substance use disorders not to seek needed treatment." Source: Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records. A Rule by the Health and Human Services Department on 01/18/2017 https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/01/18/2017-00719/confidentiality-of-substance-use-disorder-patient-records According to a recent press release from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): "Today's changes will further enhance health services research, integrated treatment, quality assurance and health information exchange activities while at the same time safeguarding the essential privacy rights of people seeking treatment for substance use disorders," said HHS Deputy Assistant Secretary, Kana Enomoto. "These efforts clear the way for integrated health care models that can provide a better, more cost-effective health care system that also empowers people to make key decisions about their health care." Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2017). New rule improves the exchange of medical information in ways that protect the privacy of people receiving substance use treatment. https://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201701131200 In a statement from Derek Cahill, CEO of Telehealthcare, Inc., "We are very encouraged by this ruling and its anticipated impact for our CarePanda secured messaging application. With the implementation of these rulings, we believe CarePanda will be the go-to application for Substance Abuse Centers who will need to use a HIPAA compliant secure messaging solution." Over the next several months, Telehealthcare.com will continue to work with substance abuse centers and residential treatment facilities along with strategic partners and service providers to roll out and demonstrate the abilities of our CarePanda app. The goal in the next six months is to continue to build a recurring revenue base, expand out the ecosystem and develop sales with resellers and customers in key target markets. Many of these market segments have strong, growing demand for HIPAA compliant communication solutions and telehealthcare services. CarePanda is an advanced messaging app that streamlines operations and facilitates secure messaging for caregivers including psychiatrists, toxicologists, pharmacists, nurses and other medical and non-medical staff. CarePanda app is easy to use. Users can quickly share text messages, documents, PDFs, images or medical forms with other medical professionals or patients. CarePanda meets all State retention laws, HITECH, State pharmacy regulations, HIPPA and Joint Commission (JCAHO) guidelines. CarePanda App easily integrates with existing processes and medical forms while adding security and meeting all Federal and State compliance requirements. Forms can be integrated and customized for your medical facility including: admissions, advance directives, BAA agreements, arbitration agreements, certification statements, financial arrangements, patient intake forms, outpatient registration, personal funds, social workers, therapy forms, lab forms and more! If you're a licensed Substance Abuse Center or Residential Treatment Center, contact us today at 1-888-99Panda for a demo of CarePanda! Based in San Clemente, California, Telehealthcare, Inc. is a digital healthcare technology company building and commercializing a telehealth platform that makes it easier for medical groups and healthcare service providers to adopt and implement telehealth solutions. The Company's core technology is CarePanda, a HIPAA compliant platform that includes advanced messaging, secure forms, e-prescriptions, HIPAA compliance and more. For more information, contact us at 1-888-99Panda or visit www.telehealthcare.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Workit Health, a digital behavioral health company, announced today that the National Science Foundation has awarded the company a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I grant. The grant awarded reflects a commitment from both Workit Health and the National Science Foundation to transform the way addiction recovery services are currently being delivered to and utilized by individuals. With $225,000 in funding, Workit Health will be developing an innovative addiction "thrive-meter” that will assist individuals in better identifying and achieving their desired health goals. “We’re thrilled to partner with NSF to support the development of cognitive data services that will propel our ability to deliver addiction treatment for the 21st century,” says Lisa McLaughlin, Workit’s Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer. “As the entire healthcare industry shifts from clunky interventions reliant on self-report to a precision data economy, we’re honored to have this opportunity to drive the edge in a space where we’ve lost so many to imprecise care models.” Over 20 million American adults (8.4% of the population) met the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders in 2014 according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Tens of millions more engage in risky substance abuse behaviors. Providing appropriate care is both time and cost prohibitive. Current available resources are frequently poorly matched to patients needs and wants. Left untreated or undertreated, risky substance use impacts every other area of patient health and well-being. Innovations such as the “thrive-meter” are becoming more important as healthcare moves towards personalized care and recovery. Leveraging AI, qualitative coaching data, and user input to create a measure of a patient’s level of substance wellbeing, the “thrive-meter” will also be developed to integrate future biometric inputs – whether physical fitness trackers, or devices measuring substance intake or blood alcohol content. “Person-centered care begins with person-centered assessments,” says Itai Danovitch, immediate past president of the California Society of Addiction Medicine, “and the SBIR grant awarded to Workit Health paves the way for rigorous evaluation of novel assessment tools that aim to do exactly that.” Workit Health will begin testing the prototype through clinical trials later this year and will move to integrate the “thrive-meter” into their commercial digital recovery program soon after. Robin McIntosh, Workit’s Co-Founder and President describes Workit’s design philosophy: “We started with the mission of meeting people where they are in their addiction. We blended the best of behavioral science, technology, and human-centric design to bring a compelling, novel experience that helps people clarify their own goals around addictive behaviors and take steps towards them, on their own terms, from anywhere.” Workit just made a new friend: the United States government. About Workit Health: Workit Health is a digital behavioral health company that offers an innovative online program for addiction prevention and recovery. Effective and anonymous, the program tailors to individual goals and to a wide array of addictive behaviors including substance use, gambling, sex and love, and eating-related. Workit Health guides individuals in all stages of addiction to a healthy thriving lifestyle through care coordination and a self-paced program of weekly interactive lessons, tailored content and personalized coaching from qualified addiction counselors. About National Science Foundation: The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that promotes and supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. Last year, NSF had a budget of $7.5 billion (FY 16) and funded 24 percent of all federally supported research at American colleges and universities. For more information, please visit https://www.nsf.gov/


News Article | January 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine have found that over 10 percent of those who have taken psilocybin-containing "magic mushrooms" experienced their worst "bad trip" and put themselves and others in danger during the event. A significant majority called the most distressing episode they had while on a trip "one of the biggest challenges" they have ever encountered in their life. Psilocybin and other hallucinogens became popular in the United States back in the 1960s as charismatic proponents charmed users with anecdotes of benefits and profound psychological experiences. However, most of them were banned in the 1970s for safety reasons, although not a lot of scientific evidence was released about the drugs' risks. Study author Roland Griffiths and the research team have conducted earlier works to confirm the benefits of psilocybin use. The current study, however, was aimed at highlighting the effects of bad trips. For a study, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, the researchers carried out a survey involving 1,993 participants. Focused on the topic of psilocybin use, the survey included three questionnaires: the Mystical Experience Questionnaire (developed by Griffiths and colleagues back in 2006), the Hallucinogen Rating Scale, and portions of the 5D-Altered States of Consciousness Questionnaire. The entire survey took about an hour to accomplish. Of the respondents, 78 percent were male, 89 percent were Caucasian, 66 percent were from the United States, and 51 percent had graduate or college degrees. Survey participants were, on average, 30 years old when they joined the study and 23 years old when they had their bad trips. Ninety-three percent also said they used psilocybin more than twice. Aside from the 10.7 percent that put themselves or others in danger during a bad trip, 2.6 percent said they became violent or aggressive while 2.7 percent said they sought out medical assistance. Five of those with reported pre-existing depression or anxiety or have thought of suicide before attempted suicide while on a bad high from the drug. At the same time, however, some study participants reported positive experiences from psilocybin, such as antidepressive effects, with six subjects saying their suicidal thoughts went away after their worst bad trip, a third saying the experience was one of the top five most meaningful events in their lives, and another third saying it was one of their top five most spiritually significant experience. "The counterintuitive finding that extremely difficult experiences can sometimes also be very meaningful experiences is consistent with what we see in our studies with psilocybin," said Griffiths. However, the researchers caution that enjoying the positive effects of psilocybin means ensuring the drug is taken in a safe environment. Magic mushrooms have long been used in certain cultures to promote healing and for religious purposes but corresponding safeguards have been developed as these cultures recognized the substance's potential dangers. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, about 8.7 percent of Americans or 22.9 million individuals in the country have taken psilocybin before. While it does come with psychological and behavioral risks, psilocybin is not addictive and is also not harmful to the liver, brain, and other organs. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Pittsburgh, PA, December 06, 2016 --( According to a November 16 press release issued by the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office: "On November 3, 2016, just two days after the installation of the VeroVision Mail Screener, Suboxone, also known as Buprenorphine, was found concealed within the seam of an envelope which was to be delivered to an inmate housed in the facility. The drug was in the form of a film strip that dissolves under the tongue, and is not easily detected with common visual inspection. Buprenorphine is a narcotic, a powerful and potentially addicting painkiller. According to a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) over half of the 30,000 hospitalizations involving buprenorphine in 2010 were for non-medical use." Illicit drugs that are concealed and smuggled into prisons is one of the more costly issues facing correctional facilities. The sale and use of illicit substances by inmates contributes to increased violence and heightened medical costs. The VeroVision Mail Screener was designed to address drug detection at one of the common points of entry for drug contraband: the correctional facility mail room. The system provides easy objective, one-click drug detection in less than 10 seconds. The Mail Screener can detect a number of illicit drugs and common cutting agents concealed on or within envelopes and paper, under stamps and stickers, and even mixed with crayon, markers or paint. The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is currently investigating to determine the origin of the incoming mail and the contraband inside. They encourage anyone with information regarding this case to contact the Sheriff’s Office at 707-445-7251 or the Sheriff’s Office Crime Tip line at 707-268-2539. For more information on the VeroVision Mail Screener product or ChemImage Sensor Systems, please visit About ChemImage Sensor Systems ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS™) develops innovative standoff chemical imaging sensors that make our world healthier and safer by utilizing patented imaging capabilities and leverage current in-the-field technologies to address the ever-changing landscape of drugs, chemical, biological and explosive (CBE) threats. CISS has developed a series of chemical imaging sensors for point, proximity, remote and standoff detection and identification in both fixed site and on-the-move configurations, in order to protect military troops, security personnel and citizens. For more information, visit ChemImage Sensor Systems is a subsidiary of ChemImage Corporation, a leader in chemical imaging technology and instrumentation. About ChemImage Corporation ChemImage Corporation is a Pittsburgh based company committed to making the world healthier and safer through dramatic advancements in chemical imaging technology. The company combines proprietary, state-of-the-art chemical imaging sensors, algorithms and analytical software to solve the world's most challenging health and safety issues. ChemImage seeks to provide an Awareness of Things™ (AoT™) to a global audience, using the company’s innovation platforms to provide people with unprecedented levels of vision, information and situational knowledge about their surroundings in their everyday lives. To accomplish this goal, the firm develops spectral imaging technologies for chemical and biological applications in numerous global industries; including life sciences, bio-medical, security, threat detection, anatomic pathology, forensics and diagnostics. For more information, visit Pittsburgh, PA, December 06, 2016 --( PR.com )-- ChemImage Sensor Systems announced that on November 1st, 2016, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office in Eureka, CA became the third installation site for ChemImage Sensor System’s VeroVision Mail Screener, a system that offers easy, objective, one-click detection of drugs concealed on or within mail. Just two days later, while the VeroVision Mail Screener was being used to routinely scan inmate mail, it detected an illicit material concealed within a particular envelope.According to a November 16 press release issued by the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:"On November 3, 2016, just two days after the installation of the VeroVision Mail Screener, Suboxone, also known as Buprenorphine, was found concealed within the seam of an envelope which was to be delivered to an inmate housed in the facility. The drug was in the form of a film strip that dissolves under the tongue, and is not easily detected with common visual inspection. Buprenorphine is a narcotic, a powerful and potentially addicting painkiller. According to a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) over half of the 30,000 hospitalizations involving buprenorphine in 2010 were for non-medical use."Illicit drugs that are concealed and smuggled into prisons is one of the more costly issues facing correctional facilities. The sale and use of illicit substances by inmates contributes to increased violence and heightened medical costs. The VeroVision Mail Screener was designed to address drug detection at one of the common points of entry for drug contraband: the correctional facility mail room. The system provides easy objective, one-click drug detection in less than 10 seconds. The Mail Screener can detect a number of illicit drugs and common cutting agents concealed on or within envelopes and paper, under stamps and stickers, and even mixed with crayon, markers or paint.The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is currently investigating to determine the origin of the incoming mail and the contraband inside. They encourage anyone with information regarding this case to contact the Sheriff’s Office at 707-445-7251 or the Sheriff’s Office Crime Tip line at 707-268-2539.For more information on the VeroVision Mail Screener product or ChemImage Sensor Systems, please visit www.cisensorsystems.com About ChemImage Sensor SystemsChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS™) develops innovative standoff chemical imaging sensors that make our world healthier and safer by utilizing patented imaging capabilities and leverage current in-the-field technologies to address the ever-changing landscape of drugs, chemical, biological and explosive (CBE) threats. CISS has developed a series of chemical imaging sensors for point, proximity, remote and standoff detection and identification in both fixed site and on-the-move configurations, in order to protect military troops, security personnel and citizens.For more information, visit www.cisensorsystems.com ChemImage Sensor Systems is a subsidiary of ChemImage Corporation, a leader in chemical imaging technology and instrumentation.About ChemImage CorporationChemImage Corporation is a Pittsburgh based company committed to making the world healthier and safer through dramatic advancements in chemical imaging technology. The company combines proprietary, state-of-the-art chemical imaging sensors, algorithms and analytical software to solve the world's most challenging health and safety issues.ChemImage seeks to provide an Awareness of Things™ (AoT™) to a global audience, using the company’s innovation platforms to provide people with unprecedented levels of vision, information and situational knowledge about their surroundings in their everyday lives. To accomplish this goal, the firm develops spectral imaging technologies for chemical and biological applications in numerous global industries; including life sciences, bio-medical, security, threat detection, anatomic pathology, forensics and diagnostics.For more information, visit www.chemimage.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from ChemImage Corporation


News Article | September 21, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced a challenge called the 2016 Naloxone App Competition, on Sept. 19, urging developers to create an app to combat the opioid overdose epidemic. Opioid overdose deaths have been drastically increasing in the country lately and the timely administration of the drug naloxone can save many lives. However, making naloxone available to people in need is a big challenge. To overcome this problem, the FDA along with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have invited computer professionals, health care advocates, entrepreneurs, clinical researchers and innovators to develop a mobile app that could help people avail timely administration of naloxone to reverse opioid overdose. Given the drastic increase in the number of deaths due to opioid overdose in the U.S., it is important to link overdosing individuals with those in possession of naloxone and can administer the drug. "[T]here's a vital need to harness the power of new technologies," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf, in a press release. Califf added that the competition has been announced to find innovators who make use of the advanced technologies to bring solution for health care related issues that costs the lives of tens of thousands of people in the country. Naloxone works by reversing the effect of opioid narcotics in the brain. If administrated on time, it can save a person from death in just a few minutes, reported the Orlando Sentinel. Given that not many people readily have access to the drug, this is where the mobile application comes into play. If a person is found unresponsive because of an opioid overdose, the first responder at the scene can use the naloxone finder app on a mobile device to determine where the quickest access to the drug is. Dr. Peter Lurie, public health strategy and analysis associate commissioner at the FDA, said that the idea of the competition is to come up with a scalable, inexpensive and crowd-sourced cell phone application that will address the problem of naloxone accessibility. He added that mobile apps to educate layman in recognizing overdosed individuals, administering the reversal drug and providing other health care services like CPR are available already. However, there is no app developed by far to connect a person in need of naloxone with the individual carrying the drug. It is more important to connect the victim with the nearest source possible because even a minute-delay could prove fatal. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Booth C.L.,Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
American Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: The Research Prioritization Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention conducted a stakeholder survey including 716 respondents from 49 U.S. states and 18 foreign countries. Purpose: To conduct a qualitative analysis on responses from individuals representing four main stakeholder groups: attempt and loss survivors, researchers, providers, and policy/administrators. This article focuses on a qualitative analysis of the early-round, open-ended responses collected in a modified online Delphi process, and, as an illustration of the research method, focuses on analysis of respondents' views of the role of life and emotional skills in suicide prevention. Methods: Content analysis was performed using both inductive and deductive code and category development and systematic qualitative methods. After the inductive coding was completed, the same data set was re-coded using the 12 Aspirational Goals (AGs) identified by the Delphi process. Results: Codes and thematic categories produced from the inductive coding process were, in some cases, very similar or identical to the 12 AGs (i.e., those dealing with risk and protective factors, provider training, preventing reattempts, and stigma). Other codes highlighted areas that were not identified as important in the Delphi process (e.g., cultural/social factors of suicide, substance use). Conclusions: Qualitative and mixed-methods research are essential to the future of suicide prevention work. By design, qualitative research is explorative and appropriate for complex, culturally embedded social issues such as suicide. Such research can be used to generate hypotheses for testing and, as in this analysis, illuminate areas that would be missed in an approach that imposed predetermined categories on data.

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