Stuttgart Muhlhausen, Germany

Stuttgart Media University

www.hdm-stuttgart.de
Stuttgart Muhlhausen, Germany
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On the occasion of a forthcoming curriculum revision the bachelor's study programme Information Management (IM) conducted a survey among all its previous graduates (graduation years 2008 - 2015) in March 2016 with 200 respondents based on a population of 303 people (response rate of 66 %). The results contain a retrospective feedback on the study programme and as a result, the reform of its structure. Besides they present basic dates concerning the graduates' career entry, job history and employment. Most of the graduates switch to their first employment without any problem. One-third adds a master's programme. 96 % of the graduates currently are employed, 64 % of them open-ended. The subject variety of IM's curriculum corresponds with a large range of sectors and fields of activities covered by the graduates. Altogether they are rather satisfied with their studies but claim more orientation and freedom regarding the choice of elective subjects. In this regard the revised curriculum will therefore provide more binding character and flexibility at the same time.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.5.3 | Award Amount: 12.71M | Year: 2014

Over 2 billion people worldwide have different types, degrees, or combinations of disability, literacy, digital literacy or aging related barriers that impede or prevent use of ICT. Not long ago you could live without access to ICT quite well. However today access to ICT is required for most education, employment, and commerce, and is increasingly required for travel, health, safety, daily living and participation in most of our society. Yet we currently only reach 3 to 15% of these - in developed countries. We cannot socially, economically or politically afford to have this cumulatively large percentage of our society offline going forward. Yet there is no way to reach them with our current model.\n\nProposed is phase II of an effort to create a paradigm shift in eInclusion. Part I was the FP7 project Cloud4all for creating instant, ubiquitous auto-personalization of interfaces and materials based on user needs and preferences. Part II, Prosperity4all, focuses on developing the infrastructure to allow a new ecosystem to grow; one that is based on self-rewarding collaboration, that can reduce redundant development, lower costs, increase market reach and penetration internationally, and create the robust cross-platform spectrum of mainstream and assistive technology based access solutions required. This will be done through a process based on true value propositions for all stakeholders and resulting in a system that can profitably serve markets as small as one, at a personally and societally affordable cost. This infrastructure will use cloud, crowd, game and smart technologies, to bring new players with both low and high technical skills into the development and delivery ecosystem, introduce accessibility as a ubiquitous service, and combine auto-configured access features built into mainstream products with assistive technologies and services to create the rich milieu of options needed to bring this diverse population of populations into our digital future.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: TPT.2010-4.;TPT.2010-5. | Award Amount: 1.80M | Year: 2011

Enhancing interconnectivity of short & long distance transport networks through passenger focused interlinked information-connectivity IC-IC will develop an ICS (InfoConnectivity System), involving the airports of Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Paris & Vienna, related ground transport & airlines, representing both short- & long-distance transport. Many stakeholders will get involved in a Stakeholders Forum & Conference. By providing currently missing information which travellers already wish to have with regard to facilities & services of their next immediate destination and/or next transport provider(s), the ICS is expected to improve the travelling experience implying a possible gain of time, and improve change between transport modes. Much of such information can be provided while waiting, e.g. in the airport train/bus, the lounge, the airplane, utilizing camera mobile phones to connect to information provided by QR (Quick Response) codes, and mobile phones fitted with NFC (Near Field Communication) able to connect to respective tags. To provide ICS information to the multi-lingual target group of travellers, a language translation software will be employed to offer all information in 14 languages with English as the reference language. Requirements of the ageing population are considered by utilizing the Age Explorer, a suit that lets test persons experience the obstacles old persons encounter when moving, filling out forms, operating Self Check-in, or a ticket machine. 1000 persons in 3 countries will be interviewed, information of Stakeholders collected, model ICS applications developed & implemented to serve in real live situations. The effectiveness of the InfoConnectivity improvements will be assessed with regard to information made available which otherwise a traveller would not have been able to access plus gained time & ease of passenger transfer between transport networks. Based on this, an ICS handbook will be elaborated.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.7.1 | Award Amount: 5.14M | Year: 2010

The project focuses on the development and prototyping of remotely-controlled, semi-autonomous robotic solutions in domestic environments to support elderly people. In particular, the SRS project will demonstrate an innovative, practical and efficient system called shadow robot for personalised home care.\n\nMost elderly people want to live in the familiar environment of their own residence for as long as possible. However, not many can live with their adult children and therefore, at some stage, often late in life, have to live alone. Studies show that some forms of home care are usually required as they advance in years.\nSRS solutions are designed to enable a robot to act as a shadow of its controller. For example, elderly parents can have a robot as a shadow of their children or carers. In this case, adult children or carers can help them remotely and physically with tasks such as getting up or going to bed, doing the laundry and setting up ICT equipment etc. as if the children or carers were resident in the house. This objective will be realised through the following SRS innovations:\n1) A new intent-based remote control mechanism to enable the robots to be tele-operated over a real-world communication network robustly. 2) An adaptive automation mechanism to enable a highly efficient task execution for remotely controlled service robots. 3) A new robotic self-learning mechanism to enable the robots to learn from their experience. 4) A safety-oriented framework derived through extensive usability and user acceptance studies that enable service robots to be effectively deployed into home care applications.\nThe shadow robot prototypes created with EU support in the SRS project will be tested at the S.Maria Nascente Centre in Milano and the IZA Care Center in San Sebastin. The final solution will be further developed by Hewlett-Packard and other industrial partners of the consortium for a worldwide market with significant potential and volume.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.5 | Award Amount: 12.98M | Year: 2011

As we move inextricably into a digital economy there is a looming crisis for a growing number of increasingly marginalized individuals. The accessibility technologies we have are meeting the needs of only some, at high cost, and will not work with many new technologies. The path and pace of technological change predestines these approaches to fail in the very near future. At the same time the incidence of disabilities is increasing as our population ages.\nThe same technical advances however hold the potential for a radical paradigm shift in our approach to accessibility that can harness the pace of innovation and have it work for us rather than against us. An international consortium is forming to tap the unprecedented ability to pool resources and match demand with supply enabled by the Cloud to build a Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (GPII) that can deliver accessibility to every individual where they need it, when they need it and in a way that matches their unique requirements; automatically so that they do not need to negotiate, explain, qualify or justify.\nCloud4All represents a European based effort to advance the GPII concept by pulling together a large multi-sector international community including stakeholders, industry leaders and experts in emerging technologies to thoughtfully research, design, develop and test the key software infrastructure and pilot implementations needed to explore this promising approach to digital inclusion. Cloud4All will do this by:\n-Creating/refining user profiling standards and tools capable of capturing the individual needs and preferences of the full range of users facing interface barriers\n-Creating/refining interface and materials profiling standards and tools capable of characterizing the full range of ICT/materials users need to access and the different techniques and strategies for accessing them\n-Improving mechanisms to match users and with interfaces and materials they can use or techniques or services that can make them usable\n-Creating a mechanism to allow users to locate solutions from many different sources in a single search\n-Demonstrating automatic, on-demand, matching or modification of mainstream and specialized technologiesto match each individual as they encounter them, including proof-of-concept demonstrations of this approach across a spectrum of technologies including: Computer OSs and Browsers; Web pages/Apps; Mobiles; Kiosks/Info-Transaction Machines; Installed and Virtual Assistive Technologies; Digital Televisions and Smart Homes\n-Testing of the concept with users with a wide variety and combination of physical, sensory, cognitive, language, and learning disabilities\nIf successful, this approach may give us our first chance of reaching the large group of users that do not qualify for or otherwise have not been reached by special services, but nonetheless face barriers to access that prevent them from participating in our rapidly advancing digitally enabled society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-21-2014 | Award Amount: 3.17M | Year: 2015

As stated in Forbes, .. the world of education is going to go through one of the most massive changes in the next five years than it has seen in the last three thousand years. Its a perfect storm. This change is driven by the extreme pressure on schools to produce outcomes, too many children are leaving school with no meaningful job skills; and those children at risk of exclusion are especially affected as they are not able to reach their full potential. In parallel, the business growth potential for non-leisure applications of digital games is wide, and estimated to reach 77 billion in 2015. No One Left Behind has been created to take advantages of the opportunities and the potential of digital games to tackle these challenges in the education sector. This project will create a new generation of Pocket Code (a mobile media-rich programming environment for children) to unlock inclusive gaming creation and experiences in formal learning situations, underpin meaningful learning and support children to realise their full potential; by transferring game mechanics, dynamics, assets and in-game analytics from non-leisure digital games SMEs, into Pocket Code, which also will be adapted to academic curricula. Evidence of this approach will be provided through 3 experimental pilots (UK, Austria and Spain) comprising some 600 children/students, over 9-12 academic subjects and in 5 schools. A realistic business model and plan for No One Left Behinds exploitable outputs is provided in order to support the project`s sustainability and scalability. Furthermore, impact arising from the project will be enabled by the effective cross-sectoral technology transfer (from leisure to non-leisure sectors). This will include new products and services, and through the scaling of current SMEs game-based products for the educational sector, and by improving backend analytics that can be monetized through freemium business models and segmented advertising.


Kritzenberger H.,Stuttgart Media University
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference WWW/Internet 2015 | Year: 2015

The W3C claim on one Web available to any device with multimodal access, forces designers to understand new forms of interaction. User studies on touchless interaction, as some results discussed in this paper, suggest to understand it as an embodied interaction process. Embodied interaction emphasize the relationship between the body's action, the environment and cognitive processes. Therefore, touchless interaction cannot be understood as merely carrying out the same thing in different ways, but needs the designer's understanding of how the properties of technology and the human system are combined together in natural interaction processes. © 2015.

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