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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Tech chiefs have cautiously welcomed Microsoft's latest tablet device but want more detail about Microsoft's future plans. Microsoft hopes the third iteration of its Surface Pro tablet will be the one that makes a breakthrough: it is touting the Surface Pro 3 as a full laptop replacement and also wants it to stem the tide of Android and iOS tablets that have been flooding into businesses. Enterprises have been seen as keen for the arrival of a decent Windows tablet, largely because they are heavily invested in Microsoft on the desktop and elsewhere in their infrastructure, so the response of CIOs to the new hardware could be key to its success. But when asked "Is the Surface Pro 3 the device that will provide the breakthrough in the enterprise that Windows tablets need?" TechRepublic's panel of tech chiefs were evenly split on its prospects. Some were enthusiastic: Tim Stiles, CIO at the Bremerton Housing Authority, said: "We have already begun transition away from Apple to Microsoft tablets - a very positive outcome." And Kelly Bodway, VP of IT atUniversal Lighting Technologies, said his organisation had deployed several of the Surface Pro 2s and found them to be "very capable" laptop replacements, but added: "Pricing and Microsoft's commitment to the product line are the two concerns we have. The pricing of the [Surface Pro] 3 is comparable to a high-end business laptop if not slightly more expensive. And, it is a new product of which Microsoft has not shared a long term road map." Jerry Justice, IT director at SS&G Financial Services, said his organisation has also been using the Dell Venue and the Microsoft Surface as laptop replacements, and noted: "They have been well received by staff and are a good blend between laptop and tablet form factors. The path forward still requires context, it really depends on your app makeup and services delivery models. We have a blend of these services and these devices provide a good current path." Kevin Leypoldt, IS director at Structural Integrity Associates, said devices like the Surface seemed like the obvious way to bridge the gap between touchscreens and traditional desktop interfaces but admitted: "I wish I could say why these hybrid type machines have not yet caught on in market share." He said his organisation has several convertible laptops and older Surface devices and they work quite well in the office and in the field, and added: "With Windows 8.1 making some serious strides in allowing Windows to work better using more traditional input devices (keyboard and mouse), the missing link may be the hardware where the Surface 3 may help fill this gap," he said. Florentin Albu, CIO at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, said whether Surface will make a breakthrough depends on the type of work being done. For example, workers who are information consumers - such as executives - have already made a move towards iPads and to a lesser extent Androids. In contrast workers who need to do heavy document editing, Excel processing, desktop-publishing and the like are unlikely to be convinced, he said, while for staff involved in data entry the cost of the hardware will be the main barrier. He said: "I believe that unfortunately the Surface tablet needs to catch up with iOS and Android ones, and it is not the hardware but the application ecosystem that will win this war. The Surface banks on the significant number of applications that come with the Windows heritage (well at least the ones running on Windows 8). Most of these however have been designed in the pre-cloud era. "Looking at the iOS or Android ecosystem, mostly everything is designed to use the cloud - for storage, processing, integration etc. Clearly this will change as Windows apps are catching up. Will the change come in time though?" Albu added: "In a BYOD era, the question is which device is more appealing to the end user? I have not seen the Surface generating much co-worker envy, like the iPads or - to an extent - the Galaxys have done...we will definitely see an uptake of Surface in the enterprise, it might not, however, be to a point of domination." Andrew Paton, group manager IT services at Rondo, also saw pluses and minuses to the device: "It is certainly a better contender, but some of the old shortfalls remain. The device is perhaps what it should have been from the start, but like anything we see from [Microsoft] it seems to take a couple of attempts before they seems to take on board the feedback and get it looking right. I can't believe it has taken as long as it has to get that kick stand right! Great that it is lighter. It had to be to survive." Paton said his organisation had evaluated the Surface as a replacement laptop and said "you couldn't fault the performance of the device or the screen clarity". He said the battery life was not as huge a concern as some suggested but said: "The real faults in my opinion were the weight, the lack of two USB ports (one is not really good enough in the corporate environment) the lack of a solid keyboard (type covers were not robust enough and lacked quality)." He added: "The other concern for us was the need to carry around adapters for this and that. Adapters when given to sales reps inevitability get lost or left at client sites or forgotten when you need to do that important presentation." However, not all tech chiefs are experimenting with the devices - John Gracyalny, VP of IT at SafeAmerica Credit Union, said: "Until my key vendors support Windows 8, the Surface is not an option." Want to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury and have your say on the hot issues for IT decision-makers? If you are a CIO, CTO, IT director or equivalent at a large or small company, working in the private sector or in government, and you want to join TechRepublic's CIO Jury pool, or you know an IT chief who should, then get in contact. Either click the Contact link below or email me, steve dot ranger at techrepublic dot com, and send your name, title, company, location, and email address.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Tech chiefs have cautiously welcomed Microsoft's latest tablet device but want more detail about Microsoft's future plans. Microsoft hopes the third iteration of its Surface Pro tablet will be the one that makes a breakthrough: it is touting the Surface Pro 3 as a full laptop replacement and also wants it to stem the tide of Android and iOS tablets that have been flooding into businesses. Enterprises have been seen as keen for the arrival of a decent Windows tablet, largely because they are heavily invested in Microsoft on the desktop and elsewhere in their infrastructure, so the response of CIOs to the new hardware could be key to its success. But when asked "Is the Surface Pro 3 the device that will provide the breakthrough in the enterprise that Windows tablets need?" TechRepublic's panel of tech chiefs were evenly split on its prospects. Some were enthusiastic: Tim Stiles, CIO at the Bremerton Housing Authority, said: "We have already begun transition away from Apple to Microsoft tablets - a very positive outcome." And Kelly Bodway, VP of IT atUniversal Lighting Technologies, said his organisation had deployed several of the Surface Pro 2s and found them to be "very capable" laptop replacements, but added: "Pricing and Microsoft's commitment to the product line are the two concerns we have. The pricing of the [Surface Pro] 3 is comparable to a high-end business laptop if not slightly more expensive. And, it is a new product of which Microsoft has not shared a long term road map." Jerry Justice, IT director at SS&G Financial Services, said his organisation has also been using the Dell Venue and the Microsoft Surface as laptop replacements, and noted: "They have been well received by staff and are a good blend between laptop and tablet form factors. The path forward still requires context, it really depends on your app makeup and services delivery models. We have a blend of these services and these devices provide a good current path." Kevin Leypoldt, IS director at Structural Integrity Associates, said devices like the Surface seemed like the obvious way to bridge the gap between touchscreens and traditional desktop interfaces but admitted: "I wish I could say why these hybrid type machines have not yet caught on in market share." He said his organisation has several convertible laptops and older Surface devices and they work quite well in the office and in the field, and added: "With Windows 8.1 making some serious strides in allowing Windows to work better using more traditional input devices (keyboard and mouse), the missing link may be the hardware where the Surface 3 may help fill this gap," he said. Florentin Albu, CIO at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, said whether Surface will make a breakthrough depends on the type of work being done. For example, workers who are information consumers - such as executives - have already made a move towards iPads and to a lesser extent Androids. In contrast workers who need to do heavy document editing, Excel processing, desktop-publishing and the like are unlikely to be convinced, he said, while for staff involved in data entry the cost of the hardware will be the main barrier. He said: "I believe that unfortunately the Surface tablet needs to catch up with iOS and Android ones, and it is not the hardware but the application ecosystem that will win this war. The Surface banks on the significant number of applications that come with the Windows heritage (well at least the ones running on Windows 8). Most of these however have been designed in the pre-cloud era. "Looking at the iOS or Android ecosystem, mostly everything is designed to use the cloud - for storage, processing, integration etc. Clearly this will change as Windows apps are catching up. Will the change come in time though?" Albu added: "In a BYOD era, the question is which device is more appealing to the end user? I have not seen the Surface generating much co-worker envy, like the iPads or - to an extent - the Galaxys have done...we will definitely see an uptake of Surface in the enterprise, it might not, however, be to a point of domination." Andrew Paton, group manager IT services at Rondo, also saw pluses and minuses to the device: "It is certainly a better contender, but some of the old shortfalls remain. The device is perhaps what it should have been from the start, but like anything we see from [Microsoft] it seems to take a couple of attempts before they seems to take on board the feedback and get it looking right. I can't believe it has taken as long as it has to get that kick stand right! Great that it is lighter. It had to be to survive." Paton said his organisation had evaluated the Surface as a replacement laptop and said "you couldn't fault the performance of the device or the screen clarity". He said the battery life was not as huge a concern as some suggested but said: "The real faults in my opinion were the weight, the lack of two USB ports (one is not really good enough in the corporate environment) the lack of a solid keyboard (type covers were not robust enough and lacked quality)." He added: "The other concern for us was the need to carry around adapters for this and that. Adapters when given to sales reps inevitability get lost or left at client sites or forgotten when you need to do that important presentation." However, not all tech chiefs are experimenting with the devices - John Gracyalny, VP of IT at SafeAmerica Credit Union, said: "Until my key vendors support Windows 8, the Surface is not an option." Want to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury and have your say on the hot issues for IT decision-makers? If you are a CIO, CTO, IT director or equivalent at a large or small company, working in the private sector or in government, and you want to join TechRepublic's CIO Jury pool, or you know an IT chief who should, then get in contact. Either click the Contact link below or email me, steve dot ranger at techrepublic dot com, and send your name, title, company, location, and email address.


Wright I.G.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Dooley R.B.,Structural Integrity Associates
International Materials Reviews | Year: 2010

The focus of this review is the state of knowledge of the oxidation behaviour in steam of alloys with potential for use as pressure parts in steam boilers. The rate of oxide growth on steam-touched surfaces and the characteristics of that oxide are of increasing interest as the quest for improvements in cycle efficiency leads to progressively higher operating temperatures and pressures. The consequences of increased rate of growth of these oxides are of concern because of implications for tube overheating and oxide exfoliation. Mitigation of such problems requires a mechanistic understanding of the influences of alloy composition and microstructure, and especially of the evolution with time of specific scale structures. Similarly, the relative effects of factors such as time, temperature and operating parameters must be understood. The oxidation behaviour of the class of ferritic steels that forms the bulk of the heat transfer surface in steam boilers is of particular importance since alloys in the range 9-12%Cr (% in alloy compositions signifies weight percentage, unless indicated otherwise) are close to a transition from oxidation behaviour based on relatively thick Fe-based scales to the formation of much thinner, Cr-rich oxides. For austenitic steels protective behaviour in steam depends critically on the rapid development of a continuous Cr-rich oxide layer, otherwise oxide growth rates similar to the ferritic steels may result. Understanding the interplay among compositional and microstructural requirements for strengthening and oxidation resistance, and their influence on the rate and mode of scale evolution is key to the most effective application of these alloys. The oxidation behaviour of high-temperature Ni-based alloys in steam has received relatively little attention, but the broad range of alloying additions considered, compared to austenitic steels, has the potential to contribute in different ways to the scale morphologies and oxidation behaviour. Underlying these interests is the apparently significant contribution to oxide growth in steam from inward transport of oxidant species that likely involve hydrogen. The particular species involved and their roles in the oxidation process are expected to exert a large influence on the oxide morphologies developed, while the fate of any hydrogen released in the alloy is a further topic of particular interest. © 2010 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining and ASM International.


Gordon B.M.,Structural Integrity Associates
JOM | Year: 2013

Serious corrosion problems have plagued the light water reactor (LWR) industry for decades. The complex corrosion mechanisms involved and the development of practical engineering solutions for their mitigation will be discussed in this article. After a brief overview of the basic designs of the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR), emphasis will be placed on the general corrosion of LWR containments, flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel components, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWRs, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in PWRs, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in both systems. Finally, the corrosion future of both plants will be discussed as plants extend their period of operation for an additional 20 to 40 years. © 2013 TMS.


Trademark
Structural Integrity Associates | Date: 2016-10-31

COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE FOR USE IN TRACKING THE POSITION AND SKEW OF ULTRASOUND PROBES. COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE FOR USE IN THE POWER GENERATION INDUSTRY AND WITH HIGH ENERGY PIPING PROGRAMS, FOSSIL FUELS, OIL AND GAS SYSTEMS FOR USE IN PROACTIVELY MANAGING, ACCESSING, ANALYZING, AND MAKING USE OF DATA RELATED TO THE OPERATING HISTORY AND CONDITION OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT.


Trademark
Structural Integrity Associates | Date: 2016-10-31

COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR USE IN ASSESSING AND ANALYZING PIPELINE DEFECTS, CRACKS AND PERFORMANCE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR USE IN THE POWER GENERATION INDUSTRY NAMELY COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR USE IN PROACTIVELY MANAGING, ACCESSING, ANALYZING, AND MAKING USE OF DATA RELATED TO THE DESIGN, OPERATING HISTORY, INSPECTION HISTORY AND CONDITION OF PIPELINES.


Patent
Structural Integrity Associates | Date: 2016-02-11

The present invention provides methods and systems for a dynamic pulsed eddy current probe that includes at least two magnetizing yokes having a first leg and a second leg, and a coil assembly comprising a coil, wherein the second leg of the at least two magnetizing yokes is positioned within the coil assembly.


Patent
Structural Integrity Associates | Date: 2016-03-30

The present invention provides methods and systems for in-line inspection of a pipe using a dynamic pulsed eddy current probe system that includes of a remote computer, a dynamic pulsed eddy current probe, a data acquisition system, and a delivery apparatus used for nondestructive examination of pipelines.


Patent
Structural Integrity Associates | Date: 2015-07-30

The present invention provides methods and systems for an impact barrier system that includes a concrete panel having a front side and a back side, and an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene layer engaged to at least one side of the concrete panel.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.91K | Year: 2014

Internal piping and vessel components in nuclear reactors often suffer from premature failure due to degradation from vibration and cavitation which are caused from turbulent flow inherent to these systems. The problem being addressed herein is part of the Department of Energy’s stated mission “to ensure security and prosperity.” The technology to be developed through this proposal is based upon a technique where ultrasonic sensors will be used to locate and monitor vibration of internal pipe and vessel components, such as valves and jet pump components. Additionally, the technology will be used to monitor harmful cavitation in the fluid flowing around the internal components. In this research, high temperature and radiation resistant ultrasonic probes will be tested to prove that they are viable options for long term exposure to radioactive and high temperature environments. Upon completion, a monitoring system will be developed that will provide real- time, in-service monitoring of nuclear power plant components. This will enable power companies to reduce system downtime for mandatory scheduled maintenance and reduce risk of catastrophic failure of plant components. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The development and certification of high temperature and radiation resistant ultrasonic probes will find application in a large span of industries. These industries range from: aerospace applications where satellites, spacecraft, and aircraft can be subjected to radiation and extreme temperatures, defense for monitoring of nuclear powered vessels, high temperature applications in the power industry, and high temperature application in the automotive industry. In principle, high temperature ultrasonic structural health monitoring is possible, however, the practical aspects such that implementation of such probes in high temperature applications for in-service monitoring need to be addressed. This is one of the primary aspects of this work. Furthermore, the technology developed for monitoring of internal component vibration and cavitation development can find applications in non-nuclear power plant facilities, remote pipe line monitoring, off shore platform component monitoring, and monitoring of aircraft and marine components.

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