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Arkansas City, AR, United States
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Squires A.,New York University | Chitashvili T.,Strengthen | Djbouti M.,Partnership for Research and Action for Health PRAH | Ridge L.,New York University | Chyun D.,New York University
Public Health | Year: 2017

Objectives Research capacity building in the health sciences in low- and middle-income countries has typically focused on bench-science capacity, but research examining health service delivery and health workforce is equally necessary to determine the best ways to deliver care. The Republic of Georgia, formerly a part of the Soviet Union, has multiple issues within its healthcare system that would benefit from expended research capacity, but the current research environment needs to be explored prior to examining research-focused activities. The purpose of this project was to conduct a needs assessment focused on developing research capacity in the Republic of Georgia with an emphasis on workforce and network development. Study design A case study approach guided by a needs assessment format. Methods We conducted in-country, informal, semi-structured interviews in English with key informants and focus groups with faculty, students, and representatives of local non-governmental organizations. Purposive and snowball sampling approaches were used to recruit participants, with key informant interviews scheduled prior to arrival in country. Documents relevant to research capacity building were also included. Interview results were coded via content analysis. Final results were organized into a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threat) analysis format, with the report shared with participants. Results There is widespread interest among students and faculty in Georgia around building research capacity. Lack of funding was identified by many informants as a barrier to research. Many critical research skills, such as proposal development, qualitative research skills, and statistical analysis, were reported as very limited. Participants expressed concerns about the ethics of research, with some suggesting that research is undertaken to punish or ‘expose’ subjects. However, students and faculty are highly motivated to improve their skills, are open to a variety of learning modalities, and have research priorities aligned with Georgian health needs. Conclusions This study's findings indicate that while the Georgian research infrastructure needs further development, Georgian students and faculty are eager to supplement its gaps by improving their own skills. These findings are consistent with those seen in other developing country contexts. © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health


Rahimzai M.,Strengthen | Naeem A.J.,Ministry of Public Health | Holschneider S.,Bethesda University | Hekmati A.K.,USAID Health Care Improvement Project
Conflict and Health | Year: 2015

Background: Access to health services in Afghanistan has expanded in the last decade; however, gaps in care quality and outcomes of care remain a challenge. Recognizing these gaps, in 2009 the USAID Health Care Improvement Project (HCI) began assisting the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) in Afghanistan to improve the quality of health services. Though eventually scaled up to nine provinces, in 2009 the MoPH and HCI began developing and testing a facility-based, scalable model of maternal and newborn interventions in health facilities in Kunduz and Balkh provinces and in several large public and private hospitals in Kabul. Case description: To address these issues, the MoPH and HCI applied the collaborative improvement approach, which links the efforts of multiple teams focused on making improvements in the same area of care to achieve the same aims. As demonstration sites, two provincial level quality improvement teams (QITs) were established in Kunduz and Balkh provinces that, in turn, supported 25 facility-level QITs chosen by purposive sampling. In addition, three government maternity hospitals and three private hospitals in Kabul were selected by the MoPH to participate in a demonstration hospital collaborative. Measurable gains were achieved in these demonstration sites for use of the partograph, compliance with antenatal care counseling, vaginal births for which all three elements of active management of the third stage of labor were performed, and compliance with newborn and postnatal care standards. Discussion and evaluation: Quality of care can be significantly improved by engaging teams of frontline workers to identify problems and find local solutions for those problems. Based on the results achieved in Kunduz, Balkh, and Kabul, the collaborative improvement work was expanded from 2010-2012 to seven more provinces. The results achieved on the ground also led the MoPH to establish a unit for quality and a national health care quality improvement strategy for Afghanistan. Conclusions: Afghanistan demonstrates that even in fragile states, measurable improvements in actual patient care at the frontlines of service delivery can be achieved while systematically building capacity at all levels of the health system through national leadership and policy making. © 2014 Rahimzai et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Trademark
Strengthen | Date: 2016-10-06

Clothing, namely, shirts, leggings, pants, jackets, sweatshirts, hooded sweatshirts, hats, headbands, footwear. Yoga and fitness instruction; Training and instruction of yoga and yoga-based physical activity.


Trademark
Strengthen | Date: 2016-10-06

Clothing, namely, shirts, leggings, pants, jackets, sweatshirts, hooded sweatshirts, hats, headbands, footwear. Yoga and fitness instruction; Training and instruction of yoga and yoga-based physical activity.


PubMed | Strengthen
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in public health | Year: 2016

There is little evidence to direct health systems toward providing efficient interventions to address medical errors, defined as an unintended act of omission or commission or one not executed as intended that may or may not cause harm to the patient but does not achieve its intended outcome. We believe that lack of guidance on what is the most efficient way to reduce medical errors and improve the quality of health-care limits the scale-up of health system improvement interventions. Challenges to economic evaluation of these interventions include defining and implementing improvement interventions in different settings with high fidelity, capturing all of the positive and negative effects of the intervention, using process measures of effectiveness rather than health outcomes, and determining the full cost of the intervention and all economic consequences of its effects. However, health system improvement interventions should be treated similarly to individual medical interventions and undergo rigorous economic evaluation to provide actionable evidence to guide policy-makers in decisions of resource allocation for improvement activities among other competing demands for health-care resources.


Trademark
Strengthen | Date: 2014-03-18

Nutritional and dietary supplements; Nutritional supplement energy bars; Protein supplements. Pasta; Granola-based snack bars; Ready to eat, cereal derived food bars; High-protein cereal bars; Chocolate-based meal replacement bars.


Trademark
Strengthen | Date: 2014-06-25

Nutritional and dietary supplements formed and packaged as bars; Nutritional supplement energy bars.


Trademark
Strengthen | Date: 2016-11-15

Clothing, namely, tops, t-shirts.


PubMed | Strengthen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nursing education perspectives | Year: 2016

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of senior baccalaureate nursing students and faculty members regarding telehealth and rural nursing concepts before and after participation in a newly developed simulation, which incorporated telehealth use in a rural home environment. Statistically significant increases in knowledge were found in both faculty and students following participation in the simulation. The results of this research indicate the need to increase student and faculty knowledge about telehealth and rural nursing concepts.

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